Children of Japan

Children of Japan
Courtesy, R. John Wright

The Jumeau 201

The Jumeau 201
Courtesy Theriault's and Antique Doll Collector Magazine

Hinges and Hearts

Hinges and Hearts
An Exhibit of our Metal Dolls

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Tuxedo and Bangles

Tuxedo and Bangles

A History of Metal Dolls

A History of Metal Dolls
Now on Alibris.com and In Print! The First Book of its Kind

Alice, Commemorative Edition

Alice, Commemorative Edition
Courtesy, R. John Wright

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Emma, aka, La Contessa Bathory

Emma, aka, La Contessa Bathory
Her Grace wishes us all a Merry Christmas!

Annabelle

Annabelle

Emma Emmeline

Emma Emmeline
Our New Addition/fond of stuffed toys

Cloth Clown

Cloth Clown

Native American Art

Native American Art

the triplets

the triplets

c. 1969 Greek Plastic Mini Baby

c. 1969 Greek Plastic Mini Baby
Bought Athens on the street

Iron Maiden; Middle Ages

Iron Maiden; Middle Ages

Sand Baby Swirls!

Sand Baby Swirls!
By Glenda Rolle, courtesy, the Artist

Glenda's Logo

Glenda's Logo
Also, a link to her site

Sand Baby Castaway

Sand Baby Castaway
By Glenda Rolle, Courtesy the Artist

A French Friend

A French Friend

Mickey

Mickey
From our friends at The Fennimore Museum

2000+ year old Roman Rag Doll

2000+ year old Roman Rag Doll
British Museum, Child's Tomb

Ancient Egypt Paddle Doll

Ancient Egypt Paddle Doll
Among first "Toys?"

ushabti

ushabti
Egyptian Tomb Doll 18th Dynasty

Ann Parker Doll of Anne Boleyn

Ann Parker Doll of Anne Boleyn

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Tin Head Brother and Sister, a Recent Purchase

Tin Head Brother and Sister, a Recent Purchase
Courtesy, Antique Daughter

Judge Peep

Judge Peep

Hakata Doll Artist at Work

Hakata Doll Artist at Work
From the Museum Collection

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Japanese Costume Barbies

Japanese Costume Barbies
Samurai Ken

Etienne

Etienne
A Little Girl

Happy Heart Day

Happy Heart Day

From "Dolls"

From "Dolls"
A Favorite Doll Book

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Jenny Wren

Jenny Wren
Ultimate Doll Restorer

Our Friends at The Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum

Our Friends at The Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum

Baby Boo 1960s

Baby Boo 1960s
Reclaimed and Restored as a childhood Sabrina the Witch with Meow Meow

Dr. E's on Display with sign

Dr. E's on Display with sign

Dolls Restored ad New to the Museum

Dolls Restored ad New to the Museum
L to R: K*R /celluloid head, all bisque Artist Googly, 14 in. vinyl inuit sixties, early celluloid Skookum type.

Two More Rescued Dolls

Two More Rescued Dolls
Late Sixties Vinyl: L to R: Probably Horseman, all vinyl, jointed. New wig. R: Effanbee, probably Muffy, mid sixties. New wig and new clothing on both. About 12 inches high.

Restored Italian Baby Doll

Restored Italian Baby Doll
One of Dr. E's Rescued Residents

Dolls on Display

Dolls on Display
L to R: Nutcrackers, Danish Troll, HItty and her book, Patent Washable, Mechanical Minstrel, Creche figure, M. Alexander Swiss. Center is a German mechanical bear on the piano. Background is a bisque German costume doll.

A Few Friends

A Few Friends
These dolls are Old German and Nutcrackers from Dr. E's Museum. They are on loan to another local museum for the holidays.

Vintage Collage

Vintage Collage
Public Domain Art

The Merry Wanderer

The Merry Wanderer
Courtesy R. John Wright, The Hummel Collection

The Fennimore Doll Museum

The Fennimore Doll Museum

Robert

Robert
A Haunted Doll with a Story

Halloween Dolls Displayed in a Local Library

Halloween Dolls Displayed in a Local Library

The Cody Jumeau

The Cody Jumeau
Long-faced or Jumeau Triste

German Princesses

German Princesses
GAHC 2005

A Little PowerRanger

A Little PowerRanger
Halloween 2004

The Island of the Dolls

The Island of the Dolls
Shrine to Dolls in Mexico

Based on the Nutshell Series of Death

Based on the Nutshell Series of Death
Doll House murder

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A lovely dress

A lovely dress

Raggedy Ann

Raggedy Ann
A few friends in cloth!

Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum, WI

Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum, WI
Pixar Animator's Collection

Little PM sisters

Little PM sisters
Recent eBay finds

Dressed Mexican Fleas

Dressed Mexican Fleas

Really old Dolls!

Really old Dolls!

Wednesday, March 30, 2011

Carmel Doll Shop and John Noble

More years than I care to remember, I knew one of the owners of this shop. In fact, the previous owners were from the Quad Cities! Small world. Michael and his friend knew one of my collecting idols, the late John Noble. On their site is the catalog fo his collection. My first doll book, bought by my mom for my 7th birthday, was Noble's Dolls. Since that first book, I've purchased many as my new published Bibliography will show, but I love his books immeasurably. He had an eye for the rarest of the rare, and a sense of humor. It is a wonderful catalog to view on line. I printed a copy to keep for my archives.

I have my share of collectible printouts; after a while, things even disappear from The Net. One day, my printouts might be all there is. My motto is, "When the going gets tough, the tough print paper dolls!"

Monday, March 28, 2011

Book Bombs/Doll Bombs?

Just reaad about book bombs, and have discussed them on two of my other blogs. These are collaborative literacy projects where an artists, or group of artists, creates a handmade book, and leaves it in public for people to continuing working on. Could we have a doll bomb project? Wouldn't it be great? We could have a doll with some embellishments, that is left in a public place. People would be enourage to add to it, or bring it something. It could live in a box, or a shrine, and if it is taken, others could take its place. It could be a discarded doll, or a commercial, generic doll that would otherwise by thrown out. There are all kinds of paints and embellishments people could add. I'd be interested to hear comments and ideas.

Thursday, March 24, 2011

Lesley Gordon and A Pageant of Dolls

Here are some links and information about Gordon and her books. I have always loved her work. I used to check this book out again and again from our library, but then it disappeared. She was a friend of a friend, my good penpal Mary Hillier. Mary used to tell me stories about Gordon in her old age, and of the beautiful dried flower pictures she still made in her eighties

Name Author DiscussionFirst Published Genre Subjects Original Language
1

"I never was a coward" Lesley Gordon
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2

A Country Herbal Lesley Gordon
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3

A Year of Flowers Lesley Gordon
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4

Aspects of gender Lesley Gordon
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5

General George E. Pickett in life & legend Lesley Gordon
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6

Green magic Lesley Gordon
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7

Insight City Guide Toronto Lesley Gordon
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8

Insight Guide Instant Dominican Republic Lesley Gordon
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9

Insight Guide South Africa Melissa De Villers, Lesley Gordon
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10

Intimate Strategies of the Civil War Lesley Gordon
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11

mystery and magic of trees and flowers Lesley Gordon
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12

pageant of dolls Lesley Gordon
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13

Peepshow into paradise Lesley Gordon
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14

Poorman's nosegay; flowers from a cottage garden Lesley Gordon
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15

Sorrowful and not so sorrowful tales: monologues Lesley Gordon
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16

The Complete Guide to Drying and Preserving Flowers Lesley Gordon
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17

This terrible war Daniel Sutherland, Michael Fellman, Lesley Gordon
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18

Trees

Janet Pagter Johl and Rock Hudson

I was surfing looking for information about Janet Pagter Johl, still one of my favorite authors on dolls. I found out that Rock Hudson had a copy of one of her books. Go figure. All you have to do to find the link is to Google her name. I'd love to find out more information about her as a person. She also wrote a child's book called Whilemina the Little Dutch Girl in 1941.

Wednesday, March 23, 2011

Hakata Artist in Solidarity

In Solidarity with the people of Japan, we post a vintage postcard from The Museum's Collection.

Sunday, March 20, 2011

Of Dollhouses, The Titanic, and Artifacts

My husband led me to a fantastic Victorian doll house yesterday. After we chatted with a great couple who built it, we came home with VanVooren house, or VVV House, as I've dubbed it. It will join my growing neighborhood of doll houses, miniature buildings, shops, and shadowboxes. A Mr. Harold, or Harry? Dirk built some lovely furniture, too. It is fully lighted, which has always been my dream. The tiny bulbs glow cheerfully, and the whole family is enamored of it. It proudly sits on our living room table, and the wonderful doll family has been joined by a couple of cherished dolls from my miniature collection, including a bisque and cloth doll created by my friend, Violet Ellen Page. I dressed her, and made a little wig. She is wearing a black and pink bustle dress, with tiny flowers in her curls. I call her Marchpane, after the doll in Rumer Godden's novel, A Doll's House, but my Marchpane is not homicidal; she is much, much nicer. One of my tiny Badekinder is in the pink porcelain tub, where else? There are little rugs, and gorgeous blue rooms. There is silverware in the tiny drawers, and china and canned goods in the pantry and breakfronts. The living room is red and red velvet, my other favorite color scheme. I have many memories of my Aunt Rose's Victorian red room when I was little and staying at her house before and after school. How I loved the red velvet settee! There is a tower room, and there are many miniature dolls in the nursery, which has a yellow rug. Think, Yellow Wallpaper! This, though, is a happy house. Of course,I added a tiny ghost and one of my litte Xmas trees. There is a little birds nest in the eaves, and a porch swing and picnic table. It is too fanstastic to be believed! It joins, of course, Plantagenet House, built by my dad, also named for Rumer Godden's works, and the Japanese Doll house, and several other cabins, haunted houses, kit houses Dad built, the "apartments" made out of clementine crates, Dunham's Cocoanut House, my tin fiftes/sixties houses, Barbie Houses, Golden Girl Celtic Palace, Bratz rooms, Polly Pocket mini compact houses, Princess castles, Sylvanian Family house, etc.

I have many fond memories of sitting by my Dad's workbench when he was building Plantaganet house. It is painted in a color then called "Chinese Red," and the doors have brass lion knockers and porcelain knobs. Miniatures of all types fascinate me, and my little boy was enjoying explaining to me how this new house might be in HO scale. The doll houses never bore me; like real houses, there is always something to do with them. Mom used to knit and crochet for them, and she made tiny rugs out of my old socks. She was also good at making beds from cardboard boxes and dressing the dolls. We made little quilts together, and I loved making food from Play Dough and salt clay, especially fruits and vegetables. When I was ten, I saw Mott's Miniature Museum for the first time at Knott's Berry Farm. It is no longer there, but it was my special place for many years. I got very inspired, especially by the doll shop, loaded with tiny dolls of all types.

We also saw the exhibit of Titanic artifacts. It was moving, and sad. There is, of course, a doll head still on the ocean's floor, and it is featured in the film. There were many tiny items, and many belonged to those who died. I saved the boarding pass tickets, and my souvenir was a Heart of the Ocean necklace. We have a trunk with white star stickers, and other labels from the sister ships of the line that sailed on WWII ships. I also have dolls of some of the people on it, and a tin sign. I will hang the tickets and necklace with the sign.The best book I read about Titanic, and the most horrific, was Walter Lord's, A Night to Remember. My mother sailed to meet my dad in Europe on the Olympia, another ship by Cunard. Our history is tied to this doomed vessel, it seems. My best friend Greg, had an album with a contemporary photo of its sister ship Olympic in it, too. I wish he were still alive; he would have loved this exhibit.

The museum continues to grow and change while looking for a new and permanent home. I will post photos as they become available. Till next time. Happy dolling.

Thursday, March 17, 2011

A Bibliography of Doll and Toy Sources: Print-Mixed Media-Electronic-Musical-Artistic

After 17 years of work, my book is out! It looks lovely, and has a photo of my Goodyear Rubber Doll on the front, and more of my dolls on the back cover. There is a Table of Contents, and an index. I have a preface and introduction about the history of dolls and doll collecting, and there are good black and white illustrations throughout, many of dolls from the museum. Even as I type, there is a doll on an old Maude rerun, along with a doll house and other toys, and Harlan Coben frequently mentions dolls in his novels. I keep finding more good URLs, and even Kojack had a doll or two on. So, I will have a second edition! There will also be information for where you can buy the book, soon.

The Barbie/Lilli exhibit is up at a local museum. I finished the PowerPoint and will try to figure out a way to post it for everyone to read.

I've had a few days off to search for dolls, and have found some treasures. I found a nice 6 in. parian head, blonde, painted blue eyes with molded collar and gold trim. It is in the so-called "low brow" hairstyle, and it is one of the nicest heads I've seen. I also found some modern fairy fashion dolls and Blythes, and a tiny Nippon doll in original dress. There was a lovely resin doll, one of a kind, with a winsome, wistful face, and several handmade Easter dolls or Effanbee 7 in. babies in crocheted outfits. I also found a vintage ideal baby, 8 in., with its original dress. All of these were five dollars and under, even the head. It pays to look in far off places, and new antique stores and junk shops.

One shop did scare me; it is hardly ever opened, so I went in. The spring weather influenced me. It was dark, long, and narrow, and filled wall to wall with piles of things. It was a hoarders episode in the making, except all were collectibles, even antiques. But, there was no room to look, or walk, and the owner was standing chatting in the middle of the only passable isle. He had good ideas, once. I found the two little dolls I bought displayed in an old popcorn machine filled with vintage mass manufactured porcelain dolls and Barbies. But, hardly any were priced. He had no change, and no bags. He was full of clever comments, like, "those are sharp shoes; are you a tap dancer?!" Hardly. He apparently complains to the other shops in the area that he can't sell anything. Well, I don't criticize, but here are my tips: market, organize, have change, have bags and boxes, have a huge yard sale for the excess, donate more to charity for a tax credit, advertise, and keep your sense of humor to yourself. Just a few ideas. I felt sorry for the guy; he was helpful and knowledgeable about his things, but I don't think even the boys from American Pickers would have had a lot of hope in that place.

A moral to all of us who collect? Collect v. Hoard? Since when is store inventory hoarding, and since when is collecting in that category? Who knows?

I only know I never met a doll I didn't like, and the hunt is on . . . .

To the People of Japan, hit so hard and tragically just days after the Hina Matsuri Festival, The Museum sends its thoughts and prayers. Take care.

Sunday, March 13, 2011

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: Japan and the Tsunami

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: Japan and the Tsunami: "What a bitter and ironic world it is. Little did I know when I posted about the Hina Matsuri Festival that Japan would be hit by such catas..."

Japan and the Tsunami

What a bitter and ironic world it is. Little did I know when I posted about the Hina Matsuri Festival that Japan would be hit by such catastrophe so soon. My heart goes out to the people of Japan and New Zealand. After the trauma in Haiti, I had hoped there would be no more quakes. I lived in California and was in the 89 quake. It was not good. I even bought a doll that year, a large china head from the once legendary Indiana Antiques on 2nd street that had survived the 1906 quake. I saved many newspaper articles, and still remember the utter feeling of helplessness I had when the quake hit and I was on 280 going home. The huge metal signs were bending and large trees dipped their branches to the ground. The radio was playing "Shake, Rattle and Roll," and I thought I had blown all four tires. We couldn't call out, but people could call us in CA. We had bad tremors for days, and six months later, on the anniversary and exact moment of the 1906 quake, we had another earthquake. I actually stood at the San Andreas Fault line that summer. I think I was ready to come home after that.

Dolls seems to trival in light of these disasters, yet they are a comfort, and something to cling to, as are all things we love. They distract us, and help us cope. Today was somewhat glum; I missed the big doll show, but did set up with help a large exhibit of Barbie and Lilli at a local museum. It was very colorful; I will post photos soon. The program on Historical Women and a possible TV spot is coming up. It should be interesting, and I want to include some infamous as well as famous women.

May we all say a pray tonight for the people of Japan, and for all who live along the pacific. May the waves tonight be peaceful; may the earth be calm. Till next time.

Wednesday, March 2, 2011

Legacy Doll Museum, Billings

See, below; here are some links and information from the museum in Billings:

www.legacydollmuseum.com. There are great photos, and upcoming events, as well as newsletter information.



Legacy Doll MuseumPromoting Doll PreservationHome
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Links
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FAQ
March 2011 Antique Doll Collector Magazine Features Legacy Doll Museum!
On Dale's birthday, Feb 25, we got the March 2011 issue of Antique Doll Collector with a 7 pages full color article featuring The Legacy Doll Museum. We have copies for sale for $5.95 here at the museum. Please come and share in our excitement!2011 Roaring 1920s High Tea Event April 16! Buy your tickets now as they are selling fast. We expect to be sold out soon.
We are currently selling tickets to the April 16 2011 High Tea. Tickets are $15.00. The event is from 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm. We open at noon so feel free to come early to see the museum or get in a bit of shopping before the big even. We will likely be sold out in March so please send payment as soon as possible. The ticket includes the tea and snacks, 1920s presentation and admission to the museum on the day of the tea. It is a lot of fun. The Antique Doll Collector magazine is doing a featured article in March so there will be a lot of advertising for the tea and tickets will sell fast. We will be welcoming a Flapper doll into the museums perminent collection.

Mattel Liddle Kiddles first appeared in 1966 so Legacy Doll Museum is celebrating their 45th anniversary with a temporary display. These dolls never fail to inspire a smile.

Check out our December 2010 newsletter that outlines all the recent and future happenings at the museum.


The Legacy Doll Museum, located on 3206 6th Avenue North in Billings Montana 59101, is the brain child of an avid Billings doll collector. The museum houses an extensive collection of antique, collectible, and modern dolls. Vignettes such as Wash on Monday, Iron on Tuesday etc. as well as displays of 1800's doll accessories and toys will delight you. Toys and bears are displayed in scenes related to childhood. You will also see French Fashion dolls with their original trousseaus, German Character dolls, and Modern Hard Plastic dolls with complete wardrobes. Terri Lee, vintage Ginny, Shirley Temple, Gene, Cissy, Barbie, American Girl and many more. Over 500 dolls and 4,000 toys, accessories and playthings will delight your senses.

We have a huge gift and antique shop that we are adding to every week. The gift shop is the first room you enter from the street and there is no admission to shop. We are affiliated with the Billings Doll Hospital so please contact us about the repairs you need.

We look forward to helping scouts get their doll collecting, hobby and history patches. We are wheelchair accessible. Please give us a call if you need to make an appointment for another time, we are glad to meet you if you give us a week's notice.
HOURS & ADMISSION
We are open Thursday - Saturday Noon - 5pm. (If regular hours will not work for you call 406-252-0041 at least 5 days in advance and we can make an appointment for another day or time). Summer hours begin on June 15 2011.

Admission: Adult $5, Senior (60 & Over) $4, Children (3 thur 12) $3 There is no admission charge for shopping in the gift shop/antique store so please stop by often. We do not accept credit or debit cards. We do accept cash and checks for admission and purchases in the gift shop. We are wheelchair accessible.

Parking: The door to the museum is on the corner of Division Street and 6th Avenue North. Park on either side of Division & Alderson (free parking) or 32nd Street North (parking meters during the week before 5pm, you do not need to pay the meters on Saturday). We are located on the opposite end of the WMCA block.
©2007 Legacy Doll Museum

Tuesday, March 1, 2011

Hinamatsuri Japanese Doll Festival

Below is an article I found for the girls festival, celebrated March 3d. There is much more to come in honor of this festival, including a tribute to author Rumer Godden, author of Miss Happiness and Miss Flower.


Home
Old Japanese Hina Doll House #2 Hina Goten Palace

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All Items: Vintage Arts:Regional Art:Asian:Japanese:Dolls: Pre 1940: item # 67098

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Asian Art by Kyoko
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The Hina dolls palace is for the Japanese Girl's Day, Hina Matsuri festival. The Hina doll set that I grew up with was displayed in the steps style, which is a common way of displaying 15 dolls with furniture. I have never seen this type of Hina Goten (Palace) until I found several of these recently. It tells us how different things used to be (and still is to some extent) according to regions. The hina dolls were modeled after the Imperial Court from the Heian period (794-1192). The costumes are all made out of silk, the Empress' hair is a little messy and the Emperor's hair has some holes.
The dimensions of the palace are: 25 1/2”H x 17”W x 7 3/4”D
This is the tallest house that I have available, appears newer than the others and very solid among this kinds. Circa 1910 to 1940.

Assembling the house is easily done and all the pieces fit into the box shown, including the dolls, their pedestal and a removable stair and stair rail. All the hinges and nails are very tiny and a little rusty. I was very fortunate to acquire several of these rare finds all at once.