Children of Japan

Children of Japan
Courtesy, R. John Wright

The Jumeau 201

The Jumeau 201
Courtesy Theriault's and Antique Doll Collector Magazine

Hinges and Hearts

Hinges and Hearts
An Exhibit of our Metal Dolls

Google+ Followers

Tuxedo and Bangles

Tuxedo and Bangles

A History of Metal Dolls

A History of Metal Dolls
Now on Alibris.com and In Print! The First Book of its Kind

Alice, Commemorative Edition

Alice, Commemorative Edition
Courtesy, R. John Wright

Translate

Emma, aka, La Contessa Bathory

Emma, aka, La Contessa Bathory
Her Grace wishes us all a Merry Christmas!

Annabelle

Annabelle

Emma Emmeline

Emma Emmeline
Our New Addition/fond of stuffed toys

Cloth Clown

Cloth Clown

Native American Art

Native American Art

the triplets

the triplets

c. 1969 Greek Plastic Mini Baby

c. 1969 Greek Plastic Mini Baby
Bought Athens on the street

Iron Maiden; Middle Ages

Iron Maiden; Middle Ages

Sand Baby Swirls!

Sand Baby Swirls!
By Glenda Rolle, courtesy, the Artist

Glenda's Logo

Glenda's Logo
Also, a link to her site

Sand Baby Castaway

Sand Baby Castaway
By Glenda Rolle, Courtesy the Artist

A French Friend

A French Friend

Mickey

Mickey
From our friends at The Fennimore Museum

2000+ year old Roman Rag Doll

2000+ year old Roman Rag Doll
British Museum, Child's Tomb

Ancient Egypt Paddle Doll

Ancient Egypt Paddle Doll
Among first "Toys?"

ushabti

ushabti
Egyptian Tomb Doll 18th Dynasty

Ann Parker Doll of Anne Boleyn

Ann Parker Doll of Anne Boleyn

Popular Posts

Tin Head Brother and Sister, a Recent Purchase

Tin Head Brother and Sister, a Recent Purchase
Courtesy, Antique Daughter

Judge Peep

Judge Peep

Hakata Doll Artist at Work

Hakata Doll Artist at Work
From the Museum Collection

Follow by Email

Japanese Costume Barbies

Japanese Costume Barbies
Samurai Ken

Etienne

Etienne
A Little Girl

Happy Heart Day

Happy Heart Day

From "Dolls"

From "Dolls"
A Favorite Doll Book

Popular Posts

Jenny Wren

Jenny Wren
Ultimate Doll Restorer

Our Friends at The Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum

Our Friends at The Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum

Baby Boo 1960s

Baby Boo 1960s
Reclaimed and Restored as a childhood Sabrina the Witch with Meow Meow

Dr. E's on Display with sign

Dr. E's on Display with sign

Dolls Restored ad New to the Museum

Dolls Restored ad New to the Museum
L to R: K*R /celluloid head, all bisque Artist Googly, 14 in. vinyl inuit sixties, early celluloid Skookum type.

Two More Rescued Dolls

Two More Rescued Dolls
Late Sixties Vinyl: L to R: Probably Horseman, all vinyl, jointed. New wig. R: Effanbee, probably Muffy, mid sixties. New wig and new clothing on both. About 12 inches high.

Restored Italian Baby Doll

Restored Italian Baby Doll
One of Dr. E's Rescued Residents

Dolls on Display

Dolls on Display
L to R: Nutcrackers, Danish Troll, HItty and her book, Patent Washable, Mechanical Minstrel, Creche figure, M. Alexander Swiss. Center is a German mechanical bear on the piano. Background is a bisque German costume doll.

A Few Friends

A Few Friends
These dolls are Old German and Nutcrackers from Dr. E's Museum. They are on loan to another local museum for the holidays.

Vintage Collage

Vintage Collage
Public Domain Art

The Merry Wanderer

The Merry Wanderer
Courtesy R. John Wright, The Hummel Collection

The Fennimore Doll Museum

The Fennimore Doll Museum

Robert

Robert
A Haunted Doll with a Story

Halloween Dolls Displayed in a Local Library

Halloween Dolls Displayed in a Local Library

The Cody Jumeau

The Cody Jumeau
Long-faced or Jumeau Triste

German Princesses

German Princesses
GAHC 2005

A Little PowerRanger

A Little PowerRanger
Halloween 2004

The Island of the Dolls

The Island of the Dolls
Shrine to Dolls in Mexico

Based on the Nutshell Series of Death

Based on the Nutshell Series of Death
Doll House murder

Popular Posts

Total Pageviews

A lovely dress

A lovely dress

Raggedy Ann

Raggedy Ann
A few friends in cloth!

Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum, WI

Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum, WI
Pixar Animator's Collection

Little PM sisters

Little PM sisters
Recent eBay finds

Dressed Mexican Fleas

Dressed Mexican Fleas

Really old Dolls!

Really old Dolls!

Sunday, December 30, 2012

Mrs. Stella Thomas: A Memory

My travels have taken me all over the world; my educational travels are no different. At one point in the early 80s, I landed in Iowa City to study. At the time, we didn’t have Goodwill at home. We had it in California, where my family lived, and it was a huge treat to go there at Christmas to look for dolls. I liked to prowl around the IC store and then stop at the Amelia Earhart deli for coffee or breakfast. We had everyone in IC, and there were times you were not sure if the person you were seeing was a or a woman, or if your movie theater companion would emerge wearing a Mohawk when the lights came on—and it didn’t really matter. We all managed to get along, to class, and stay friendly. The trouble was Goodwill downtown didn’t have many dolls. I would find maybe one in the whole store. Finally, I got the courage to ask where the dolls were, and was given a flier for a doll show, that very weekend, right before graduation! It was a Doll Show and Sale at the home of Mrs. Stella Thomas. She lived on College, which was part of the downtown, but too far to walk, especially if one had shopping bags full of doll treasures. I called a cab, universally $2.00, and started off. In Mrs. Thomas garage, not too far from the park we liked, and our favorite Haunted Book Shop, home of National Velvet paper dolls, were dozens and dozens of dolls. Most were restored, some dressed in original clothes, the oldest dating from the fifties up to the contemporary early 80s dolls, now vintage themselves. There were undressed dolls I later learned would be given away to those interested in dressing them, and there were boxes and boxes of doll parts. I went to work. I found Miss Revlon types, full dressed with the high heels so hard to find. I brought home a Bam Bam for free; he needed an arm and counted as free “parts.” I found hard plastic dolls, and Baby Secret, a doll I had wanted in the sixties. I took home an undressed Crissy to dress. All told, I had four white garbage bags filled with dolls, and these I sneaked by my 84-year-old landlady, not that she would have minded. The dolls went home to the cases at my parents’ home. After that, I went to the dolls show every year I lived in IC, and took my mom with me. After that, we would call Mrs. Thomas, and visit. She and I looked forward to talking to each other. The antiques dealers tended to leave her alone; comp and bisque dolls were the rage. A few would show up at her garage, but they were modern bisques, and a few compo babies in need of serious repair. One dealer we knew was her friend; Theo would help her by pricing some dolls, and donating some of her own stock to sell. Theo was a nice lady, and she, too, would encourage those interested in all types of dolls to visit. I don’t know if the UFDC would have applauded her efforts. She told me that a couple of times, someone would criticize who the dolls were dressed. Mrs. Thomas and her friends used donated material to dress the dolls, and often made ties and ribbons from pieces of yarn. Undaunted, she replied to these nay Sayers, “If you’re old enough to comment and criticize how the dolls are dressed; you’re too old to be playing with them!” That should be a battle cry! There were also stories with the dolls; Mrs. Thomas told me one cloth bodied baby doll had returned to her at least twice, redonated so that she could have a new cloth body cover twice made for her. That dolls resides at The Museum now, never to be redonated again. Mrs. Thomas was a simple person; her home was a modest fifties ranch. Her son, a science teacher, lived with her. When she found out my mom was a teacher, she talked about him proudly and often to us. She wore her salt and pepper hair page boy length, and wore old fashioned horn rimmed glasses. She had a simple rain coat for cool weather, dark in color, and favored flowered house dresses, like my grandma wore in the sixties and seventies. She and her friends made the doll show a party, and would have lunch during the show, usually bologna sandwiches and apple pie and cookies. Theo told me she died about ten years ago or so at 91. Theo, to, is no longer with us, and another era in doll collecting history, at least mine, has ended. I recently took a trip to IC, and couldn’t help but think of her as I drove through the familiar streets. I like to think She, Theo, Mary Hiller, our friend Violet, and Mom are all together somewhere now, talking dolls, maybe dressing a few, reminiscing, and waiting for me. Happy New Year 2013.

Saturday, December 29, 2012

Marque and Rockwell

I was pondering my dolls, and one of the newest editions, a Repro A. Marque, and was struck by the similarity to a Grace Corey Rockwell head in my collection. I also recently read an article in Antique Doll Magazine about an "American Marque" that was, well, an "unmarked Marque" which strongly resembled the French Doll. Below is some catalog information on the A. Marque doll, examples of which were in collections of Dina Vierny, Mildred Seeley, and Dolls in Wonderland. Lot: 17. An Outstanding and Extremely Rare French Bisque Doll by Albert Marque 22" (56 cm.) Bisque socket head with highly-artistic sculpting achieved by a unique four-part mold used only for this doll,prominent definition of facial planes,softly-rounded nose,heart-shaped face with elongated slender throat,brown glass paperweight eyes,thick dark eyeliner,painted dark curly lashes,feathered brows,accented eye corners,shaded nostrils,closed mouth with petulantly-shaped lips,well-modeled pierced ears,original brunette human hair hand-tied wig,original uniquely modeled body with elongated tapered-shape torso,wide hips,undefined waist,composition upper arms,bisque lower arms with bisque attached-ball-joints at the elbows,separately sculpted fingers,wide upper thighs,elongated lower legs with shapely calves,elongated narrow feet. Condition: generally excellent. Marks: A. Marque (incised signature) 65 (inscribed number on head) Cauchoise (pencil signature on foot). Comments: France,circa 1916,the artistic doll was commissioned from and sculpted by the esteemed French sculptor,Albert Marque,for an exhibition presented by Parisian art patron,Margaine-Lacroix in her fashion boutique. It is believed that only about 100 models of the Marque doll were created,most bearing their particular number in the series,this being #65,and some still bearing the pencil notation on their foot describing their costume,this being Cauchoise,referring to French Normandy region of Caux,near to Rouen. The history of the doll from 1916 to 1943 is not known,although at some point it was acquired by the North Carolina antiquarian,Mr. Tipton,whose antique shop in Charlotte and summer shop in the luxury resort town of Blowing Rock,North Carolina presented prestige art objects. In 1943,Mr. Tipton sold this doll to its present owner who cherished and preserved for its next 67 years until its presentation at this auction (the name of this owner will be available to the buyer). The Marque dolls were presented at their 1916 Paris Exhibition in costumes of one of three major themes,this being from the theme of dolls in historical French costumes,namely Cauchoise (the other themes were French court and Russian folklore). Value Points: superbly preserved condition of the extremely rare doll,with outstanding quality of bisque and painting,original wig,perfect original body,original undergarments,signed shoes,and superb ivory silk faille costume with patterned flowers,black velvet ribbon trim,rose silk apron with lace edging,silk sash,earrings,cameo brooch. Realized Price: 160000 I have no pretensions of finidng the ultra rare original Marque, but am currently looking for good replicas and information about all things Marque. I read in a Coleman publication years ago that Andrew Carneghie commissioned Marque dolls for display, and that these cost almost 1000 in the early 1900s, a about 1914. This is a relatively late French bisque in the world of antique dolls, and it comes at a time when other French dolls are supposedly "in decline," though I've always thought even the later SFJB dolls were wonderful.
I include some photos from my files for comparison, and some information on Grace Corey Rockwell, who, like Marque, was an artist.
Here is a link from the Antiques Roadshow Guide to Collectibles, a Google book online, with info on dolls and in particular, comments on Rockwell dolls by the late Richard Wright: http://books.google.com/books?id=Nk14Us8-iCsC&pg=PA265&lpg=PA265&dq=grace+corey+rockwell&source=bl&ots=c-RMANwc0m&sig=L2IH2BeOV_NsH5ciV015ZsswCWY&hl=en&sa=X&ei=vCPfUMD1OoiFqgGQ-4CwAw&sqi=2&ved=0CDIQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=grace%20corey%20rockwell&f=false The site Items of Antiquity advertised a Rockwell doll for $5000; these dolls were usually made in the 1930s, about 16 years after Marque. From the site eloradollhouse.com, comes a repro Rockwell doll for 59.99. http://www.eloradollhouse.com/products.php?cat=85&pg=2
Here is a German database for old toys with information for a Rockwell doll sold by Julia auctioneers: http://www.historytoy.com/Rockwell-Grace-C_4 Database for Old Toys:

Friday, December 28, 2012

Doll Museum: Doll Museum: Nativity Sets and St. Francis

Doll Museum: Doll Museum: Nativity Sets and St. Francis: Doll Museum: Nativity Sets and St. Francis : When I was in grade school, my parents used to drive me past the Fist Baptist Church on Xmas Ev...

Doll Museum: More Doll History by Laura Starr; Dolls and Educat...

Doll Museum: More Doll History by Laura Starr; Dolls and Educat...: I still can't type well; bad hands. So, read but forgive! These are telling and important quotes the UFDC should adopt at p. 233 from Chapt...

Doll Museum: Nativity Sets and St. Francis

Doll Museum: Nativity Sets and St. Francis: When I was in grade school, my parents used to drive me past the Fist Baptist Church on Xmas Even to view the Live Nativity, which intrig...

Happy New Year and Photos from Cinicnatti; Long Awaited!

I was at an estate sale today, and ran into an old friend. She used to have a shop called De Kleine Winkle, or Little Store. Oh the dolls and antiques my mother and I used to find there, Nancy Anns mint in their original boxes, a 3' plust Minierva celluloid head, all original, dressed as a Scots Highlander, many art dolls and pieces of china, old lace, a 1920s photo in a guilt frame of a group of women dressed in 1880s styles. It was wonderful. She said she was glad to see I was still dolling, and I said, "Are you Kidding, till they haul me in a box to the cemetery! And even then, I may not stop!" That is my battle cry for 2013. At the sale I found a Marque replica, 24 inch, well made, and a lovely french replica, both wearing lavender silk and lace dresses and poitned french shoes on ball-jointed bodies, dressed in Golden Age stypes. I found a Chinba Poblana paointed, jointed cloth doll, similar to dolls from costa rica, and a Topsy Turvy girl from The Dominican Republic. There was a doll sized yuellow dperssion glass pitcher, and a ragtgedy andy made of rocks, a German beeswax angel, famious, and the manufacturer is escaping me now. These were very reasponaby priced, none more than 30.00 and some less than 10. I was selective, but there were some more collectible foreign dolls, all presented by my friend DT, the most honest person and antiques dealer, and a gentleman to boot. This was the first Xmas I did not get a doll, or for that matter, presents. I am not disgruntled; there are many good reasons for involving bills, many, many bills, surprise blizzards, surprise snow blowers, surprise car reparis, sands in the hour class dribbling too fast, relatives, inlaws, [good in laws], grades and finals week, etc. So, I am buying dolls and going to after Xmas sales when I can. Have done well with vintage Hallmark and Carlton, and Alexanders at discount stores. Found some beauties at Goodwill, and was able to dress and repair some of my dolls that have been waiting and languishing. I am constantly organizing and arranging The Museum, till we can find our permanent dream home. Here are some photos form Cinciniatti, all Ushabit, Cyclaid Idols, some African, expecially a bees was headed doll from the Sudan, the type my friend Mary Hillier researched and pictured in Dolls and Doll Makers. I've always marveled the wax dolls were made in such a hot climate. There will be more research on these dolls later, but for now, enjoy the long promised photos:

Tuesday, December 25, 2012

An Apologia for Countess Erzebet Bathory: Merry Christmas

An Apologia for Countess Erzebet Bathory: Merry Christmas: Please read below, and note that Erzebet's legal problems began at the end of the Christmas Season as celebrated in her time. Merry Christm...

Thursday, December 13, 2012

Bad Barbies

I first heard this on the morning news. It is interesting that the gang has chosen the name of a doll. They are also called "New York's Deadly Dolls." Since The Museum is interested in all aspects of how dolls fit into culture, especially American Culture, I had to note this piece. Dolls seem to infiltrate every aspect of human and activity. The darker aspects of humanity also include their doll references, as we have seen in past posts and studies for this and my other blogs. Just last week, Criminal Minds featured a mad puppeteer who was murdering people and creating marionettes from their bodies. We are back to Eva Simms essay"Uncanny Dolls" and her study of Freud and Rilke and the image of the doll and figure in their writings. My own "Dolls in Horror Movies" addressed the "deadness" of dolls, and discussed how a human body is disguised in the dolls that populate Clauda's bed in a scene from Interview with the Vampire. There was also a body displayed in a doll box in Medium. An odd but timely post for the season. I hope to blog more on current and popular dolls and toys. I always keep a Toys R Us ad because it features the latest and most popular examples. Target and other Big Box stores do the same, and the ad booklets are colorful, neat little time capsules of what was popular, just old Sears, JCP, Wards, and Marshall Fields catalogs are. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year, and Seasons Greetings and Happy Holidays to all. May you find the doll of your dreams--and peace--in 2013. The Miami Herald: Posted on Thu, Dec. 13, 2012 NYC police: 'Bad Barbies' gang terrorized streets The Associated Press New York City authorities say they have taken down a violent street gang whose female factions went by names including "Bad Barbies." Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said Wednesday that at its height, the Trinitarios gang had up to 100 female members. He said one was a 24-year-old involved in the fatal retaliatory shooting and in the shooting of a robbery victim outside a Mexican restaurant. An investigation of the gang has resulted in arrests of 119 people in the Bronx and Manhattan since 2009. Kelly and U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara (buh-AHR'-uh) announced the latest arrests on Wednesday at a news conference. Bharara said the gang would turn the streets in a "shooting gallery" if anyone infringed on its drug dealing or gun running.

Sunday, December 9, 2012

Dolls and Crossover Collectibles

Cross Collectibles Christmas is upon us again. The lights burn brightly everywhere, and there are decorations in every store. Ornaments of all types are in nearly all places of business. Collectors have field day this time of year. Along with Halloween, Christmas is the most celebrated and decorated of holidays, and there are serious collectors of its memorabilia. There are clubs and societies, like the Hallmark Ornament Collectors and The Golden Glow of Christmas Past, and Museums including the Christmas Museum. Year long retailers like S. Claus abound, and there are Jim Shore, Hallmark, Coca Cola ornaments, you name it. I’d like to blog about dolls and related cross collectibles. Crossover or cross collectibles can make an item more valuable than if it were collected by just one type of collector. I’d like to focus on a few categories, just to give everyone ideas. For the sake of being seasonal, let’s begin with Christmas ornaments. Collectors of Disney themed dolls and toys will find licensed Disney ornaments by Hallmark and other companies, including Disney itself. Jim Shore, himself a collected artists, makes Mickey and other Disney characters as figurines and ornaments. Snow babies made figurines featuring Disney characters as well. Target and Walgreen’s feature Disney Themed decorations and ornaments, and Sears and K-Mart also have in the past. There are also Harley Davidson ornaments, and ornaments representing rock stars. Walgreen’s carries a Gene Simmons ornament which dwells in our house. Barbie themed ornaments are made by many companies, and the most collectible are by Hallmark. In fact, Hallmark features Lionel ornaments, Star Trek and Star Wars, Nascar, Beatles, Madame Alexander, Peanuts, Harry Potter, Nightmare Before Christmas, Hot Wheels, and many more popular culture inspired ornaments in several sizes, some with light and motion features. All of these fit the description of a crossover collectible. Those who feature these themes in their collections will want the ornaments, too. Peanuts is an entire category of its own. Peanut character dolls and stuffed animals fit any type of Peanuts collection. Items can include clothing, jewelry, other figurines, books, videos, comic strips and original drawings, china, coloring books, etc. Madame Alexander has made some lovely Peanuts characters and Avon made bottles for kids and other cosmetics products featuring the characters in the sixties. I have two Skediddle Kiddles by Mattel that represent Lucy and Linus, and there were also Charlie Brown examples. Coca Cola collectors love the various dolls representing the Coca Cola ladies on the tray. These have been made as Barbies by Mattel and by Madame Alexander. There is also the Coca Cola Santa, and I have examples if miniature bottles and Coke Santa cutouts. The Coke cards attract the cola collectors but also those who collect playing cards exclusively. There are the Coke beanies of the 90s, and the various types of polar bears. Some of these also find themselves in Advertising collections and in Teddy Bear collections. Pepsi. Ditto with Coca Cola, and there are also 7-Up characters and collectibles. I have a large snowman dressed as a jester that advertises 7-Up. John Deere: This is hot stuff in the Midwest. There are also John Deere toys, which also fit farm toy categories, John Deere Barbie, Fisher Price John Deere figures, the vintage classic Johnny Tractor, board games, clothing, jewelry, etc. There are pieces of John Deere history that belonged to the family and ephemera of many types. Rock n’ Roll: There are whole series involving items that belonged to rock stars, from Michael Jackson’s glove, to John Lennon’s doodles and sketches. The Hard Rock CafĂ© features many of these as decorations, including musical instruments, like Jimmy Hendrix’s guitar. It also sells teddy bears, and there are those who collect nothing but HRC memorabilia. There are also dolls and action figures going back to the early days of Rock of the artists themselves. There are many Beatles figures, including sets of Bobbleheads, a category all its own, but which includes dolls. Shirley Temple herself is often collected. Doll collectors love these items as well, and besides the many dolls, collect books, videos, clothing, clippings about Temple and her life, blue glass with Shirley’s image, figurines, etc. Some will also collect the original books that influenced her movies, like Poor Little Rich Girl, Heidi and A Little Princess. I have a sweater with an Inuit girl on it that I will always keep; I had it on when I waited in line for Ms. Temple to sign her autobiography for me. She admired the sweater. I also have photographs of her doll collection when it was on display at Stanford’s Children’s Hospital. There is a film called Shirley Mania that talks about the Shirley Phenomena, and the Chili Victorian Museum and Doll Hospital has a huge Shirley collection. Read about it in back issues of Doll Castle News. Similarly, Kewpies, Raggedy Ann, Sesame Street and the Muppets, Hollie Hobbie, Betsey Clark, and Strawberry Shortcake are other dolls that have inspired many other products and collectibles that cross over. Celebrity dolls of all types are popular in collections of other objects, too. I have read about Elvis collectors, Marilyn Monroe collectors, Elizabeth Taylor collectors, even Charley’s Angel collectors, and there are dolls that represent all of them. There are many more celebrity dolls than have even been made before. With every film and cartoon, there are dolls and figures that represent the characters, everything from Lord of the Rings to Indiana Jones. Mythical figures like angels and mermaids have dolls made in their image, as well as clothing, lawn ornaments, jewelry, bottles, advertising products, etc. I have the Chicken of the Sea mermaid doll, and many angels from all over the world in many forms in my collection. One of my sub collections is towels and linens that feature items like this that I enjoy collecting. Unicorns and teddy bears inspire similar objects. Two collections that involve crossover objects that I love to search our are my Pocahontas and Alice in Wonderland collections. I have dolls, videos, books, drawings, ads, candies, purses, clocks, Halloween Costumes, Disney objects, jewelry, teapots and cups, plates, toy dishes, and all sorts of other objects. I have an engraved portrait of the real Pocahontas and Steven Tyler is an avid Alice collector as well. Since I’ve taught Alice, I have lots of teaching materials about her. When I took my prelims for my doctorate in English, I took them in my advisors office. He left his statue of The White Rabbit there to greet me. Also, to add to the crossover effect, Grace Slick, of Jefferson Airplane, who sang “Go Ask Alice” based on the book, is an avid doll collector herself. These are just a few of the categories of popular crossover collectibles. It would be possible to write a multivolume set on the topic. I haven’t even touched doll lamps and doll bottles, doll shoes, paper dolls and paper toys, doll quilts, paper dolls of characters and those based on real dolls. These are what make collecting fun. Merry Christmas and may your collecting dreams come true this year!

Friday, December 7, 2012

Toy Robots and Action Figures

Like many doll collectors, I have branched out to human-like objects and toys for some time. I love my robots; I had early Robbis and other Japanese robots and mechanical toys that belonged to my Uncle George. His son got many of them when he was born, and then they went off to the yard sale. I've replaced the one's I had, but also have many newer models, shared with my 14 year-old, but destined for The Museum all the same. Robosapien, Roboraptor, and Robopet are among are favorites. I can't help but think of all the great movie robots I've known and loved, including Robbie, R2Dt, Lost in Space, Rhoda the Robot Girl, the automaton in Hugo, etc. Below is something the Museum of Childhood is currently doing with robots and action figures. This is a site well-worth visiting, along with The national Museum of Play. I also have many listings of robot/automaton related sources in my books, With Love from Tin Lizzie: A History of Metal Dolls and Mechanical Dolls and A Bibliography of Doll and Toy Sources. Robosapien Robosapien burst onto the toy market just in time for Christmas 2004 and was crowned UK Toy of the Year that year, selling over two million in the UK alone. Robosapien is the first robot to be made using the science of applied biomorphic robotics - 'a fusion of technology and personality'. The robot was designed by NASA scientist, Mark Tilden who started working with robots in the 1980s. Robosapien moves by remote control. You can program Robosapien to move in all kinds of ways - he walks, strikes, throws, grabs and holds objects, dances and even speaks fluent 'caveman'. He will respond to a total of 67 commands including ones to belch and fart. In 2005 the one metre tall Robosapien V2 was launched. The V2 model is even more advanced than the original Robosapien and is able see colours, identify skin tones and hear and respond to noises. The same series of toys includes a Roboraptor, a Roboreptile and Robopet.

Treasured collections; an exhibition

For those who can visit the Museum of Childhood: A Treasured Collection 22 December 2012 – 1 September 2013 Museums collect, cherish and display objects of cultural, historical and artistic significance. On a smaller scale, many of us also collect, creating our own personal assemblage of significant objects, memories and keepsakes, which preserve our past and inform our future. What we consider valuable can be highly individual and varied from the truely mundane to the extremely precious. The things we keep reveal much about what we consider 'the important stuff' in life. Objects can provide a way of holding on to an intangible memory. A Treasured Collection is an exbuerant and eclectic installation of 'mini museums' made with adults and children. Their personal 'enshrined' stories provide an insight into the private art of collecting. The exhibition also features an installation by Jasleen Kaur who creates objects that travers cultural boundaries and subvert tradtional notions of use and a 'sound collection' by beat boxer Jason Singh.

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Doll Museum: Goddesses and Venus Figures an Update

Doll Museum: Goddesses and Venus Figures an Update: Here is a great site with history of these oldest of dolls or human figures: http://www.ancient-wisdom.co.uk/venusfigures.htm titled Ancien...

Memoir; Writing your Life Story: Lincoln's Proclamation of Thanksgiving

Memoir; Writing your Life Story: Lincoln's Proclamation of Thanksgiving: Happy Thanksgiving from Dr. E and all her Blogs! Proclamation of Thanksgiving Washington, D.C. October 3, 1863 This is the proclamati...

From S. Holbrook and Blog Issues

Below is a post from Theriault's, for those who enjoy hearing about them. The Thanksgiving wish is very nice. I am having a lot of trouble getting to my blogger dashboard to add posts and maintain my blogs. I can find them on the Internet, but signing in is becoming very difficult. I will do my best to rectify this mess. Enjoy the post below.
Dear Friends, First of all, as we creep towards Thanksgiving, which I can hardly believe is happening this week, let me be the first to wish you all a wonderful day with family and friends and, of course, to give our own thanks to you for the friendship and fun we share in dolls. This year seemed to go by in the blink of an eye. It was fun indeed! Over the past 11 months Theriault’s has handled nearly 30,000 dolls (that is a lot of transactions and happy collectors!) conducted over 30 events (that is a lot of logistics) and I have personally covered nearly 265,000 miles (with 228 days of travel) around the world to host, meet, and work with collectors from a bevy of towns, states, and countries. With that has come a year to be remembered and the success of Theriault’s biggest in sales in its 42-year history. With that said, the year is not done! Over the next few weeks we will finish off with our final three events of 2012 as we lead you into our famed January Auction Gala to start 2013 (and wait until you hear about that). Keep tuned to our schedule as in November/December we are racing down the stretch with four auctions in under 21-days. Whew! Oh, and January, well....you will get the details soon and it’s going to be an event like none other. Three days of auctions that will span throughout a two-volume catalog with nearly 1000 pieces. Best of all, the diversity it will offer is like no other January before in that it features the collections of four major figures who have been beloved in their circle of the doll world: Mary Young of Atlanta, Margaret George of Atlanta, Mary Marxen of Cincinnati, and Mildred Adkins of Louisville. Each brought their own personality and love of dolls into the world of collecting for decades and as a result will showcase a complete history of dolls in virtually every genre imaginable. I hope to personally see you in the coming weeks as we bring a close to a fantastic 2012 and a bright start to an exciting 2013. And next week we can all give thanks on our special American day for the joy and fun we get from doll collecting and, above all, the wonderful friends we make in this shared adventure. Happy Collecting and a Very Happy Thanksgiving, Stuart stuart@theriaults.com P.S. Just a quick reminder to join Theriault's Facebook page as we post interesting little tidbits there for collectors as well as regular contest giveaways!

Saturday, November 17, 2012

To the Muses of my Blogs

Our beloved Anne Rice has her People of the Page, and I have my readres/viewers, my extended family which I call The Muses of my Blogs. For this and my other blogs, I write for you, what I think you might enjoy or care about. I hope to start a cyber dialog of like-minded souls. If anyone wonders why I seldom get into political current events, the reason is that these blogs are a haven from the world and its turmoil. No matter how I want to rant, I remember that I retreat to my books and to the blogs I read for sanctuary, and sometimes for escape. This Thanksgiving, may God Bless us all, however we chose to envision or worship God. May we have peace in 2013, and may the world go on and on. In times of horror and turmoil, I'm reminded that art, including dolls, crafts, music, writing, dance, and popular culture, manage to survive. Even if the rest of us can't So go out and create, and be unique, and be yourselves. More later on material cultural studies, doll museum displays and research, and other holiday ideas. Catch me on my other blogs as well, and take good care.

Thursday, November 15, 2012

Where else can you find Dr. E's Doll Museum?

You can find us on Twitter, hashtag "Dr. E's Doll Museum." Facebook: Dr. E's Doll Museum We show up on Linked -in under my name, too. or Dr. E's I'm on Pinterest as well, and I have an author page at 918studio.com and Amazon.com. Thanks!

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

The East Coast and What Doll Collectors Did before Doll Shows and eBay

We would like to send our prayers and best wishes to all our friends on the East Coast hit by Sandy. Special greetings go out to Obscura, The Strong National Museum of Play, The Museum of the City of New York, The Brooklyn Doll and Toy Museum, and the Chili Victorian Doll Museum and Doll Hospital. We also send greetnigs to our friends at Doll Castle News, and want them to know we are sending gifts for holidays to the children of The Sun Valley Indian School.
Please forgive any typos; again, there is no spell check, and my hands are bad.
So, where did we go before Doll Shows, Antique Malls, and eBay/online auctions? How did we collect? Here is my own collectors memoir, which chronicles where the dolls of Dr. E's Doll Museum came from. I have been collecting actively since I was three years old, and reding doll books since age 7, beginning with John Nobles delightful, Dolls, and moving on to Mary Hillier's Dolls and Doll Makers at age 9 and Helen Young's The Complete Book of Doll Collecting at age 8. I also read story books like The Most Wonderful Doll in the World, Dolls by Bettina, The Lonely Doll Books, The Little House Books, Flora McFlimsey and The Dolls' Christmas, as a well as all of Rumer Godden's doll stores [More about Godden and the MMLA papers I did on her and F.H. Burnett later and on my other blogs].
Well, here is where my collecting journey began.
1. Antique Shops, including our own Wagon Wheel Antiques, Ann's Antiques, The Chelsea Shop, The Light House, Old Toll Gate Antiques, Johnny I got for You, and Robert's Trading Post. I was six or seven when I went to my first shop; they were open evenings in our downtowns with the rest of the stores. I began to go with my mother to other shops in California and New Mexico, and we began to look for them on trips. One of my favorites, no longer open, was a store in Colorado called The Fallen Angel. Another was called The Boardwalk Antiques, and was in Wyoming. Indiana Antiques in San Jose was just terrific, and there was, of course, Ralph's Antique Dolls who used to visit our Masonic Temple show from MO. I used to find small all bisques, frozen Charlottes, pincushion dolls, some comp and celluloids, ethnic dolls native to the region of the shop.
2. Through Word of Mouth and by visiting doll hospitals. I asked people; when little, I wasn't shy. We could visit some of the local doll museums, 2 0r 3 operating out of local homes and garages, and some of the doll hospitals. People brought dolls for me, and I saved my own. My grandmother had a collection of foreign dolls, and the those not yet given to me are at her house residing with my aunt and uncle. Once in a while, we read a newspaper ad, and called to visit a home where someone was selling dolls.
3. Department Stores of all types. Everyone locally had fantastic doll and toy departments, some with vintage larger than life blow ups of little girls of the fifties and sixties playing with dolls. There were Madame Alexander dolls and Vogue dolls everywhere. Furga was at Sears, and Lenci and Nancy Ann were still making dolls. Bradley silk-face Korean dolls in gorgeous dresses were at big stores, and even at Walgreens. The old Zayre's, Turnstyle, Arlan's and Thriftown were known for unusual dolls and toys. They had Barbie everythig and Little Kiddle finds were a feast for they eyes. We also had Carson Pierre Scott for awhile, and they displayed miniature rooms once comprable to the Thorne Rooms. There were displays of dolls everywhere as props in furniture stores and in Sears, and as displays in the windows of businesses and travel agents. One store had moving store Holiday Displays at Christmas and Easter that rivaled those of bigger cities. I loved a goat family vignettte, where a baby goat, or I guess, a kid, kicked his little feet under a baby blanket as his little crib rocked. These were unveiled the day after Thanksgiving for years, and it was a huge, huge deal. The Xmas displays of ornaments were also very special and to die for.
4. Gift Shops; those that sold papergoods were the best. They imported dolls and miniatures from everywhere. Hardware stores followed the tradition, and a few locally still have toys, and even Dutch Doll displays in the spring. Also, you could buy Goebel and Limoge figurines, and special items. Museum gift shops had Native American Dolls and artist made creations. One gallery had an annual Xmas fair. Another museum displayed a tree full of dolls.
5. Hobby Stores, real ones, had doll parts and store displays of papier mache dolls that looked like they were inspired by Queen Anne's. There were doll clothes on little hangers, and doll parts, mosly vinyl, but some made of plaster for The Three Wisemen dolls. There were also models, like Aurora's Bride of Frankenstein, which I passed up to my regret even today, and Vampirella. Miniatures of all types for doll houses and trains abounded.
6. Five and Dimes and other Drug Stores; they always had cool miniature plastic dolls and doll dresses, also hanging on their own hangers. Kresges would import Italian dolls in all shapes and sizes, and there were dresses even for PeeWees, and some carried old stock and doll clothes you could cut and sew from a yard of cloth.
7. Trips; we always brought back dolls, from states on the East and West Coast, Canada, Mexico, Europe, Japan, South Africa, even a souvenier pebble from the route The Beagle. The tourist and folk dolls were fine with me, and dolls came from International Museum Shops, the UN, on one occasion, State Parks, The Rastro flea market in Spain, the Monasteraki Flea Market in Greece, airport shops, roadside stops, more antique stores and later on antique malls, a few in out of the way places that were a bit like something from a Flannery O'Connor story. I remember names of places long gone here, too, India Imports, Santa Cruz Imports, Mark Farmer Co., The Chelsea Shop in Ghiradelli Square, The Importer, Whiteway, Pixie Toys, Vann's Craft and Hobby, The Marionette Doll Shop, etc.
8. As souveniers; see above.
9. As gifts from others; I got a lot of great dolls on my birthdays and other occasions, Bisque Nancy Anns, occupied Japan babies, Vogue's Little Imp, Scooter and Skipper, a few family dolls, those that were left after the War when my family got stuck in Europe, childhood dolls of neighbors passedon to me. My Uncle Tony, babysiters husband, who went to auctions and brought dolls, including Patsy and a big, mint A and E bride, also a piano bay, my first, when I was 8, and first started playing the piano. My gradeschool principal, a former superintendent, and my piano teacher all had doll collections; I had lots of inpsiration.
10. There were not many yard sales when I was growing up, and charity thrift shops were not that popular, but I made it to a few, and came back with dolls. After a doll give a way in my house, I did very well.
11. Catlogs and Mail order, including the Doll of the Month club. I did not belong to that, but have dolls that came from there with their boxes and the foreign coin sent with them. Gas stations gave dolls as premiums, and Old Elpaso and others sold dolls for a dollar or a box top or two. There were dolls in cereal boxes, and lots of premiums to send for. My mom did buy some books for me on history and some kids books with doll stories from the doll of the month club.
12. We made them and dressed them. My mom dressed one of my dolls in new clothes, up do the day she died four years ago. It was a family tradition. My grandma helped make them and dress them. I made them from literally everything. Paper dolls were everywhere, and we even made Kleenex dolls similar to cornhusk dolls, apple dolls, more cornhusk dolls, corncob dolls made from a neighbor's field, rag dolls, clay and playdough dolls, wax dolls, cotton ball dolls, dirt dolls, soap shaving dolls, carved soap dolls, the list is endless.
So, maybe we'll get ideas to think outside the box. I got to my first doll show at age 13; to my first antique mall in my twenties. eBay came along much later, along with all other online possibilities. Yet, we had Marshall Fields and the Toys of the Hour catalog, and finding dolls was a fun hunt and challenge. I had and still have a huge collection, but mine started when I was very little.
I guess my friend Mary Hillier was right; Dolls are wher you find them!

Tuesday, November 13, 2012

Miss Charlotte Bronte meets Miss Barbara Pym: Laura

Miss Charlotte Bronte meets Miss Barbara Pym: Laura: Here is some is some information about Laura Ingalls Wilder; I've been privileged to visit some of the historical sites and have a good coll...

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

Doll Museum: The Early 19th Century and the History of Paper Do...

Doll Museum: The Early 19th Century and the History of Paper Do...: Now it is time to return to our doll chronology by turning to the early 19th c. We last discussed a baby house beloning to Ann Sharp, Queen ...

Monday, November 5, 2012

Emma's Dolls

I missed posting on Halloween/Samhain. Life has become out of control around the museum, though we did put in a proposal for a brick and mortar building, which is pretty good if we do say so ourselves. Emma cat is lying next to me, all cozy and curled up with her dolls, and catnip mousies. We have our favorites, especially "the doll on a stick" and "marionette mouse." She sleeps with about ten little stuffed dolls for kitties and stuffed mousie toys. My late, great Opie loved sleeping on the legs of a large muppet Animal doll, and also was fond of a stuffed cow. I couldn't do move them without upsetting him. He also loved to sleep in a Victorian doll bed, with a couple of dolls. Daxie, our outher late, lovely cat, enjoyed stuffed mousies and sleeping with Beanie Babies. He also loved curlingup under the Christmas Tree. My labradoodle brother in law Dean Martin, loves his dog dolls, and carries them around to show me, especially the one's I've given them. My late puppy dog Killer, a scotty/poodle mix, hated dolls, and more than once, I found him with a death grip on Raggedy Ann, but he had his own squeaky dolls, lambs, and a plush dog. Like FDR, I kept some of his toys. He once retrieved a squeaky monkey and jumped on the bed where my Mom and I were viewing at the day's catch from a doll show. Smokey loved his white teddy bears, and he had his own. He liked sleeping on some of the old compo dolls, and loved scented stuffed animals to curl up with. He slept on Dinosaur, a flat, T-Rex pillow. When he died of natural causes, I buried him with Dinosaur. Animals have their toys, too. I remember and episode where Lassie got a doll that she loved very much. I have to wonder what they are thinking. Many new dolls on the collecting front, and many great auctions. I hope to post more photos soon, and to include more stories and information about dolls. What are your favorite Christmas dolls and ornaments? Do you make them? Do you make paper angels or cotton ball snowmen? I would love to know what holiday traditions exist with regard to doll making and doll collecting.

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

From The Doll Book/Laura Starr-Dolls and Education

These are telling and important quotes the UFDC should adopt at p. 233 from Chapter 25, The Educational Value of the Doll: "What topic yet proposed for the education fo the young is not in part at least illustrated by doll study? A knowledge of history, geography, folklore, tadition of peoples, their poetry, music, sentiments, dances, social religious festivals are essential to the education of broad mindd individuals'. How better can these things be taught to children than to make object lessons of the mannikins that represent types and clsses of various ountries? Dolls have a social and religious significance; fundamentl principles, which undrlie folklroe and traditions, are embodied and set forth by dolls, which the majority of people look upon simply as children's toys." Starr refers to a pamphlet by G. Stanely Hall and A. Cassowell Ellis of Clark Unviersity, MA, published int he early 1900s asking certan data of response of childrent o objects representing a baby or child. Questions were: 1. With ragard to kind of doll, of what material it was made, etc. 2. The feeding of dolls, what kind of food and how given. 3. Medicine an disease were treated, what remedies were given adn how. 4. What constituted the death of a doll, funeral services and burial. 5. Details of psychic acts and qualities ascribed to dolls. 6. Information wanted re doll names, accesories, toilet articles, furnishings. 7. What did children think of doll families, doll discipline, hygiene, and regimen, rewards and pubnishments; how dolls are put to sleep. 8. What is the influence of dolls on children? etc. 9. Is there regularity and persistency in the care of dolls? etc. See p. 230-231 in Starr. The book is available on eBay and Amazon, and on Kindle.

Memoir; Writing your Life Story: The Yellow Brick Road; Memoirs of Autumn

Memoir; Writing your Life Story: The Yellow Brick Road; Memoirs of Autumn: My friend's sloping driveway was covered in several inches of glowing gold leaves today. It looked like The Yellow Brick Road. It is 80 y...

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Tonner now Takes PayPal

I love Tonner, but I only have one. They are very well made dolls, if a little pricey , but still well worth collecting. Here is the latest newsletter, with information re their new PayPal acceptance. Enjoy!
Tonner Doll Paypal Now Accepting PayPal From: Tonner Doll Company To: etsag1998 Date: Tue, Oct 23, 2012 1:36 pm Having trouble viewing this email? Click here http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?llr=b8clxgcab&v=001Qll-Xe3DdxHqK5lM72iXg4SNDaWckDKhYw4orH0kPghYpjBk-t6TyhszBGaW9pNXRn_qtEVAI059ZL6iFz5j8EELhHeY2Lm8EyskodELoTZnZXHmmy6QziaWZoYoI9AQ-pRZX_tD8lTZkZSBTq5AD9wxV34Fb8iQ_FLAl-gaJwiXHHYErmaCiAGLFDvOBVTiWfBYq8-QwTgX5l79SaH85tn1bvRfG5fVlnNG4UPKUZ9_ITJsYIGCQYmhTgAhhggfRSPV1HXjJ7c%3D Tonner Logo w/ reg symbol [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?e=001TwoBGes4DlPOqb14kh91QduF7XdH_hG5GjJQClS5B8YoAI3Zq0PNFOLQKP-BxkrOFukV-eefcp_eQSyMdQWcs6nZG_qnjmRtBMlzkBOPhLehPpUkRLjECw==] ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Hi Collectors! Just a friendly note to let you know that we are pleased to again be offering PayPal as a form of payment! Simply select PayPal as the payment method at checkout, and follow the instructions from there. Happy Shopping, Team Tonner ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Find us on Facebook [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?e=001TwoBGes4DlN5CjeeFMEmlBRd7SKxGpjVUMPzd4yyBYw2JUMbeeOOH0zXIhxoOI_8Qb6o6NOyl_Tmh4wt8G-U_3otydCfr0S6eS3loQKOB2_bIt8GdNu6SM5R8meXRQEq] Follow us on Twitter [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?e=001TwoBGes4DlP-7tDY_AzLRHqj_xwVLNyNIECMfn_RrFaqTJ_Htengc8yJTHjDXTRR166YleKuu8FjqmqCcwTXPF9o5RbJGMSL_DlobpdmJmKQoexWi9ZY7sF0F0dzLW4X4HX6y_boqVo=] View our videos on YouTube [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?e=001TwoBGes4DlNyLK4iGVe2EUqlEXa8LUgbcTZXghrcT1AmOQAfunEZkRcdyg4AaQ1-mZDePuoMnYxprzgjO7lxkPqsp6-vHnAg-tjU3L8IRuCj_MC2PeHYMZHSTMql98aRnssLwrG84CofTONJGRKJe73QtmwRW1b8mcF9RL_1tG8=] Visit our blog [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?e=001TwoBGes4DlMOLphxOaVjTyTuejg-7nCl85ayKij0xuDKFBt3TwEeqGq2Sg5rzX8Nc4VqVliwXF0IQXE49Yx4gM3SHnMb5Z3vUm9TAoxNabt4DvdDHIarrgpYf1ufTqQT] Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, You Tube, and our Tonner Blog! ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Forward email http://ui.constantcontact.com/sa/fwtf.jsp?llr=b8clxgcab&m=1101884918625&ea=etsag1998@aol.com&a=1111349357002 This email was sent to etsag1998@aol.com by tonnerdirect@tonnerdoll.com. Update Profile/Email Address http://visitor.constantcontact.com/do?p=oo&mse=001P3AZIpApn2BdrvJb1dNyIhic73CtXuXAOKRYvxfL3FU%3D&t=001zwpjL1DEjf-SsujF0N7vIQ%3D%3D&reason=001IqezpQbqEsU%3D&llr=b8clxgcab Instant removal with SafeUnsubscribe(TM) http://visitor.constantcontact.com/do?p=un&mse=001P3AZIpApn2BdrvJb1dNyIhic73CtXuXAOKRYvxfL3FU%3D&t=001zwpjL1DEjf-SsujF0N7vIQ%3D%3D&reason=001IqezpQbqEsU%3D&llr=b8clxgcab Privacy Policy: http://ui.constantcontact.com/roving/CCPrivacyPolicy.jsp Online Marketing by Constant Contact(R) www.constantcontact.com Tonner Direct | 301 Wall Street | Kingston | NY | 12401

Monday, October 22, 2012

Doll Museum: more on the 18th c.

Doll Museum: more on the 18th c.: I have been studying a lot on 18th c. dolls lately; here is a useful bibliography on the Queen Anne Period: BIBLIOGRAPHY OF QUEEN ANNE...

Wednesday, October 17, 2012

English Half Doll Collection on YouTube

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1HyxcZwWnfw

Above Link is a very good story about a collection of half dolls, including an unusual Wimbledon tennis player from YouTube.

I hope you like it.

Monday, October 15, 2012

Doll Trends and Market Musings

I just read tips of ineffective bloggers in a ProBlogger newsletter. This is a wonderful source for those who blog, but I confess I have sinned. First booboo is typos; again, I apologize for mine, but I have no spell check and have arthritic hands and fingers, albeit at a young age. Having said that, I thank profusely the 40,000 some people who view/read this and my seven other blogs. I thought I would comment on trends in collecting. I now the good advice is to buy "only the best," and to invest in "high end dolls," whatever that may mean. Certainly, if one can by an A.T. all original, do it. If you can find The Sunshine Family or a set of Mme. A Little Women MIB, do it! But, locally, in our MW region, and from what I see on eBay and Etsy, I note that all dolls seem to do well. The dolls at Tuesday Morning, collectors barbies, current Alexanders, Goetz, fly off the shelves. My mom and I have shopped there for years, and are on a first name basis with the staff. They tell us that when the newsletter goes out, and the Alexanders come in, people stand in line, and the dealers/collectors/doll speculators are first in line and leave with their arms full. At a recent estate sale, I stood in line to get in, twice, and the dolls were all scooped up. The same thing happens when my friend DT does sales. These dolls are mostly German, many A and M, and several in are in doll parts. Doll clothes sell immediately. China doll heads and bisqe heads sell in any condition. Annalee dolls are crossover collectibles, and don't last past the first hour of any sale. At thrift shops, CPK dolls in any condition do very well. One of my best friends collects them avidly, but she is not the only one scooping them up. Barbies are fewer and fewer at our Goodwill and Salvation Army. We have some OOAK artists operating in my area [more about that in another blog] and several seamtresses who make custom clothes for Barbie, her friends and clones. The SA is carrying more dolls, especially vintage 60s and 70s. Artists reproductions of antique dolls don't last long, either. These usually have very nice dresses. One friend of mine who is now a dealer sets up twice a year in a local park. She has mainly foreign dolls, some vintage HP, many sixties to eighties dolls, some compo. She has a fiew of the Franklin and Heritage Mint editions, too. If I don't get there early, I have to stand in line and the dolls are gone. Nancy Ann storybook and the upbiquitous "Suzie Sweeheart" or "Dress me" dolls have actually gone up in price. These have nostalgic value; they are the first dolls many girls collected in late 40s to sixties, and they were brought to an art by Carlson Dolls, Gambina, and other companies. They also were instrumental in teaching little girls to sew. I loved ordering them from Patio Tacos, and getting them at Gas Stations as premiums when I was little, and who didn't live the Doll in the Dome, encased in a plastic bell. I see a lot of people selling dolls of all types now again at yard sales; these sell as do many types of stuffed animals. I recently bought a Steiff panda, jointed, newer, with all tags and buttons for 5.00. I bought the Steiff yellow lab for about $1. I see bisque figurines selling more than I used to, especially Lefton. Several new antique shops have sprung up, and can't keep dolls in stock. The dolls range from composition, to Skookums, folk cloth [I lost out on a great one last week!], artists cloth, Effanbee repro Patsy's of the 90s; newer Ginnys, and Alexanders. There are also some Annette Himstedt, and I found wonderful Sashas at a craft mall last year. We have people making art dolls of all types from vintage parts, and many reproduction heads and parts are used. These genre has given doll collectors whole new categories. These items are hot, and don't stay on the shelves long. Almost everyone I talk to has some dolls at home, or likes to make them. They don't consider themselves collectors, but the trends are very interesting. Reasonably priced dolls are doing well, and even broken vintage and antique dolls are in demand. I've even seen men vying for them. Doll clothes and accessories, character dolls, Barbies and action figures have a devoted following, too. It just proves again that "All dolls are collectible!" I've always thought with any collection, the whole is greater than the sum of its parts, even though we all have our collectible stars. Happy Dolling, and you don't have to break the bank to enjoy the hobby!

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: The Pewter Headed Huret

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: The Peter Headed Huret: Good Morning! I am looking for any information and photos about the whereaouts of this doll. It was once in the Maureen Popp collection, a...

The Pewter Headed Huret

Good Morning! I am looking for any information and photos about the whereabouts of this doll. It was once in the Maureen Popp collection, and as far as I know, Dorothy Dixon was her last owner. I would like a photo of the doll for my book on metal dolls, currently listed on Google books, and about to go into print. I am interested in buying the doll if it is for sale, or in any other dolls like it. There was a story about Huret dolls done in 3 parts in Doll News in the late 80s. I think the dolls wears a blue gingham type dress, and has a white linen or cotton hood on her hair. She is wigged and has painted features, and looks like the bisque Hurets in many respects. Any information is greatly appreciated. Also, I would like photos of dolls by Lucien Vervelle, who had a metal head doll patent in France in the 1870s, or of any pewter heads like those in the late Gladys Hils Hilsdorf collection. I also welcome photos or information of other metal dolls, metal heads, mechanical dolls, toy soldiers, mechanical/talking/mamma dolls, animatrons, dolls with metal parts, automatons, or marionettes. Also weclome information or photos about the Edison phonograph doll. I am intersted in buying one, even if it is in parts. Thanks to all who read my blogs! Happy Autumn!

Monday, October 8, 2012

Great Site-Antique Doll Collectors Online

See below; This is a great site to post dolls to be identified, and to comment on dolls. There is also doll sale information. There are also photos and other tidbits that are useful and fun. And, it is free and friendly! There's new information at antiquedolls-collectors-onlineadvisors.com, submitted by folks with the same interest in this topic as the two of us. You can read it here... http://www.antiquedolls-collectors-onlineadvisors.com/kestner-7-166.html Feel free to comment on any new contribution. Please tell your friends so they can give feedback, too. And, of course, you can contribute again to antiquedolls-collectors-onlineadvisors.com whenever you like. Your submissions mean a lot to me, and to other visitors to the site. http://www.antiquedolls-collectors-onlineadvisors.com/with-love-from-tin-lizzie-a-history-of-metal-heads-dolls-with-metal-parts-and-automata.html Best regards, Merle antiquedolls-collectors-onlineadvisors.com P.S. You requested this notification when you submitted your contribution. To stop receiving notices, click on the unsubscribe link below... http://www.antiquedolls-collectors-onlineadvisors.com/dyn/C2/Unsubscribe?domain=antiquedolls-collectors-onlineadvisors.com&author_id=21234795

Friday, October 5, 2012

China Heads

Here is the eBay guide article to china heads. I might add that old china has a gray cast to it; when you handle enough dolls that gray, luminescent cast is unmistakeable. There are also tiny imperfections that vary; they look like little beauty marks, and are actually kiln dirt. These appear in antiques; I've never seen them in reproduction The best reproduction I have is now 45 years old and came from The Tinkerbell Toy Shoppe in Disneyland. She is really something, even when placed next to a good antique. Read below and enjoy. Mona Borger's books are also good on the topic.
Antique China Dolls - dating and detecting repros : eBay Guides Reviews & GuidesGuidesReviews Reviews & Guides Home page Write a guide Guides by: dturnersan( 5983) 321 out of 346 people found this guide helpful. Guide viewed: 79659 times Tags: china doll | antique doll | antique | history | porcelain
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The goal of this guide is to help antique doll collectors and sellers judge the age, possible country of origin and authenticity of china dolls. eBay is a fine venue for collecting and selling antique china dolls , however many offered for sale are misidentified. It is common to find vintage reproductions being described as antique, and antique dolls dated much earlier than their real age.
The early years, rare beauties: •The earliest and rarest of the antique china dolls date from the 1840s and were made by pioneer porcelain makers such as German companies KPM Berlin (Konigliche Porzellan Manufaktur c.1763 -present) and Meissen (1710 - present), and Royal Copenhagen of Denmark (1775 - present). These china dolls are of the highest quality. China dolls from this early period seldom show up on eBay. They are highly desirable and command the highest prices. KPM Berlin, Meissen and Royal Copenhagen products were always marked inside the shoulder plate with the company signature. If unmarked then they are not made by these companies. KPM Berlin dolls are distinguished by a red line on the edge of the eyelid, but no line in the eyelid crease. It should be noted that Royal Copenhagen reissued 3 models of china shoulder heads starting in 1978 that were based upon their original 1840s models. The male version of these reissues is only marked inside the back of the shoulder plate. The 2 lady reissues have the word Denmark and 3 wavy blue lines on the outside and the model numbers inside. There were 3 models reissued, a 5 1/2" shoulder head of a lady with bun, a smaller lady with bun, and a boy the same size as the latter. It was a small production run that was only made for a couple of years. These more modern versions are hard to find and are desirable, however they are not as valuable as the original antique ones and should not be confused with them. The Royal Copenhagen example below, on the bottom left, is one of the reissue heads.
Other early companies followed. Most in Germany (A.W.Fr.Kister, Limbach, Kestner, etc.), Poland (TPM, Carl Tielsch), Czechoslovakia (Schlaggenwald), France (Jacob Petit and others), and Sweden ( Rorstrand ). There is debate about whether England produced certain china dolls as well. Note that there were literally hundreds of small porcelain manufacturing companies springing up by now, and many of them made china dolls, so this list of manufacturers is just the tip of the iceburg.
•The china dolls from the 1840s - 1850s can be found with a variety of hairstyles, such as the Lydia style with long ringlets almost to the shoulder, the Greiner style with shorter hair and exposed ears similar to the papier mache Greiner dolls, and the lady dolls with swoops of hair on either side pulled back into a bun.
The middle years, peak popularity:
•In the 1850s and 1860s the popularity of the china head dolls grew. More styles by more companies were available, though the most common was the covered wagon hairdo. Most came from German companies such as A.W.Fr.Kister, Kestner, Kloster Veilsdorf, Limbach, and Conta & Boehme, among others. Hair styles became more varied and elaborate, some were made as portraits of famous ladies such as Jenny Lind. Special features such as glass eyes, and the so-called Motschmann type bodies were sometimes made. The French companies Rohmer, Barrois and Huret marketed some fashion dolls in china, though most were in bisque. Again, this is not a complete list of all the companies producing china dolls.
•From the 1860s and 1870s, to the end of the 19th century, the companies Alt, Beck & Gottschalck, C.F.Kling and Hertwig joined the ranks of china doll producers. Alt, Beck & Gottschalck was probably the most prolific manufacturer. Some blond chinas and male dolls were also produced during this time. A few black chinas were also made. The faces became more childlike with rounded cheeks. The most common hairstyles were the high brow type and flat top style. 1860s -1870s china head dolls The late years, decline: •By the end of the century the popularity of china dolls was losing out to the bisque dolls. Most china dolls of this period were modeled as children. C.F.Kling continued to make chinas during the end of the 1800s. Hertwig continued into the first quarter of the 1900s, but the quality of china dolls declined in the early 1900s. The most common hairstyle was the lowbrow type. Hertwig introduced Pet name chinas in 1895, usually placed on cloth ABC or flag bodies. Dolls of this era are the type of china most often seen on eBay. Also the trading company Bawo & Dotter contracted with both Hertwig and Kling to make dolls for them. The low brow chinas continued to be sold as late as the 1930s-1940s.
•In 1890 the McKinley Tariff Act was passed, requiring imported goods to be permanently marked with the country of origin, The Act went into effect in 1891. Therefore, if a doll head is impressed with the word "Germany" it dates no earlier than 1891. In 1921 the Act was amended to require the addition of the words "made in". Any dolls impressed "Made in Germany" date after 1921. The Act was also amended in 1917 to allow imports to be marked with a rubber stamp or pasted label. Those labelings often didn't withstand the passage of time and are now unmarked. Most of those items were made in Japan, though they previously used the Nippon mark. Goods that were made for domestic use in Europe or Asia wouldn't have had to comply with that law. •There were a few high quality china head dolls produced during the first quarter of the 1900s. Dressel & Kister made fine figurines, half dolls and some shoulder head dolls. Nymphenburg also briefly made a high quality china doll during this time.
•During the mid 1900s there was a vogue for reproducing the old china head dolls. A few were high quality manufactured products, such as those made by Emma Clear's Humpty Dumpty Doll Hospital.. Emma Clear dolls are desirable collectible dolls today. Ruth Gibbs also produced a nice simple china doll in the 1940s and 1950s. Mark Farmer marketed a wide variety of cheaply made china dolls in the 1950s, both assembled and as parts. The Mark Farmer dolls are frequently sold as antique on eBay, but have low value. Japan produced china dolls. The earliest Japanese china dolls are blond or black haired with pierced ears from the 1940s. The Japanese also made doll kits for home handicrafters in the 1970s. These are also sometimes offered for sale on eBay misidentified as antiques, though of low value. They were originally labeled by a sticker inside the head, but this is often lost. They are also marked with an embossed number 5 on the back of the shoulder plate. •There was a big home handicrafter fad for making ceramic pottery "china" dolls in the 1950s-1970s. The quality of these dolls ranged as widely as the talents of the home crafter, but is usually poor. Often these dolls exhibit a fine crazing to the surface glaze. Sometimes the facial features are wildly painted. These often show up on eBay misidentified as antiques. They have little value.
Tips for Collectors: •Marks: Most china dolls are unmarked, and some companies with known marks were inconsistent in marking their products. Often the only marks found will be simple incised numbers or painter's tic marks inside the shoulder plate. Late period Hertwig dolls may be impressed with GERMANY or Made in GERMANY on the back of the shoulder plate. Alt, Beck and Gottschalk china dolls may be marked with a model number on the back of the shoulder plate. Kling's emblem is an impressed bell and may also have a model number. KPM, Meissen and Royal Copenhagen products are always marked. The KPM mark varied over the years but usually has a sceptor included in some form. The Meissen mark is crossed swords. The Royal Copenhagen mark is 3 parallel wavy lines. Emma Clear dolls are often marked Clear plus a 2 digit number for the year made, or the letter "C" for Clear plus the 2 digit year number. •Values: In general the value of a china doll depends on the shoulder head. A damaged shoulder head can be worth 75% less than a similar undamaged one. A china doll that is still on its original body and dressed in its original clothing may be worth 25% more than a similar "assembled" doll, but it can be difficult to tell if the assembled parts are all antique. The most commonly found china dolls in today's market are the low brow style, with hair molded low over the forehead such as the Hertwig example above. The low brow type of china doll was mass produced from the 1890s through 1930s/40s. It is still possible to buy these heads alone for just a few dollars, and complete dolls of modest size for under $100. Larger low brows with complete original bodies, antique bodies and clothing, and an added feature or 2 can still be found in the $300 or less range. Blonds are slightly less common, as are those with added special features such as jeweled necklaces. These late period chinas are a good way for a new collector to begin. Some collectors like to specialize by collecting examples of all the names in the Pet Name series by Hertwig, or trying to find heads of the same model in a range of sizes. In contrast, the china dolls of the earliest period are difficult to find. Examples by KPM, Royal Copenhagen, and Meissen have sold recently for well over $10,000 at doll specialty auctions. China dolls from the peak middle period, with special features such as glass eyes and elaborate hairdos, can also fetch several thousand dollars. It is wise to start small and educate your eye before making such an investment.
•Things to be wary of: 1.Crazing in the glaze. *This usually indicates a vintage ceramic non porcelain reproduction of poor quality. 2.Shoulder plate damage that is hidden by tightly sewn on clothing or cloth cover. *This was frequently done to cover a damaged shoulder plate. Ask to see that area revealed. 3.Restored or repaired damage. *Old repair materials tend to yellow with age. Be wary of yellowed areas on the shoulder plates that might mean a rebuilt shoulder plate. Ask if the area has been checked with a black light. 4.Flaking paint, as opposed to age related wear to high points. *May indicate repainting to hide old repairs or cracks. Fired on glaze colors do not normally flake or peel off, but repainted areas on top of original glaze will. A blacklight can be used to reveal repainting. 5.Fakes being sold as antique. *Poor quality vintage reproductions are relatively easy to spot, however there are some copies coming out of Germany being made from old molds salvaged from abandoned factory sites. These are trickier to differentiate. Most of the German fakes are being made in bisque or parian, but a few chinas have been cropping up as well. Be cautious about perfect shoulder heads being sold as dug or factory salvage. 6.Hairlines, chips, cracks, and rubs. *China dolls carry most of their value in having intact and completely undamaged heads, including shoulder plates. Any damage can take away as much as 75% of their value. Even a faint hairline can cut value in half. Such damage is more acceptable if the head is especially rare. Some rub wear to the high points on the hair is acceptable, but rubs that effect the face are more bothersome. Watch out for severe nose rubs as they detract from value. 7.Dolls labeled "All original". *Few items survive over 100 years in the same state that they left the factory. Dolls were toys that children dressed and redressed. It is seldom possible to know for sure that a doll of this period is "all original". It is enough that clothing be antique and of the same time period that the doll dates from. Most china dolls were dressed in relatively simple styles, so highly decorative, ruffled and lacy outfits are suspect. 8.Replaced bodies. *Bodies wore out and were replaced, sometimes with a brand new body and sometimes with another antique body. If the body is antique also, look at the way the doll is attached to the body. If the head is sewn on, do the threads appear as aged as the body? Are there signs that another head of slightly different size might have been on that body before? While an "all original" doll with original body and clothing is a plus and is more highly valued, I consider an antique head on an appropriate non-original body to be quite acceptable, especially for a rare early china. Keep in mind that most of the value of these dolls is in the shoulder head. •Note: The term pink luster is frequently and incorrectly used to describe some early china head dolls which have a pinker toned complexion. Pink luster is an iridescent metallic surface, created by using gold in the glaze on the porcelain. There are no metallic glazed china head dolls. The correct term for those with a pinker skin color is simply pink tint. •What kind of defects can you live with? Antique china dolls are not going to be found mint in a box straight from the factory. Avoid damaged shoulder heads unless it is a rare model. Damaged heads have severely lowered value and are hard to resell later. However they are useful as study examples and to practice restoration techniques on. Damaged limbs are not as important. Replacement parts, both new and antique, can be found. Recommended Books: 1."Chinas, Dolls for Study and Admiration" by Mona Borger : Published in 1983, this book is nicely arranged, with beautifully photographed examples without leaping to unfounded conclusions. 2."The Collector's Encyclopedia of Dolls" (volumes 1 and 2) by Dorothy, Elizabeth and Evelyn Coleman : Volume one published in 1968, volume two published in 1986. This pair of books should be a staple on the book shelves of any collector of antique dolls. The 2 volumes offer an overview of information on a vast range of different types of dolls based on well founded research. Many photographs of ALL kinds of dolls." 3."Blue Book Dolls & Values" by Jan Foulke, volumes 1-16 : These books were published over a series of years ending in 2003. They offer examples and values of many different types of collectible dolls. In 2006 Jan Foulke published "Jan Foulke's Guide to Dolls", another excellent general value guide for all kids of dolls.4.Identifying German Chinas 1840s-1930s" by Mary Krombholz : Published in 2004, this book makes an attempt to identify the manufacturers of German china dolls based on similarities in facial paint alone. No comparison of modeling or markings to ID. A nice attempt with good photos, but too many generalizations has lead to some erroneous identifications and too few manufacturers mentioned. Still this book is the most recent and best attempt to date. No info on china dolls from countries other than Germany. 5."China, Parian & Bisque German Dolls" by Lydia Richter : Published in 1993, Many good photographs, including marks. Interesting to compare the same models of dolls that were sometimes made in both china and parian. Errors in identifications abound. This book is limited to only German dolls, though the vast majority of chinas were German made, it excludes French, Swedish, Polish, Czech and any other countries of origin."6.Beloved China Dolls" by Mildred Seeley : Many photographs of beautiful and rare china dolls, however very inaccurate when it comes to identifying the manufacturers. 7."Conta & Boehme Porcelain" by Janice and Richard Vogel : This book is not specifically about dolls, but does offer help in identifying some dolls made by this factory by showing shards of doll heads dug from the factory grounds. If you have further questions about china dolls or dolls in general, you will find many knowledgeable people to ask on the eBay Doll Discussion Board . Just remember that no live auctions can be discussed and advertising is not allowed. If you are interested in learning about china doll reproductions and/or parian dolls please read my guides on those subjects. Thanks and happy hunting! I would like to give credit to the doll book authors who have helped discover some of the history behind these antique dolls; Elizabeth Ann Coleman, Mona Borger, Mary Krombholz, and also researchers Christiane Grafnitz and Greg Mountcastle. They have all contributed towards a better factual understanding of china dolls, with more to come.