Children of Japan

Children of Japan
Courtesy, R. John Wright

The Jumeau 201

The Jumeau 201
Courtesy Theriault's and Antique Doll Collector Magazine

Hinges and Hearts

Hinges and Hearts
An Exhibit of our Metal Dolls

Google+ Followers

Tuxedo and Bangles

Tuxedo and Bangles

A History of Metal Dolls

A History of Metal Dolls
Now on Alibris.com and In Print! The First Book of its Kind

Alice, Commemorative Edition

Alice, Commemorative Edition
Courtesy, R. John Wright

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Emma, aka, La Contessa Bathory

Emma, aka, La Contessa Bathory
Her Grace wishes us all a Merry Christmas!

Annabelle

Annabelle

Emma Emmeline

Emma Emmeline
Our New Addition/fond of stuffed toys

Cloth Clown

Cloth Clown

Native American Art

Native American Art

the triplets

the triplets

c. 1969 Greek Plastic Mini Baby

c. 1969 Greek Plastic Mini Baby
Bought Athens on the street

Iron Maiden; Middle Ages

Iron Maiden; Middle Ages

Sand Baby Swirls!

Sand Baby Swirls!
By Glenda Rolle, courtesy, the Artist

Glenda's Logo

Glenda's Logo
Also, a link to her site

Sand Baby Castaway

Sand Baby Castaway
By Glenda Rolle, Courtesy the Artist

A French Friend

A French Friend

Mickey

Mickey
From our friends at The Fennimore Museum

2000+ year old Roman Rag Doll

2000+ year old Roman Rag Doll
British Museum, Child's Tomb

Ancient Egypt Paddle Doll

Ancient Egypt Paddle Doll
Among first "Toys?"

ushabti

ushabti
Egyptian Tomb Doll 18th Dynasty

Ann Parker Doll of Anne Boleyn

Ann Parker Doll of Anne Boleyn

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Tin Head Brother and Sister, a Recent Purchase

Tin Head Brother and Sister, a Recent Purchase
Courtesy, Antique Daughter

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Judge Peep

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Hakata Doll Artist at Work
From the Museum Collection

Follow by Email

Japanese Costume Barbies

Japanese Costume Barbies
Samurai Ken

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Dr. E's on Display with sign

Dr. E's on Display with sign

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Dolls Restored ad New to the Museum
L to R: K*R /celluloid head, all bisque Artist Googly, 14 in. vinyl inuit sixties, early celluloid Skookum type.

Two More Rescued Dolls

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Late Sixties Vinyl: L to R: Probably Horseman, all vinyl, jointed. New wig. R: Effanbee, probably Muffy, mid sixties. New wig and new clothing on both. About 12 inches high.

Restored Italian Baby Doll

Restored Italian Baby Doll
One of Dr. E's Rescued Residents

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Dolls on Display
L to R: Nutcrackers, Danish Troll, HItty and her book, Patent Washable, Mechanical Minstrel, Creche figure, M. Alexander Swiss. Center is a German mechanical bear on the piano. Background is a bisque German costume doll.

A Few Friends

A Few Friends
These dolls are Old German and Nutcrackers from Dr. E's Museum. They are on loan to another local museum for the holidays.

Vintage Collage

Vintage Collage
Public Domain Art

The Merry Wanderer

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Courtesy R. John Wright, The Hummel Collection

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Wednesday, October 24, 2012

From The Doll Book/Laura Starr-Dolls and Education

These are telling and important quotes the UFDC should adopt at p. 233 from Chapter 25, The Educational Value of the Doll: "What topic yet proposed for the education fo the young is not in part at least illustrated by doll study? A knowledge of history, geography, folklore, tadition of peoples, their poetry, music, sentiments, dances, social religious festivals are essential to the education of broad mindd individuals'. How better can these things be taught to children than to make object lessons of the mannikins that represent types and clsses of various ountries? Dolls have a social and religious significance; fundamentl principles, which undrlie folklroe and traditions, are embodied and set forth by dolls, which the majority of people look upon simply as children's toys." Starr refers to a pamphlet by G. Stanely Hall and A. Cassowell Ellis of Clark Unviersity, MA, published int he early 1900s asking certan data of response of childrent o objects representing a baby or child. Questions were: 1. With ragard to kind of doll, of what material it was made, etc. 2. The feeding of dolls, what kind of food and how given. 3. Medicine an disease were treated, what remedies were given adn how. 4. What constituted the death of a doll, funeral services and burial. 5. Details of psychic acts and qualities ascribed to dolls. 6. Information wanted re doll names, accesories, toilet articles, furnishings. 7. What did children think of doll families, doll discipline, hygiene, and regimen, rewards and pubnishments; how dolls are put to sleep. 8. What is the influence of dolls on children? etc. 9. Is there regularity and persistency in the care of dolls? etc. See p. 230-231 in Starr. The book is available on eBay and Amazon, and on Kindle.

Memoir; Writing your Life Story: The Yellow Brick Road; Memoirs of Autumn

Memoir; Writing your Life Story: The Yellow Brick Road; Memoirs of Autumn: My friend's sloping driveway was covered in several inches of glowing gold leaves today. It looked like The Yellow Brick Road. It is 80 y...

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Tonner now Takes PayPal

I love Tonner, but I only have one. They are very well made dolls, if a little pricey , but still well worth collecting. Here is the latest newsletter, with information re their new PayPal acceptance. Enjoy!
Tonner Doll Paypal Now Accepting PayPal From: Tonner Doll Company To: etsag1998 Date: Tue, Oct 23, 2012 1:36 pm Having trouble viewing this email? Click here http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?llr=b8clxgcab&v=001Qll-Xe3DdxHqK5lM72iXg4SNDaWckDKhYw4orH0kPghYpjBk-t6TyhszBGaW9pNXRn_qtEVAI059ZL6iFz5j8EELhHeY2Lm8EyskodELoTZnZXHmmy6QziaWZoYoI9AQ-pRZX_tD8lTZkZSBTq5AD9wxV34Fb8iQ_FLAl-gaJwiXHHYErmaCiAGLFDvOBVTiWfBYq8-QwTgX5l79SaH85tn1bvRfG5fVlnNG4UPKUZ9_ITJsYIGCQYmhTgAhhggfRSPV1HXjJ7c%3D Tonner Logo w/ reg symbol [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?e=001TwoBGes4DlPOqb14kh91QduF7XdH_hG5GjJQClS5B8YoAI3Zq0PNFOLQKP-BxkrOFukV-eefcp_eQSyMdQWcs6nZG_qnjmRtBMlzkBOPhLehPpUkRLjECw==] ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Hi Collectors! Just a friendly note to let you know that we are pleased to again be offering PayPal as a form of payment! Simply select PayPal as the payment method at checkout, and follow the instructions from there. Happy Shopping, Team Tonner ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Find us on Facebook [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?e=001TwoBGes4DlN5CjeeFMEmlBRd7SKxGpjVUMPzd4yyBYw2JUMbeeOOH0zXIhxoOI_8Qb6o6NOyl_Tmh4wt8G-U_3otydCfr0S6eS3loQKOB2_bIt8GdNu6SM5R8meXRQEq] Follow us on Twitter [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?e=001TwoBGes4DlP-7tDY_AzLRHqj_xwVLNyNIECMfn_RrFaqTJ_Htengc8yJTHjDXTRR166YleKuu8FjqmqCcwTXPF9o5RbJGMSL_DlobpdmJmKQoexWi9ZY7sF0F0dzLW4X4HX6y_boqVo=] View our videos on YouTube [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?e=001TwoBGes4DlNyLK4iGVe2EUqlEXa8LUgbcTZXghrcT1AmOQAfunEZkRcdyg4AaQ1-mZDePuoMnYxprzgjO7lxkPqsp6-vHnAg-tjU3L8IRuCj_MC2PeHYMZHSTMql98aRnssLwrG84CofTONJGRKJe73QtmwRW1b8mcF9RL_1tG8=] Visit our blog [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?e=001TwoBGes4DlMOLphxOaVjTyTuejg-7nCl85ayKij0xuDKFBt3TwEeqGq2Sg5rzX8Nc4VqVliwXF0IQXE49Yx4gM3SHnMb5Z3vUm9TAoxNabt4DvdDHIarrgpYf1ufTqQT] Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, You Tube, and our Tonner Blog! ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Forward email http://ui.constantcontact.com/sa/fwtf.jsp?llr=b8clxgcab&m=1101884918625&ea=etsag1998@aol.com&a=1111349357002 This email was sent to etsag1998@aol.com by tonnerdirect@tonnerdoll.com. Update Profile/Email Address http://visitor.constantcontact.com/do?p=oo&mse=001P3AZIpApn2BdrvJb1dNyIhic73CtXuXAOKRYvxfL3FU%3D&t=001zwpjL1DEjf-SsujF0N7vIQ%3D%3D&reason=001IqezpQbqEsU%3D&llr=b8clxgcab Instant removal with SafeUnsubscribe(TM) http://visitor.constantcontact.com/do?p=un&mse=001P3AZIpApn2BdrvJb1dNyIhic73CtXuXAOKRYvxfL3FU%3D&t=001zwpjL1DEjf-SsujF0N7vIQ%3D%3D&reason=001IqezpQbqEsU%3D&llr=b8clxgcab Privacy Policy: http://ui.constantcontact.com/roving/CCPrivacyPolicy.jsp Online Marketing by Constant Contact(R) www.constantcontact.com Tonner Direct | 301 Wall Street | Kingston | NY | 12401

Monday, October 22, 2012

Doll Museum: more on the 18th c.

Doll Museum: more on the 18th c.: I have been studying a lot on 18th c. dolls lately; here is a useful bibliography on the Queen Anne Period: BIBLIOGRAPHY OF QUEEN ANNE...

Wednesday, October 17, 2012

English Half Doll Collection on YouTube

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1HyxcZwWnfw

Above Link is a very good story about a collection of half dolls, including an unusual Wimbledon tennis player from YouTube.

I hope you like it.

Monday, October 15, 2012

Doll Trends and Market Musings

I just read tips of ineffective bloggers in a ProBlogger newsletter. This is a wonderful source for those who blog, but I confess I have sinned. First booboo is typos; again, I apologize for mine, but I have no spell check and have arthritic hands and fingers, albeit at a young age. Having said that, I thank profusely the 40,000 some people who view/read this and my seven other blogs. I thought I would comment on trends in collecting. I now the good advice is to buy "only the best," and to invest in "high end dolls," whatever that may mean. Certainly, if one can by an A.T. all original, do it. If you can find The Sunshine Family or a set of Mme. A Little Women MIB, do it! But, locally, in our MW region, and from what I see on eBay and Etsy, I note that all dolls seem to do well. The dolls at Tuesday Morning, collectors barbies, current Alexanders, Goetz, fly off the shelves. My mom and I have shopped there for years, and are on a first name basis with the staff. They tell us that when the newsletter goes out, and the Alexanders come in, people stand in line, and the dealers/collectors/doll speculators are first in line and leave with their arms full. At a recent estate sale, I stood in line to get in, twice, and the dolls were all scooped up. The same thing happens when my friend DT does sales. These dolls are mostly German, many A and M, and several in are in doll parts. Doll clothes sell immediately. China doll heads and bisqe heads sell in any condition. Annalee dolls are crossover collectibles, and don't last past the first hour of any sale. At thrift shops, CPK dolls in any condition do very well. One of my best friends collects them avidly, but she is not the only one scooping them up. Barbies are fewer and fewer at our Goodwill and Salvation Army. We have some OOAK artists operating in my area [more about that in another blog] and several seamtresses who make custom clothes for Barbie, her friends and clones. The SA is carrying more dolls, especially vintage 60s and 70s. Artists reproductions of antique dolls don't last long, either. These usually have very nice dresses. One friend of mine who is now a dealer sets up twice a year in a local park. She has mainly foreign dolls, some vintage HP, many sixties to eighties dolls, some compo. She has a fiew of the Franklin and Heritage Mint editions, too. If I don't get there early, I have to stand in line and the dolls are gone. Nancy Ann storybook and the upbiquitous "Suzie Sweeheart" or "Dress me" dolls have actually gone up in price. These have nostalgic value; they are the first dolls many girls collected in late 40s to sixties, and they were brought to an art by Carlson Dolls, Gambina, and other companies. They also were instrumental in teaching little girls to sew. I loved ordering them from Patio Tacos, and getting them at Gas Stations as premiums when I was little, and who didn't live the Doll in the Dome, encased in a plastic bell. I see a lot of people selling dolls of all types now again at yard sales; these sell as do many types of stuffed animals. I recently bought a Steiff panda, jointed, newer, with all tags and buttons for 5.00. I bought the Steiff yellow lab for about $1. I see bisque figurines selling more than I used to, especially Lefton. Several new antique shops have sprung up, and can't keep dolls in stock. The dolls range from composition, to Skookums, folk cloth [I lost out on a great one last week!], artists cloth, Effanbee repro Patsy's of the 90s; newer Ginnys, and Alexanders. There are also some Annette Himstedt, and I found wonderful Sashas at a craft mall last year. We have people making art dolls of all types from vintage parts, and many reproduction heads and parts are used. These genre has given doll collectors whole new categories. These items are hot, and don't stay on the shelves long. Almost everyone I talk to has some dolls at home, or likes to make them. They don't consider themselves collectors, but the trends are very interesting. Reasonably priced dolls are doing well, and even broken vintage and antique dolls are in demand. I've even seen men vying for them. Doll clothes and accessories, character dolls, Barbies and action figures have a devoted following, too. It just proves again that "All dolls are collectible!" I've always thought with any collection, the whole is greater than the sum of its parts, even though we all have our collectible stars. Happy Dolling, and you don't have to break the bank to enjoy the hobby!

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: The Pewter Headed Huret

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: The Peter Headed Huret: Good Morning! I am looking for any information and photos about the whereaouts of this doll. It was once in the Maureen Popp collection, a...

The Pewter Headed Huret

Good Morning! I am looking for any information and photos about the whereabouts of this doll. It was once in the Maureen Popp collection, and as far as I know, Dorothy Dixon was her last owner. I would like a photo of the doll for my book on metal dolls, currently listed on Google books, and about to go into print. I am interested in buying the doll if it is for sale, or in any other dolls like it. There was a story about Huret dolls done in 3 parts in Doll News in the late 80s. I think the dolls wears a blue gingham type dress, and has a white linen or cotton hood on her hair. She is wigged and has painted features, and looks like the bisque Hurets in many respects. Any information is greatly appreciated. Also, I would like photos of dolls by Lucien Vervelle, who had a metal head doll patent in France in the 1870s, or of any pewter heads like those in the late Gladys Hils Hilsdorf collection. I also welcome photos or information of other metal dolls, metal heads, mechanical dolls, toy soldiers, mechanical/talking/mamma dolls, animatrons, dolls with metal parts, automatons, or marionettes. Also weclome information or photos about the Edison phonograph doll. I am intersted in buying one, even if it is in parts. Thanks to all who read my blogs! Happy Autumn!

Monday, October 8, 2012

Great Site-Antique Doll Collectors Online

See below; This is a great site to post dolls to be identified, and to comment on dolls. There is also doll sale information. There are also photos and other tidbits that are useful and fun. And, it is free and friendly! There's new information at antiquedolls-collectors-onlineadvisors.com, submitted by folks with the same interest in this topic as the two of us. You can read it here... http://www.antiquedolls-collectors-onlineadvisors.com/kestner-7-166.html Feel free to comment on any new contribution. Please tell your friends so they can give feedback, too. And, of course, you can contribute again to antiquedolls-collectors-onlineadvisors.com whenever you like. Your submissions mean a lot to me, and to other visitors to the site. http://www.antiquedolls-collectors-onlineadvisors.com/with-love-from-tin-lizzie-a-history-of-metal-heads-dolls-with-metal-parts-and-automata.html Best regards, Merle antiquedolls-collectors-onlineadvisors.com P.S. You requested this notification when you submitted your contribution. To stop receiving notices, click on the unsubscribe link below... http://www.antiquedolls-collectors-onlineadvisors.com/dyn/C2/Unsubscribe?domain=antiquedolls-collectors-onlineadvisors.com&author_id=21234795

Friday, October 5, 2012

China Heads

Here is the eBay guide article to china heads. I might add that old china has a gray cast to it; when you handle enough dolls that gray, luminescent cast is unmistakeable. There are also tiny imperfections that vary; they look like little beauty marks, and are actually kiln dirt. These appear in antiques; I've never seen them in reproduction The best reproduction I have is now 45 years old and came from The Tinkerbell Toy Shoppe in Disneyland. She is really something, even when placed next to a good antique. Read below and enjoy. Mona Borger's books are also good on the topic.
Antique China Dolls - dating and detecting repros : eBay Guides Reviews & GuidesGuidesReviews Reviews & Guides Home page Write a guide Guides by: dturnersan( 5983) 321 out of 346 people found this guide helpful. Guide viewed: 79659 times Tags: china doll | antique doll | antique | history | porcelain
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The goal of this guide is to help antique doll collectors and sellers judge the age, possible country of origin and authenticity of china dolls. eBay is a fine venue for collecting and selling antique china dolls , however many offered for sale are misidentified. It is common to find vintage reproductions being described as antique, and antique dolls dated much earlier than their real age.
The early years, rare beauties: •The earliest and rarest of the antique china dolls date from the 1840s and were made by pioneer porcelain makers such as German companies KPM Berlin (Konigliche Porzellan Manufaktur c.1763 -present) and Meissen (1710 - present), and Royal Copenhagen of Denmark (1775 - present). These china dolls are of the highest quality. China dolls from this early period seldom show up on eBay. They are highly desirable and command the highest prices. KPM Berlin, Meissen and Royal Copenhagen products were always marked inside the shoulder plate with the company signature. If unmarked then they are not made by these companies. KPM Berlin dolls are distinguished by a red line on the edge of the eyelid, but no line in the eyelid crease. It should be noted that Royal Copenhagen reissued 3 models of china shoulder heads starting in 1978 that were based upon their original 1840s models. The male version of these reissues is only marked inside the back of the shoulder plate. The 2 lady reissues have the word Denmark and 3 wavy blue lines on the outside and the model numbers inside. There were 3 models reissued, a 5 1/2" shoulder head of a lady with bun, a smaller lady with bun, and a boy the same size as the latter. It was a small production run that was only made for a couple of years. These more modern versions are hard to find and are desirable, however they are not as valuable as the original antique ones and should not be confused with them. The Royal Copenhagen example below, on the bottom left, is one of the reissue heads.
Other early companies followed. Most in Germany (A.W.Fr.Kister, Limbach, Kestner, etc.), Poland (TPM, Carl Tielsch), Czechoslovakia (Schlaggenwald), France (Jacob Petit and others), and Sweden ( Rorstrand ). There is debate about whether England produced certain china dolls as well. Note that there were literally hundreds of small porcelain manufacturing companies springing up by now, and many of them made china dolls, so this list of manufacturers is just the tip of the iceburg.
•The china dolls from the 1840s - 1850s can be found with a variety of hairstyles, such as the Lydia style with long ringlets almost to the shoulder, the Greiner style with shorter hair and exposed ears similar to the papier mache Greiner dolls, and the lady dolls with swoops of hair on either side pulled back into a bun.
The middle years, peak popularity:
•In the 1850s and 1860s the popularity of the china head dolls grew. More styles by more companies were available, though the most common was the covered wagon hairdo. Most came from German companies such as A.W.Fr.Kister, Kestner, Kloster Veilsdorf, Limbach, and Conta & Boehme, among others. Hair styles became more varied and elaborate, some were made as portraits of famous ladies such as Jenny Lind. Special features such as glass eyes, and the so-called Motschmann type bodies were sometimes made. The French companies Rohmer, Barrois and Huret marketed some fashion dolls in china, though most were in bisque. Again, this is not a complete list of all the companies producing china dolls.
•From the 1860s and 1870s, to the end of the 19th century, the companies Alt, Beck & Gottschalck, C.F.Kling and Hertwig joined the ranks of china doll producers. Alt, Beck & Gottschalck was probably the most prolific manufacturer. Some blond chinas and male dolls were also produced during this time. A few black chinas were also made. The faces became more childlike with rounded cheeks. The most common hairstyles were the high brow type and flat top style. 1860s -1870s china head dolls The late years, decline: •By the end of the century the popularity of china dolls was losing out to the bisque dolls. Most china dolls of this period were modeled as children. C.F.Kling continued to make chinas during the end of the 1800s. Hertwig continued into the first quarter of the 1900s, but the quality of china dolls declined in the early 1900s. The most common hairstyle was the lowbrow type. Hertwig introduced Pet name chinas in 1895, usually placed on cloth ABC or flag bodies. Dolls of this era are the type of china most often seen on eBay. Also the trading company Bawo & Dotter contracted with both Hertwig and Kling to make dolls for them. The low brow chinas continued to be sold as late as the 1930s-1940s.
•In 1890 the McKinley Tariff Act was passed, requiring imported goods to be permanently marked with the country of origin, The Act went into effect in 1891. Therefore, if a doll head is impressed with the word "Germany" it dates no earlier than 1891. In 1921 the Act was amended to require the addition of the words "made in". Any dolls impressed "Made in Germany" date after 1921. The Act was also amended in 1917 to allow imports to be marked with a rubber stamp or pasted label. Those labelings often didn't withstand the passage of time and are now unmarked. Most of those items were made in Japan, though they previously used the Nippon mark. Goods that were made for domestic use in Europe or Asia wouldn't have had to comply with that law. •There were a few high quality china head dolls produced during the first quarter of the 1900s. Dressel & Kister made fine figurines, half dolls and some shoulder head dolls. Nymphenburg also briefly made a high quality china doll during this time.
•During the mid 1900s there was a vogue for reproducing the old china head dolls. A few were high quality manufactured products, such as those made by Emma Clear's Humpty Dumpty Doll Hospital.. Emma Clear dolls are desirable collectible dolls today. Ruth Gibbs also produced a nice simple china doll in the 1940s and 1950s. Mark Farmer marketed a wide variety of cheaply made china dolls in the 1950s, both assembled and as parts. The Mark Farmer dolls are frequently sold as antique on eBay, but have low value. Japan produced china dolls. The earliest Japanese china dolls are blond or black haired with pierced ears from the 1940s. The Japanese also made doll kits for home handicrafters in the 1970s. These are also sometimes offered for sale on eBay misidentified as antiques, though of low value. They were originally labeled by a sticker inside the head, but this is often lost. They are also marked with an embossed number 5 on the back of the shoulder plate. •There was a big home handicrafter fad for making ceramic pottery "china" dolls in the 1950s-1970s. The quality of these dolls ranged as widely as the talents of the home crafter, but is usually poor. Often these dolls exhibit a fine crazing to the surface glaze. Sometimes the facial features are wildly painted. These often show up on eBay misidentified as antiques. They have little value.
Tips for Collectors: •Marks: Most china dolls are unmarked, and some companies with known marks were inconsistent in marking their products. Often the only marks found will be simple incised numbers or painter's tic marks inside the shoulder plate. Late period Hertwig dolls may be impressed with GERMANY or Made in GERMANY on the back of the shoulder plate. Alt, Beck and Gottschalk china dolls may be marked with a model number on the back of the shoulder plate. Kling's emblem is an impressed bell and may also have a model number. KPM, Meissen and Royal Copenhagen products are always marked. The KPM mark varied over the years but usually has a sceptor included in some form. The Meissen mark is crossed swords. The Royal Copenhagen mark is 3 parallel wavy lines. Emma Clear dolls are often marked Clear plus a 2 digit number for the year made, or the letter "C" for Clear plus the 2 digit year number. •Values: In general the value of a china doll depends on the shoulder head. A damaged shoulder head can be worth 75% less than a similar undamaged one. A china doll that is still on its original body and dressed in its original clothing may be worth 25% more than a similar "assembled" doll, but it can be difficult to tell if the assembled parts are all antique. The most commonly found china dolls in today's market are the low brow style, with hair molded low over the forehead such as the Hertwig example above. The low brow type of china doll was mass produced from the 1890s through 1930s/40s. It is still possible to buy these heads alone for just a few dollars, and complete dolls of modest size for under $100. Larger low brows with complete original bodies, antique bodies and clothing, and an added feature or 2 can still be found in the $300 or less range. Blonds are slightly less common, as are those with added special features such as jeweled necklaces. These late period chinas are a good way for a new collector to begin. Some collectors like to specialize by collecting examples of all the names in the Pet Name series by Hertwig, or trying to find heads of the same model in a range of sizes. In contrast, the china dolls of the earliest period are difficult to find. Examples by KPM, Royal Copenhagen, and Meissen have sold recently for well over $10,000 at doll specialty auctions. China dolls from the peak middle period, with special features such as glass eyes and elaborate hairdos, can also fetch several thousand dollars. It is wise to start small and educate your eye before making such an investment.
•Things to be wary of: 1.Crazing in the glaze. *This usually indicates a vintage ceramic non porcelain reproduction of poor quality. 2.Shoulder plate damage that is hidden by tightly sewn on clothing or cloth cover. *This was frequently done to cover a damaged shoulder plate. Ask to see that area revealed. 3.Restored or repaired damage. *Old repair materials tend to yellow with age. Be wary of yellowed areas on the shoulder plates that might mean a rebuilt shoulder plate. Ask if the area has been checked with a black light. 4.Flaking paint, as opposed to age related wear to high points. *May indicate repainting to hide old repairs or cracks. Fired on glaze colors do not normally flake or peel off, but repainted areas on top of original glaze will. A blacklight can be used to reveal repainting. 5.Fakes being sold as antique. *Poor quality vintage reproductions are relatively easy to spot, however there are some copies coming out of Germany being made from old molds salvaged from abandoned factory sites. These are trickier to differentiate. Most of the German fakes are being made in bisque or parian, but a few chinas have been cropping up as well. Be cautious about perfect shoulder heads being sold as dug or factory salvage. 6.Hairlines, chips, cracks, and rubs. *China dolls carry most of their value in having intact and completely undamaged heads, including shoulder plates. Any damage can take away as much as 75% of their value. Even a faint hairline can cut value in half. Such damage is more acceptable if the head is especially rare. Some rub wear to the high points on the hair is acceptable, but rubs that effect the face are more bothersome. Watch out for severe nose rubs as they detract from value. 7.Dolls labeled "All original". *Few items survive over 100 years in the same state that they left the factory. Dolls were toys that children dressed and redressed. It is seldom possible to know for sure that a doll of this period is "all original". It is enough that clothing be antique and of the same time period that the doll dates from. Most china dolls were dressed in relatively simple styles, so highly decorative, ruffled and lacy outfits are suspect. 8.Replaced bodies. *Bodies wore out and were replaced, sometimes with a brand new body and sometimes with another antique body. If the body is antique also, look at the way the doll is attached to the body. If the head is sewn on, do the threads appear as aged as the body? Are there signs that another head of slightly different size might have been on that body before? While an "all original" doll with original body and clothing is a plus and is more highly valued, I consider an antique head on an appropriate non-original body to be quite acceptable, especially for a rare early china. Keep in mind that most of the value of these dolls is in the shoulder head. •Note: The term pink luster is frequently and incorrectly used to describe some early china head dolls which have a pinker toned complexion. Pink luster is an iridescent metallic surface, created by using gold in the glaze on the porcelain. There are no metallic glazed china head dolls. The correct term for those with a pinker skin color is simply pink tint. •What kind of defects can you live with? Antique china dolls are not going to be found mint in a box straight from the factory. Avoid damaged shoulder heads unless it is a rare model. Damaged heads have severely lowered value and are hard to resell later. However they are useful as study examples and to practice restoration techniques on. Damaged limbs are not as important. Replacement parts, both new and antique, can be found. Recommended Books: 1."Chinas, Dolls for Study and Admiration" by Mona Borger : Published in 1983, this book is nicely arranged, with beautifully photographed examples without leaping to unfounded conclusions. 2."The Collector's Encyclopedia of Dolls" (volumes 1 and 2) by Dorothy, Elizabeth and Evelyn Coleman : Volume one published in 1968, volume two published in 1986. This pair of books should be a staple on the book shelves of any collector of antique dolls. The 2 volumes offer an overview of information on a vast range of different types of dolls based on well founded research. Many photographs of ALL kinds of dolls." 3."Blue Book Dolls & Values" by Jan Foulke, volumes 1-16 : These books were published over a series of years ending in 2003. They offer examples and values of many different types of collectible dolls. In 2006 Jan Foulke published "Jan Foulke's Guide to Dolls", another excellent general value guide for all kids of dolls.4.Identifying German Chinas 1840s-1930s" by Mary Krombholz : Published in 2004, this book makes an attempt to identify the manufacturers of German china dolls based on similarities in facial paint alone. No comparison of modeling or markings to ID. A nice attempt with good photos, but too many generalizations has lead to some erroneous identifications and too few manufacturers mentioned. Still this book is the most recent and best attempt to date. No info on china dolls from countries other than Germany. 5."China, Parian & Bisque German Dolls" by Lydia Richter : Published in 1993, Many good photographs, including marks. Interesting to compare the same models of dolls that were sometimes made in both china and parian. Errors in identifications abound. This book is limited to only German dolls, though the vast majority of chinas were German made, it excludes French, Swedish, Polish, Czech and any other countries of origin."6.Beloved China Dolls" by Mildred Seeley : Many photographs of beautiful and rare china dolls, however very inaccurate when it comes to identifying the manufacturers. 7."Conta & Boehme Porcelain" by Janice and Richard Vogel : This book is not specifically about dolls, but does offer help in identifying some dolls made by this factory by showing shards of doll heads dug from the factory grounds. If you have further questions about china dolls or dolls in general, you will find many knowledgeable people to ask on the eBay Doll Discussion Board . Just remember that no live auctions can be discussed and advertising is not allowed. If you are interested in learning about china doll reproductions and/or parian dolls please read my guides on those subjects. Thanks and happy hunting! I would like to give credit to the doll book authors who have helped discover some of the history behind these antique dolls; Elizabeth Ann Coleman, Mona Borger, Mary Krombholz, and also researchers Christiane Grafnitz and Greg Mountcastle. They have all contributed towards a better factual understanding of china dolls, with more to come.

Dolls at Garage Sales

Ah, how I love when the season begins, around April through November, with flea markets sprinkled all year. Here is an interesting guide. For more, see the Blog at The National Museum of Play, formerly The Strong Museum:
Dolls found at garage sales might be gold ... or not! In the never-ending quest for items to sell on Ebay you are often going to come across dolls. If you are not a doll collector, this could cause you to stand and scratch your head and wonder “should I or shouldn’t I?” My purpose of this review is to just give basic information that might help you make a decision. I’m not going into manufacturer’s names at all, just materials used to help you determine era and whether you should buy or not. Never spend more than you can afford to lose. The main materials that you are going to find dolls made of are: Antique China (shiny, glazed porcelain). Antique Bisque (dull, matte finish porcelain). Composition (pressed sawdust with painted surface), Hard plastic (doesn’t bend when squeezed). Rigid Vinyl (thick, feels warmish to the touch) Vinyl (softer, more realistic feeling) Stuffed vinyl (usually only jointed at neck) often in fancy gowns. Magic Skin (often found tearing at neck and turning black with age/handling). Cloth China head dolls are glazed porcelain and most often white in color with black or blonde hair. The good ones have a fine red line detailing above their painted eyes and little red dots in the corner of the eyes and nostrils. Most of the value is in the head and the body can be replaced by a buyer if it's not good. Keep it with the doll. It’s part of her provenance (history). Sell it with the doll. Some pretty disreputable bodies are worth money. I recommend that a non-doll collector NOT wash old doll clothing. Note: Antique china head dolls did not craze, if found with fine cracking/crazing they are made of ceramic and probably are a reproduction from as long ago as the 1930’s. Antique Bisque head dolls have a soft unglazed pink coloring to more closely resemble skin tones. They came with a wood ball jointed composition body or a kid leather pin jointed body. Most have eyes that sleep when laid down. It wouldn’t be unusual to find one, loosely strung, in a box with the top of her head off and her eyes rolled back! If the price is right, that’s still a good deal. The top of the head was left open in manufacture to allow access to insert sleep eyes. It was later covered with a wig. She’s loose because her elastic stringing needs replaced which most doll collectors know how to do or know someone who does. Don’t worry about broken fingers on an antique doll body, those can be repaired. Broken eyes can be glued back together in many cases. Many prefer old repaired eyes to new replaced ones. Do look over a head real good, looking for cracks so fine that they look like hair = hairline cracks. Those do matter to the value! Don’t attempt to comb out an old doll wig. If it’s in the original set that can change the value too. Contemporary Collector Dolls: If you find a bisque doll with painted or stationary eyes; her original box; a COA (certificate of authenticity) and a nice white cloth body and her original clothing with miles of ruffles and lace………she’d probably more likely be called a modern decorator item. Sure, some have the COA and it might even say limited production. However, the “limit” was just to the extent of the number they could sell. Anyone who wanted one could buy them from HSN and QVC and they are ALL mint! Unless you want it for yourself, your child or are getting it super cheap, I also pass those up too as doll values are fueled by supply and demand. Composition dolls from the 1920-1950’s are often found with surface crazing. The makeup of composition is primarily sawdust and glue with a painted surface. Fluctuations between summer/hot and winter/cold in attics and basements caused the base materials to expand and contract but the painted surface didn’t have that ability so, instead, it cracked. Fine crazing is acceptable by most collectors, however, peeling open cracks demand professional restoration, which can be costly. Let the buyer do any clean up. They have their own methods they prefer. Magic Skin was made for a period between composition dolls and hard plastic. It was thought it would more closely resemble real skin. It is very soft and pliable with not much detailing showing in fingers or toes. Time has not served Magic Skin well. The majority of such dolls are found with beautiful hard plastic heads with a body that has started to rot away and turn brown or even black from contact with our skin oils. There is really no good way that has been found to save these bodies. Such dolls then become donor dolls for their wigs or original clothing and/or shoes. Hard plastic dolls followed in the 1950’s – 1960. They had glued on wigs. One thing you HAVE to do with a hard plastic doll is to SMELL it! Yep, I put it right up to my nose and give it a good strong sniff right at the neck. Unfortunately, when those early manufacturers of hard plastic dolls were stirring up their mix some weren’t thinking about collectors 50 years later and often used inferior products to cut corners at times. Some of those are breaking down now and smell just like Baby Puke! The doll is only good for parts: wig, clothing, shoes. This stench, of which I warn you, is different from the slightly musty smell of old elastic that can be replaced. Mention any odors in your ad. Vinyl dolls from the 1960’s have a strong following as the baby boomers have establish their careers and are trying to buy back their dolls. They most often are the rigid, sturdy vinyl and have rooted hair. Pull back the hair to make sure that all the holes have hair in them. That affects price. Has the hair been cut? Are all the eyelashes there? That affects value too as does ink. Stuffed Vinyl: There were MANY of high-heeled stuffed vinyl lady dolls made in the late 1940’s into 1950’s. They are still often found in their original boxes complete with long wedding gown or formal. These were sold in grocery stores and through catalogs. They were large and unwieldy and often saved for “good” just to be looked at on Sunday. Value is driven by supply and demand. Don’t be fooled by their size and completeness. There are lots of these still around, mint in box. ID marks: The manufacturers most often marked their company name on the back of the neck or between the shoulderblades. If Made in China shows anywhere……….leave it! It’s most likely too new to make you rich either! Reproductions. Lots of people started doing antique bisque doll reproductions in the 1970’s and it continued to be a popular craft form for the next 20 years. Look for an ethical reproductionist’s to have inscribed their name, initials, and/or date by scratching it into the bisque on the back of the neck. This is usually marked close to the antique bisque mark from the original mold from which it was copied. Barbie with JAPAN anywhere on body….buy, especially if it's cheap. Just look for that JAPAN mark. Those old valuable Barbie dolls marked JAPAN had straight arms, (some had eyelashes) later dolls all had easily recognizable bent arms. Old Barbie outfits had a cloth tag that was embroidered instead of stamped. Don’t wash those clothes. That could be a costly mistake for you. Even if they’ve been plucked bald and the toes are chewed…if it says JAPAN on it somewhere…somebody wants at least part of it!Buy it cheap. Cloth: The most common cloth doll that you might find is a Raggedy Ann/Andy. Look for the mfgr name of Volland on the tag. That will be a good find for you! Shipping: This is also a good place to state that if you do sell an antique bisque doll with sleep eyes, if she has her original human hair or mohair wig still glued in place, you’ll need to gently lift the edge of the wig and using a cotton ball soaked in vinegar water (squeeze out excess) to dissolve the glue, you’ll need to gently pry off the wig so you can stuff some toilet paper or tissue paper down inside the head for shipment so the action of the sleep eyes doesn’t cause the eyes to come loose from the inside of the head during shipment and break and there goes your profit! Leave the wig loose. Do not pack with newspaper next to the doll. The ink will transfer onto the doll or clothing. Put protective layer of white tissue paper in place first. Double box. Do not put bubble wrap directly on the composition as it might stick in hot weather or cause dampness to be trapped in cold weather. Ship compo (and wax) dolls the first of the week in the heat of the summer. If you need help identifying a doll you’ve found, all are welcome to post on the Dolls Chat board or the Dolls Discussion Board before you list. eBay Doll Chat Board eBay Doll Discussion Board Guide ID: 10000000000006715Guide created: 10/01/05 (updated 08/07/12)

Doll Guides Online

I would like to start an informal series on this topic; it is sort of a shortened version of my bibliography, which is hard copy. The first entry below is a partial list of eBay guides on dolls. These are also available for all other categories of collectibles on eBay. I will post from other sources, too, including some newsletters and websites I hear from. I will not duplicate this material on the Doll Museum blog, but will post other guides there where relevant to the era. I have been bloggin on French dolls, there, and have more to write about. Enjoy!
1196 guides found in Dolls & Bears American Girl Dolls Buying Guide by In an attempt to make history more accessible to young women, the American Girl line of dolls was born. During a Christmas shopping trip in 1984, doll maker Pleasant T. Rowland realized that most dolls either... Tags: american girl dolls | doll collector | mattel | doll clothes | doll makers Shop for related items Teddy Bears Buying Guide by There will always be toys that we can count on to be there for every generation, including the Yo-Yo, Slinky, and Mr. Potato Head, but none is more endearing or enduring than the teddy bear. Teddy bears are... Tags: teddy bear | toys | stuffed animals | steiff bears | teddy bear collection Shop for related items Madame Alexander Dolls Buying Guide by Since the early part of the last century, both young and mature doll collectors have delighted in the unique, handcrafted quality of Madame Alexander dolls. Whether you?re nostalgic to relive the memories of... Tags: dolls | madame alexander dolls | collectible madame | doll collectors | cloth dolls Shop for related items Barbie Dolls Buying Guide by Barbie is an American icon and easily the most popular doll in the world. Whether you?re purchasing a gift for that special child or adding to your own Barbie collection, you'll find an unparalleled variety... Tags: vintage barbie | barbie doll house | barbie shoes | dolls | clothing Shop for related items Dolls Buying Guide by For many serious doll collectors, only vintage, antique, or modern collectible dolls will do. While collectible dolls are beautiful and rare, they?re not meant to be playthings. If you?re looking for a new... Tags: dolls | american girl | cabbage patch dolls | barbie dolls | baby dolls Shop for related items Reborn Dolls Buying Guide by Reborn dolls bring new life to ordinary, cloth-and-vinyl factory models. These treasures, which are transformed into realistic creations through a careful, painstaking process, are among the most beloved... Tags: vintage dolls | dolls | collectibles | doll clothes | doll furniture Shop for related items Collectible Dolls Buying Guide by Collecting dolls is both a pastime and a passion. Whether you're looking for a collectible doll reminiscent of your childhood, selecting a gift for a special child, or investing in a vintage doll for your... Tags: porcelain dolls | antique dolls | doll furniture | cloth dolls | plastic dolls Shop for related items Dolls Selling Guide by Got a collection collecting dust? Outgrown your childhood Barbie dolls? Gone from Cabbage Patch Kids to Bratz? Whether you're an experienced collector or simply looking to sell a few children toys around your... Tags: selling | dolls | barbie | american girl | bratz Shop for related items Selling dolls on Ebay from a Buyers point of view. by jjharcks( 587) I have been a doll collector for many years. I search for dolls almost every day on Ebay and have learned quite a bit about the practice of selling of dolls here. I would like to share how I go about deciding... Tags: selling dolls | dolls | porcelain dolls | doll sellers | Tonner dolls 2353 of 2396 people found this guide helpful Shop for related items Collectible American Girl Dolls: An Insider's Guide by mama_salama( 1583) I INTRODUCTION "White body", "pre-Mattel", and "artist mark"are words used in describing the popular 18" American Girl dolls. But, what do these terms mean? Are they even important? This guide will define... Tags: "American Girl" | Dolls | Felicity | Collectibles | pleasant company 2068 of 2092 people found this guide helpful Shop for related items Page 1 of 120 Previous1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 |

Thursday, October 4, 2012

New Information on a Beloved Book about a Doll

Original Hitty
Hitty (short for Mehitabel) is a tiny wooden doll found by author Rachel Field in a New York City antique shop in the winter of 1927. The original Hitty doll was carved from mountain ash wood, about 6½ inches tall, with pegged arms and legs, each pair moving together.
The exceptionally-personable doll inspired author Rachel Field and illustrator Dorothy Lathrop to create the Newbery award-winning children's book, Hitty, Her First Hundred Years.
Since its release in 1929, the book has charmed generations of Hitty lovers. They admire Hitty's calm, indomitable spirit as she meets and overcomes many setbacks and adventures, from the time she was first carved by the old Irish peddler in the Preble house, around 1827, until she was finally resigned to the New York City antique shop, to be found by Field. The original Hitty is now on display at the Stockbridge Library Museum, in Stockbridge, Massachusetts. http://hittypreble.com/originalhitty.html

Wednesday, October 3, 2012

An Apologia for Countess Erzebet Bathory: Just in Time for Halloween

An Apologia for Countess Erzebet Bathory: Just in Time for Halloween: They have not done Erzebet yet, but I love this site by Shiva Rodriguez. I have their Catherine Howard doll. The links are fun, too. http...

Anthropomorphic Test Dummies

This was an interesting story on the evolution of crash test dummies on CBS This Morning today. The ATDs are now so state of the art, that they are effective in reducing the number of traffic fatalities to the lowest point they have been since the late 40s when these numbers were first recorded. Dolls, and this is what they are, are saving peoples' lives. The dummies are repaired after every crash. Some may rememer the plush dolls and little plastic figures made during the late 80s and 90s as toys to promote public safety. Most of the TYCO figures and dolls were made in 1992. This isn't the first time dolls have saved lives; see our blog Doll Museum which is a chronological museum of doll history where we discuss Ushabti and tomb figures that were buried with people in place of live humans in the Ancient World. Also, magic, medicinal, and ritual figures like Mandrake figures, fertility dolls, good luck dolls, etc., were meant to cure human ailments and improve the human condition. Finally, there are the Resuca Annie dolls and other mannikins used to tech CPR and hosptial procedure. The most famous of these are the lifesized chase hospital dolls. There are also baby mannikins used to teach childcare, and dolls and puppets galore used in therapy, Acupunture figrues, and models of the human body used in anatomy classes. Here is the link to watch the story from CBS This Morning: http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=7424112n&tag=showDoorFlexGridRight;flexGridModule Here is a story about them from ExPonent:http://www.exponent.com/anthropomorphic_test_dummy_atd_laboratory/ Anthropomorphic Test Devices, a.k.a. crash test dummies, are often times a critical element of a test or evaluation. An environmentally controlled laboratory at Exponent's TEC includes fixtures and equipment for test dummy calibration and maintenance. The family of Hybrid III dummies: 12-month-old, three-year-old, six-year-old, 5th percentile adult females, 50th percentile males, and the 95th percentile male, are included in TEC's test dummy inventory. In addition to Hybrid III dummies, Exponent's TEC has side-impact, Hybrid II test dummies and a six-month CAMI. TEC's test dummies can be modified to meet the anthropometry (height, weight, and body measurements) required for an investigation or evaluation. Furthermore, special application test dummies can also be made available at Exponent's TEC upon a client's request
Here is information about the toys, with some photos:
Tyco stumbled upon one of the great toy licenses in history when they got the Incredible Crash Dummies. Who would have thought that public service mascots would make such great toys? The success of the series lay in the fact that playing with the toys involved crashing them into stuff, which is something that some sadistic kids did with their other toys. Some of these were rereleased by Mattel (which now owns Tyco) in 2005. They also produced new sets. Checklist Vince Slick Larry Spin Daryl Spare Tire Skid the Kid Hubcap and Bumper Crash Car with Dash Student Driver Car with Axel Crash Cycle Crash Chopper Crash ATV with Flip Crash Lawn Mower with Wack Crash Go-Cart with J.R. Crash N Bash Chair Crash Test Center Slam Cycle Crash Plane Crash Cab Dummy Derby Car Bash N Bomber Car Citgo Slick and Spin Pitstop Pro-Tek Suit Slick Pro-Tek Suit Spin Pro-Tek Suit Bull Pro-Tek Suit Daryl Pro-Tek Suit Spare Tire Pro-Tek Suit Chip Pro-Tek Suit Dent Dirt Digger Flip Over Truck Junkman Piston Head Jack Hammer Sideswipe 'Bot Hauler Junkbot Wrecker Crash Cannon Junkyard Playset Ted with Video Junkman with Video http://www.virtualtoychest.com/i/incrediblecrashdummies/incrediblecrashdummies.html

Monday, October 1, 2012

Doll Repair Tranquility

It dawns on me that I actually have some peace, some tranqility at this early hour. My cat, Emma, aka Lady Gaga de Bathory, is snoozing on her baby blanket, with her dolls and stuffed mousie toys lined up next to her. She has just hopped into the bathtub after my husband showered. She is our mermaid cat. Yesterday is our late dog Killer Lord Byron's anniversary with us; we brought a little black scotty/poodle mix home in a shoe box that he couldn't climb out of, in a terrible storm. I loved him. He came home in 1977, and he was with me till he passed away in my Dad's arms from a stroke.
Killie didn't like dolls; he had his own squeaky toys, buried with him in a quiet patch of woods we own. When my mom and I came back from a doll show and laid out our finds on my bed, he took a peek inside the room, left, and returned with his sqeaky monkey doll, and jumped in the middle of the bed. He had a lamb and black dog he loved, and some knitted toys my mom made. I still have them in his memory. Yet, he hated a lifesized boxer that is a nice plush addition to the collection, and he had Raggedy Ann in a death grip, by her throat one fine day. Repairing and making dolls is something that goes hand in hand with my collecting, though my Mom would say, "Don't make too many; We're running out of room!!"" Little did she know. Over the years, I've repaired my compo dolls, painted blind dolls into visionm again, put together and glued all kinds of dolls, sewed them, made clothes, created them using xeroxed photos of dolls heads and bodies that I built up with clay or play dough and then painted. I used mole fur for hair, a la Dr. Scholls, on the advice of author Catherine Christopher, and I used Q-tips for limbs on tiny dolls. I made Kleenex dolls in imitation of cornhusk dolls, but made soap,c oornhusk, leaf, dirt clay dolls, cookie dolls, marshmallow dolls, twig dolls, apple heads, salt clay dolls, paper dolls by the hundreds if not thousands. Some had patterns, some art projects, like my Milliners Model head. My friend Violet Page showed me how to make bodies for china heads, and my friend Michael Canadas from my California days explained to me how to dress a doll without a pattern and how to make my own patterns. I'm no Mrs. Westfall, who did a great gook on doll repair, or Mrs. Clear, law degree notwithstanding. But, I fis my own. I won't do it for others, though I've dressed a baby now and then, but I will work on mine. I restore, not make over completely. Wear is part of a doll's story. My friend ML just brought me another group of vintage fifties/sixties dolls htat need help. I started cleaning them up yesterday, and put the arm on one using surgical tape, which is a godsend for doll doctors. I will put oup their photos as soona s I can get them back from Walgreens. My mom and I liked knitted outfits, and she was a mster knitter. I will have a whole gallery devoted to the dolls she dressed, knitted and otherwise. Even when she died, she was working on a doll outfit, and I found a whole basket of doll clothes. How I miss her. I nearly gave up on the dolls when she died, but I realized they are what keep me going, and keep her alive for me. We boight baby clothes for them, and little girls dresses, especially antique and vintage. That is what my dolls that are newly fixed are wearing. I just found a pink, smokced dress in a check pattern that fits a companion doll that I had to put back together. Antother is wearing an infant girl pirate Halloween outfit. Like many, I keep stash of doll shoes and wigs, small buttons and trims, doll socks, etc. Children's shoes and booties make good additions to doll costumes as do muffs and small hats and purses. They cheer me up. I recent 90% off find at B. Franklin's helped shoe a lot of customers at my museum. They all look very nice when lined up. I have dolls that our pristine, and antique, and all original, MIB, etc. We value them, too, but I can't help but enjoy working ont hem, and rescuing a doll that was destined for the Landfill, and maybe a watery grave in the River, to be rescued by the LLW Barge!