Children of Japan

Children of Japan
Courtesy, R. John Wright

The Jumeau 201

The Jumeau 201
Courtesy Theriault's and Antique Doll Collector Magazine

Hinges and Hearts

Hinges and Hearts
An Exhibit of our Metal Dolls

Google+ Followers

Tuxedo and Bangles

Tuxedo and Bangles

A History of Metal Dolls

A History of Metal Dolls
Now on Alibris.com and In Print! The First Book of its Kind

Alice, Commemorative Edition

Alice, Commemorative Edition
Courtesy, R. John Wright

Translate

Emma, aka, La Contessa Bathory

Emma, aka, La Contessa Bathory
Her Grace wishes us all a Merry Christmas!

Annabelle

Annabelle

Emma Emmeline

Emma Emmeline
Our New Addition/fond of stuffed toys

Cloth Clown

Cloth Clown

Native American Art

Native American Art

the triplets

the triplets

c. 1969 Greek Plastic Mini Baby

c. 1969 Greek Plastic Mini Baby
Bought Athens on the street

Iron Maiden; Middle Ages

Iron Maiden; Middle Ages

Sand Baby Swirls!

Sand Baby Swirls!
By Glenda Rolle, courtesy, the Artist

Glenda's Logo

Glenda's Logo
Also, a link to her site

Sand Baby Castaway

Sand Baby Castaway
By Glenda Rolle, Courtesy the Artist

A French Friend

A French Friend

Mickey

Mickey
From our friends at The Fennimore Museum

2000+ year old Roman Rag Doll

2000+ year old Roman Rag Doll
British Museum, Child's Tomb

Ancient Egypt Paddle Doll

Ancient Egypt Paddle Doll
Among first "Toys?"

ushabti

ushabti
Egyptian Tomb Doll 18th Dynasty

Ann Parker Doll of Anne Boleyn

Ann Parker Doll of Anne Boleyn

Popular Posts

Tin Head Brother and Sister, a Recent Purchase

Tin Head Brother and Sister, a Recent Purchase
Courtesy, Antique Daughter

Judge Peep

Judge Peep

Hakata Doll Artist at Work

Hakata Doll Artist at Work
From the Museum Collection

Follow by Email

Japanese Costume Barbies

Japanese Costume Barbies
Samurai Ken

Etienne

Etienne
A Little Girl

Happy Heart Day

Happy Heart Day

From "Dolls"

From "Dolls"
A Favorite Doll Book

Popular Posts

Jenny Wren

Jenny Wren
Ultimate Doll Restorer

Our Friends at The Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum

Our Friends at The Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum

Baby Boo 1960s

Baby Boo 1960s
Reclaimed and Restored as a childhood Sabrina the Witch with Meow Meow

Dr. E's on Display with sign

Dr. E's on Display with sign

Dolls Restored ad New to the Museum

Dolls Restored ad New to the Museum
L to R: K*R /celluloid head, all bisque Artist Googly, 14 in. vinyl inuit sixties, early celluloid Skookum type.

Two More Rescued Dolls

Two More Rescued Dolls
Late Sixties Vinyl: L to R: Probably Horseman, all vinyl, jointed. New wig. R: Effanbee, probably Muffy, mid sixties. New wig and new clothing on both. About 12 inches high.

Restored Italian Baby Doll

Restored Italian Baby Doll
One of Dr. E's Rescued Residents

Dolls on Display

Dolls on Display
L to R: Nutcrackers, Danish Troll, HItty and her book, Patent Washable, Mechanical Minstrel, Creche figure, M. Alexander Swiss. Center is a German mechanical bear on the piano. Background is a bisque German costume doll.

A Few Friends

A Few Friends
These dolls are Old German and Nutcrackers from Dr. E's Museum. They are on loan to another local museum for the holidays.

Vintage Collage

Vintage Collage
Public Domain Art

The Merry Wanderer

The Merry Wanderer
Courtesy R. John Wright, The Hummel Collection

The Fennimore Doll Museum

The Fennimore Doll Museum

Robert

Robert
A Haunted Doll with a Story

Halloween Dolls Displayed in a Local Library

Halloween Dolls Displayed in a Local Library

The Cody Jumeau

The Cody Jumeau
Long-faced or Jumeau Triste

German Princesses

German Princesses
GAHC 2005

A Little PowerRanger

A Little PowerRanger
Halloween 2004

The Island of the Dolls

The Island of the Dolls
Shrine to Dolls in Mexico

Based on the Nutshell Series of Death

Based on the Nutshell Series of Death
Doll House murder

Popular Posts

Total Pageviews

A lovely dress

A lovely dress

Raggedy Ann

Raggedy Ann
A few friends in cloth!

Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum, WI

Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum, WI
Pixar Animator's Collection

Little PM sisters

Little PM sisters
Recent eBay finds

Dressed Mexican Fleas

Dressed Mexican Fleas

Really old Dolls!

Really old Dolls!

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Some Miscellany

Thank you to Kimmee for the moving comments she made after I postedon 9/11. It is amazing how we, as one human family, can reach out to each other after such a horrific tragedy. We have had a week of ups and downs at the museum; we sold our first book on Amazon, and a big thank you to that customer! I spent Sunday doing some reorganizing and arranging of tenants, and I went to a yard sale that may have been comprised of possessions of my 7th grade math teacher. My husband sums her up well,"she was a nice lady, but a terror in class. I still have the scar on my hand from where I drove the pencil point into it out of fear." I was scared to death of her, but she liked me, and used to talk to me about cradles and making doll clothes for her granddaughter. What did I find? I wicker doll carriage, and a wooden doll crib, among other things. I just missed out on a set of plastic dollhouse furniture.

My thoughts are random tonight; I finished one book on collecting from my Borders stash, "The Error World," about stamp collecting, my other love, and various relationships and collections. I am no reading "Finders Keepers," about the seamy underworld of antiquities collecting, museums, and archaeology. It is very cool now, and the days get dark earlier; I have mixed feelings about that. Halloween looms over us, and the harvest moons are coming, and do indeed shine very bright.

I like to sit outside and drink coffee, book, or doll restoration project in hand, and just think. Summer isn't summer anymore; it seldom is for us who work all year, but there is still something elegiac and deathly poetic about the changing leaf colors, and the flowers that begin to wither away.

I will post some new photos along the side, just things to look at. The conference where I am reading papers about dolls is coming in November, and we are very excited. I found a small beanie doll for everyone who comes to the panel.

Recently, I picked up a copy of Lewis Sorensen's scrapbook, containing many news articles and ads about his dolls and waxworks. I found many interesting thins about him and his work. I remember reading about his death, and also seeing dolls and figures he had created in California. Kimme might remember the old Indiana Antiques on 2nd Street in San Jose, where they used to carry a pricey but fantastic collection of antiques. They had the pumpkin head he restored. I nearly bought her, too.

Happy dolling as September fades. For those of us who are inveterate collectors, the temptation to pick up a leaf to fold in the pages of a book is now and then overwhelming. But, give into it, live life, enjoy, and remember that dolls, like other artifacts of our lives, can survive after us, and tell our stories.

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Thank you Doll Castle News: Bibliography Doll and Toy Sources

We would like to thank Doll Castle News for reviewing my book, A Bibligraphy of Doll and Toys Sources in the latest issue of their magazine. They are a wonderful publication for those who love dolls and collecting, and they exhibit all that is good in the business, collecting, and publishing worlds. They are a family-owned magazine, and they cover al aspects of doll collecting. They reach out to a general and authoritative audience, and cover doll history, making, news, books, crafts, museums, and important collections. They do not focus on money. I really enjoyed their article "What is a Good Doll?" which exemplifies the spirit of collecting and sharing knowledge, and why being a doll snob does not pay.

I hope you all get to review the magazine. You may find them at Doll Castle News Magazine, keyword on Google. Also, this family has for many years supported charities and sent dolls, toys, clothing and other items to children in Reservation schools. My club at school has been emulating them for the last year or so, and we send items to The Sun Valley Indian School in Arizona.

Hope everyone is well. Happy Doll Collecting Month!

Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Nearly 8,000!

My gratitude goes out to the people all over the world who view and read this blog; we are nearly 8,000! My goal is to be over 10,000 views by 2012! Thank you to everyone; I welcome comments and ideas. If you like this blog, view, also Doll Museum on blog spot, which is my chronological web museum about the history of dolls.

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

McKinley Soap Doll

Today is the anniversary of McKinley's assasination. His story is a sad one for many reasons, not the least of which was the devastation brought to his wife. She was an invalid, and he a loving and devoted husband who cared for her. Here is a photo of the McKinley soap baby, a "frozen Charlotte" type doll, made to commemorate his election. These events took place on or near my grandfather's birth in 1897, and on or near the year of my favorite book's publication, Dracula! The true political doll has a tag or button with McKinley's name, see Helen Young's 1967, The Complete Book of Doll Collecting.

Monday, September 12, 2011

Rosale Whyel; last sale

Just A Little Reminder...

Come help us Celebrate the final Anniversary- our 19th Birthday!!

Saturday, September 10th- Museum 10am to 5pm
Birthday Cake
Door Prizes
Surprises All Day Long!
Party Room Fun- Doll Dressing, Doll Hair Styling, Pin Clothes Doll Making, Paperdolls...

and SALE, SALE, SALE!
Museum 35-75% off! Plus an additional 10% for Members!
Rosie's Too 45% off! Plus an additional 10% for Members!

Saturday, September 10th - Friday, September 16th
Museum Store Sale- Saturday 10am to 5pm, Sunday 1 to 5pm, Monday thru Friday 10am to 5pm
Rosie's Too Sale- Saturday 11am to 4pm, Thursday 11am to 8pm

Everything is on sale- Antiques, Modern Collectibles, Robert Tonner, Madame Alexander, Corolle, Vogue, Books, Exclusives, Kathe Kruse, and More!





Rosie’s Too Sale-

Rosie's Too
221 106th Ave NE
Bellevue WA
425-455-0363
Shelley Helzer
Co-Director
Rosalie Whyel Museum of Doll Art
Ph 425-455-1116 Fx 425-455-4793
www.dollart.com

Sunday, September 11, 2011

9/11/2011

I feel I must say something to commemorate the day, that I call "the worst day ever." We were not near any of the places hit; I was in class, teaching my college kids literature, when the latecomers came running in with the story of a plane hitting the World Trade Center. We went on a few minutes, and then the second sotry came of the second plane, and we sent to the student lounge. We are a samll school; I was the academic dean, and only I and a couple of teachers and the school psychologist were there. At least five kids went running for their phones; someone in their families worked at the Pentagon, or were near Ground Zero. The girl next to me was shaking uncontrollably; her husband was supposed to be near Ground Zero for a conference. She couldn't reach him by phone. That afternoon, she discovered he hadn't gone to the conferenc that day, and had rented a car to drive home.

The brother of one of my colleagues we learned later, died in one of the towers. My cousin by marriage, a day trader, was talking to colleagues and friends in Cantor Fitzgerald when the phone died. Many of them apparently did not come out. And, the girl who owns my favorite yarn shop across the street from work was a survivor; she had worked in the towers.

I thought of my Dad, who had been there late in 1976. He wanted to take me there to see the Towers; he said there were stores full of dolls from many countries. I thought of an ad I had seen the week before; there was a photo of the towers, with the caption "something will happen on September 11th." They meant they were introducing a new computer software. Little did they, and we know.

As soon as I could, I did what I always did in times of crisis; I called my mother. I had called her in 1993 when the first attack on the twin towers took place, when the Challenger exploded, when Oklahoma City was bombed, and during the Columbine disaster. I wanted to call her today; I can't. She died three years ago. That first Christmas, we joined others and bought RWB ornaments, and little fire fighter and police dolls. At the stores, others were buying them, too, and they said, as we chose what to buy, " we have to buy them; someone has to do something."

Today, may we think on those who lost their lives, and on those who have died since in the wars that have ensued. Bless them and their families and friends who have survived. There is no closure for grief; only memories, only rembrance. That, we will always have. May God Bless all of us who live in this world, even those who sadly see this as a day of celebration. Little do they know. Maybe someone can forgive them, for they know not what they do, either. Above all, God Bless the Union, and God Bless the United States. Have a thoughtful, safe, and careful day today, September 11, 2011.

Friday, September 9, 2011

New Issue of American Journal of Play

The newest edition of the American Journal of Play
is now accessible free online at www.journalofplay.org.

Go out and play! Parents today are less likely than ever to utter these words. However, hovering helicopter parents who restrict their kids’ unstructured play may actually harm, rather than help, children according to an interview with Lenore Skenazy (syndicated columnist and author of Free-Range Kids) and Hara Estroff Marano (author of A Nation of Wimps). The authors’ condemnation of overprotective parenting appears in a special themed issue of the American Journal of Play devoted entirely to the importance of free play among children.

Guest editor Peter Gray, Research Professor of Psychology at Boston College, has gathered a distinguished group of contributors who probe the near-extinction of free play and its effects on children and society from historic, anthropologic, and psychological perspectives:

“Why Parents Should Stop Overprotecting Kids and Let them Play,” an interview with Lenore Skenazy and Hara Estroff Marano

“The Special Value of Children’s Age-Mixed Play” by Peter Gray, Research Professor of Psychology at Boston College

“The Decline of Play and the Rise of Psychopathology in Children and Adults” by Peter Gray,Research Professor of Psychology at Boston College

“Evolutionary Functions of Social Play: Life Histories, Sex Differences, and Emotional Regulation” by Peter LaFreniere, Professor of Psychology at the University of Maine

“Marbles and Machiavelli: The Role of Game Play in Children’s Social Development” by David F. Lancy, Professor of Anthropology at Utah State University, and M. Annette Grove

“Empowering Groups That Enable Play” by David Sloan Wilson, SUNY Distinguished Professor for the Department of Biology and Anthropology at Binghamton University; Danielle Marshall, Senior Manager of Research and Education at KaBOOM!; and Hindi Isherhoff, former board president of City Repair

“The Design Your Own Park Competition: Empowering Neighborhoods and Restoring Outdoor Play on a Citywide Scale” by David Sloan Wilson, SUNY Distinguished Professor for the Department of Biology and Anthropology at Binghamton University

The American Journal of Play is published by The Strong in Rochester, New York. For more information, visit www.journalofplay.org.






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National Museum of Play
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Rochester, New York 14607
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Thursday, September 8, 2011

Victoria and Albert Museum Shop

See, Below; I like to be a public service for collectors!

First chance to view our fantastic NEW Autumn range!
From: V&A Shop
email@mail.vandashop.com To: etsag1998
Date: Thu, Sep 8, 2011 3:54 am

If you cannot view this message, click here. To ensure your V&A Shop Online e-mails get to your inbox, please add email@mail.vandashop.com to your address book or safe list.





A first chance to view our fantastic new autumn range! Choose from literally hundreds of tempting new designs, including the best of the new season's jewellery and fashion, as well as toys, homeware and more.


'Hidden Owl' Teacup (Web Only)
£18.00

Routemaster Bookend (Web Only)
£20.00

Bright Fringe Bracelet
£95.00

'I Can't Look I Must Look' Print
£25.00



Dotty Dip Dye Scarf


£40.00

Clara Button and the Magical Hat Day
£10.99

Squirrel Stacking Game (Web Only)
£50.00

Autumn Leaf Sticky Note (Web Only)
£3.50



Hearts Hole Puncher (Web Only)
£12.00

'Abstract Rainbow' Iphone 4 Skin
£12.00

Boulder Bracelet by Helveta Vyotlag
£150.00

'Alice in Wonderland' Text Poster
£40.00



Stag Head (Medium) (Blue Floral)
£35.00

Rocking Chair Calendar
£17.50

Pattern Hook Earrings by Sibilia
£85.00

Sunography Fabric Kit (Web Only)
£15.00



Unravelling Knitted Calendar 2012
£75.00

Knitting: Fashion, Industry, Craft (PB)
£35.00

Anemone Brooch by Cilea (Green)
£45.00

Agenda Graphic Building Diary
£15.00











Come and see the V&A Shop at:-

Victoria and Albert Museum
Cromwell Road
London SW7

Open daily between 10:00 and 17:45
Late night every Friday until 21:45

Victoria and Albert Museum Shop

See, Below; I like to be a public service for collectors!

First chance to view our fantastic NEW Autumn range!
From: V&A Shop
email@mail.vandashop.com To: etsag1998
Date: Thu, Sep 8, 2011 3:54 am

If you cannot view this message, click here. To ensure your V&A Shop Online e-mails get to your inbox, please add email@mail.vandashop.com to your address book or safe list.





A first chance to view our fantastic new autumn range! Choose from literally hundreds of tempting new designs, including the best of the new season's jewellery and fashion, as well as toys, homeware and more.


'Hidden Owl' Teacup (Web Only)
£18.00

Routemaster Bookend (Web Only)
£20.00

Bright Fringe Bracelet
£95.00

'I Can't Look I Must Look' Print
£25.00



Dotty Dip Dye Scarf


£40.00

Clara Button and the Magical Hat Day
£10.99

Squirrel Stacking Game (Web Only)
£50.00

Autumn Leaf Sticky Note (Web Only)
£3.50



Hearts Hole Puncher (Web Only)
£12.00

'Abstract Rainbow' Iphone 4 Skin
£12.00

Boulder Bracelet by Helveta Vyotlag
£150.00

'Alice in Wonderland' Text Poster
£40.00



Stag Head (Medium) (Blue Floral)
£35.00

Rocking Chair Calendar
£17.50

Pattern Hook Earrings by Sibilia
£85.00

Sunography Fabric Kit (Web Only)
£15.00



Unravelling Knitted Calendar 2012
£75.00

Knitting: Fashion, Industry, Craft (PB)
£35.00

Anemone Brooch by Cilea (Green)
£45.00

Agenda Graphic Building Diary
£15.00











Come and see the V&A Shop at:-

Victoria and Albert Museum
Cromwell Road
London SW7

Open daily between 10:00 and 17:45
Late night every Friday until 21:45

Tonner News

I only have one, but they are wonderful dolls!

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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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Hello, Friends!

We just wanted to drop you all a line to to remind you about the
LittleMissMatched
one hour special on QVC tomorrow: Thursday, September 8, 2011, from 1pm to 2pm
EDT, and we hope you'll be tuning in! Update your calendars accordingly!

We cannot wait for you to see the Gift Set we've masterfully put together, and
you
won't be able to get it anywhere else, so this is one hour you won't want to
miss!

We know you're super excited about the brand new LittleMissMatched QVC Special
tomorrow,
and we are, too! After all, this will be the debut of Tonner Toys and our
LittleMissMatched
Dolls, so there is much to be excited about!

Thank you for your support,

Team Tonner Toys

Wednesday, September 7, 2011

We are over 7000 Strong!

To the over 7000 folks who have visited and read my blog-Thank You! Each and everyone is welcome, and I appreciate you all.

I have been reading many books on dolls and collecting, some positive, in fact most, some not. I am enjoying Rheims' The Secret Life of Objects, and Garfield's The Error World [Stamps; remember Max Johl, the great Philatelist, was Janet Pagter Johl's husband!], which both have a balanced approach leading to the positive. Then, there is a book on hoarding, which includes collectors, which I stress is not the same. It is at Borders, and very cheap, but I resist reading it. I might get too depressed.

With the economy still bad, dolls and other collectibles remain a luxury. I am heartened and surprised online vendors and the antique stores and malls have kept going. That is because dolls are a passion, and a healthy one at that. My collections have kept me sane, and interested in life through very bad things. I don't sell, but have written books about them and been paid to stage classes and programs about them. I've been on television, and obliquely, on the radio, because of them. They were the special activity I shared with my mom, and she lives again when I am working on them or writing about them.

I love the variety of my collection, and was spurred on by Helen Young in this. I loved making dolls for others, too, and dressing them for my cousins and other little friends; I share Beth March's passion for this.

Have been reading the Lifetime Career School's course, and have been inspired to repair again, and pick up on dressing and restoring. It is a nice thing to do when money is tight, but also a good way to take inventory and keep things in perspective.

Now, I share my hunts with a small circle of good friends. They are not competitive, and we do not collect the same thing, and find things and share with each other. It is my mother's legacy continuing, and I know at least one of them goes with me in her memory, and in the memory of our good mutual friend Greg, was was taken from us too young and too soon. He loved antiques, and I dedicated my bibliography to him. He believed in me and the museum, and was always finding books and little dolls, even an autographed photo of Collen Moore.

Forgive my typing, and visit my other blogs. Enjoy your hobbies and passions, and let the nay sayers live in their sterile, smug little worlds. They will die sooner and be more frustrated.

The "other" Doll Museum by Dr. E

This is the link for our chronological web museumo of The History of Dolls:
http://dollmusem.blogspot.com/

Remember that September is Doll Collecting Month!

Friday, September 2, 2011

The Dolls of Glenda Rolle

There was a great article featuring the imaginative and wonderful dolls of our friend Glenda Rolle, written by the talented Mr. R. Lane Herron. It was published in the current issue of Doll Castle News, which we at The Museum love very much. Glenda has shared some photos of her fantastic and imaginative dolls which she has allowed us to share. There is more about Glenda and her art on her own sites, and on our group, DollsAntique on Facebook.

I love the combination of sheer fancy and natural materials like sand in Glenda's work, and the little bit of the gothic and theatrical that inspire her work. She pushes the creativity of dollmaking, and the definition of "doll" to the limit, which is something I love to do, too.

Enjoy the photos, forgive the typos, and remember September is Doll Collecting Month!

Subscribers Welcome to Recirculate! Writing World

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THE EDITOR'S DESK: The Best Laid Plans, by Moira Allen
THE INQUIRING WRITER: Submitting Online Work to Contests,
by Dawn Copeman
NEWS FROM THE WORLD OF WRITING
FEATURE: I Love You, My Little Cabbage: Using Foreign Words in
Your Fiction, by Cora Bresciano
COLUMN: Free Stuff for Writers: Summer's Over... I Hope,
by Aline Lechaye
THE WRITE SITES -- Online Resources for Writers
The Author's Bookshelf

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---> http://wwx.Writing.Com/ <--- Become a fan on Facebook: http://facebook.com/WritingCom Follow us on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/WritingCom **************************************************************** WRITERSCOLLEGE.COM has 57 online courses. Prices are low. If you can reach our web site, you can take our courses. http://www.WritersCollege.com ***************************************************************** WRITE FOR CHILDREN. Achieve your dream of becoming a published author. Writing books and stories for children is a great place to start. Learn the secrets 1-on-1 from a pro writer. Train online or by mail. Free Test offered. http://www.writingforchildren.com/H0514 ***************************************************************** You CAN Make a Great Full-Time Living As a Writer! Once you know the simple secrets of writing for this little-known lucrative market. You can work from home, be in control of your schedule and earn an average of $75-$150 an hour. http://www.thewriterslife.com/a63/full-time-living ***************************************************************** THOUSANDS OF WRITERS USE FANSTORY.COM FOR: * Feedback. Get feedback for every poem and story that you write. * Contests. Over 40 contests are always open and free to enter. * Rankings. Statistics will show you how your writing is doing. http://www.fanstory.com/index1.jsp?at=38 ***************************************************************** FROM THE EDITOR'S DESK ================================================================= The Best Laid Plans... This wasn't the editorial I PLANNED to write. But then, it hasn't been the week I planned to have. On Tuesday, for example, I planned a day dedicated to writing. (Well, OK, plus a few games of "Jewel Quest Heritage, expert level" -- but MOSTLY writing.) That plan fell apart when the house began to shake. And shake. As I calmly strolled outdoors to watch my plants doing a little dance on the deck, I could hear things toppling from shelves throughout the house. Fortunately, only my nerves were shattered! Now, I'm a California girl, so I'm no stranger to quakes. Unfortunately, that means I know that if a quake keeps going (or worse, pauses and then starts up stronger than before), that could mean trouble. Fortunately, it didn't. And since this was the worst quake on the East Coast since 1897, I wasn't too worried about a recurrence. But I found it tough to focus on writing for the rest of the day. Thursday, I meant to write when we came home from dinner at Don Pablo's -- and found myself, instead, waiting in the car for the AAA truck to come along and jumpstart our battery, while hoping that the ominous clouds wouldn't cut loose JUST yet because we'd managed to roll down the windows and now couldn't roll them up again. Today I'm pulling patio furniture off the deck to prepare for a possible hurricane. (Though, in all fairness, it looks like we may only get hit by a "severe tropical storm...") Granted, most of my weeks aren't like this, and I hope yours aren't either! But it doesn't take earthquakes and hurricanes to disrupt our lives. My sister, for example, has been plagued for two weeks with equipment failures that are preventing her from running her own home business; each new "fix" seems to bring a new set of problems. What does this have to do with writing, other than the admission that I haven't been doing a lot of that this week? Simply this: I know too many folks who are waiting to START writing when their PLANS come together. As soon as I do this... As soon as I get that project squared away... When I get all those things marked off my to-do list... When I'm past this difficult stage/phase/era of my life... When the kids are gone... When I retire... But as the commercial says, "Life comes at you fast." One minute you look like Fabio and the next... Well, like Fabio in old-man makeup. The problem with plans is that something ALWAYS manages to make things take longer than you planned. That set of errands that you thought would take one hour ends up taking three. A child gets sick and you spend the day in a waiting room. The car breaks down. The computer breaks down. Or you get to the keyboard at the end of the day and realize YOU'RE about to break down. The problem is two-fold. First, we have a tendency to "plan" to write AFTER something else. I'll write AFTER I finish this project, help my child with her homework, do the floors, do the dishes, do the shopping, have a cup of coffee, do my exercise. (Well, admittedly, since it's as easy for me to postpone exercise as writing, I do make an effort to put that FIRST.) The point is, we are forever putting writing SECOND. The other half of the problem is a mirror of the first: We are experts at finding something, anything to do INSTEAD of writing. After all, we need to eat, so the grocery shopping must get done, right? My child's homework is due tomorrow. My paying assignment is due tomorrow. I need to exercise. The floor is a mess. It's true that there will always be something else that needs doing. Conversely, there will ALWAYS be something else that needs doing. (I know, that sounded like the same statement, but it isn't. Quite.) In short, we always plan to write "after" -- but we always manage to find something else to do "before." Here's another way to visualize the problem. Imagine you have two boxes on your desk, "A" and "B." In Box A is a single sheet of paper describing the writing project you want to tackle: A story, a poem, a novel, whatever. In Box B is everything else -- a sheet of paper for every task, project, distraction and recreational activity in your day or week. Needless to say, THAT stack is pretty tall! Chances are, when you look at the two boxes, Box A seems "optional" compared to all the tasks clamoring from Box B. I'll get to it, you tell yourself, just as soon as Box B is whittled to a manageable size. Only Box B never "whittles." No matter what you subtract, things are always being added. But the only thing getting added to Box A is a growing layer of dust. It's easy to dismiss this as a "classic definition of procrastination," but it's also life. Box B will never, ever be empty. If it were, you'd be dead. Since dying is not an effective writing strategy, something else needs to change. The only approach I know of is to change one word in your vocabulary: Change "after" to "before." Instead of saying, "I'll get to my writing AFTER I do X," say "before." I will write BEFORE I start the laundry. I will write BEFORE I go to the grocery store. (The food will still be there!) I will write BEFORE playing Jewel Quest. I will record that TV show and write BEFORE I watch it. It doesn't mean that the tasks in Box B get postponed forever. But imagine what would happen if, instead of "planning" to spend an hour on Box B and then, "afterwards," start to write, you wrote for an hour first? All that other stuff would still get done. But by switching to writing "before" rather than "after," your story might actually get done as well! -- Moira Allen, Editor P.S. The Editor extends heartfelt wishes to readers who have experienced outages or damage from Hurricane Irene. She is happy to report that she emerged unscathed, but suspects many of our readers may not be able to say the same. ***************************************************************** CHILDREN'S WRITERS Read by over 1,000 children's book and magazine editors, this monthly newsletter can be your own personal source of editors' wants and needs, market tips, and professional insights. Get 2 FREE issues to start. http://www.thechildrenswriter.com/AK114 ***************************************************************** The Inquiring Writer: Submitting Online Work to Contests ================================================================= By Dawn Copeman Last month our question came from Barb Joy. She wrote: "I was thinking about submitting a short story or two to a writing contest but hesitated because I already have them on my website, although I haven't sold any yet. "Would it be unethical to send off a story I had on my website?" Hmm, this is a tricky one. I remember when I ran NewbieWriters we had a forum where you could post work in progress for review and critique. One member was most indignant to learn that because he had posted his work on the site it had been thrown out of a contest he had entered. But this isn't always the case. "It depends on the rules of the contest," advised Derek Thompson. "Sometimes the rules specifically state that any entry cannot have been published before either in print or online. That takes care of that. "However, there is nothing to prevent you taking a story you've posted online (especially one that you've received constructive feedback for) and rewriting it as something new. Bear in mind that if you enter a contest it is possible that the judges may do a quick web search for the finalists." Connie Berridge writes: "As a writer with several of my works on my website I think it would be perfectly okay to submit anything on your site. "You are the author and it is your site, which you have purchased. You may want to write to ask the contest site for guidance. It is like the case of SIMSUBS (simultaneous submissions). Some sites do not care as long as you report to them if the item has been picked up by another. A simple note to that effect is much appreciated. "If you have not sold the particular story, and used it primarily only on your site I do not see a problem. But it is just my opinion. I would ask the site their view before submitting or include a note with the submission that the story has not been sold and is only in print on your website. "Each site may vary in its decision." I would advise anyone who is entering their work into a contest to first of all find out if they will or won't accept work that has been published anywhere online, on your site or on a critique site. If they won't accept that piece, then rework it into something new. Don't think that just because it's hidden away in a huge blog or critique site that the contest judges won't find it -- if the work is online when it shouldn't be, they will find out. Personally, this is why I would only ever put excerpts of work onto sites for critique. Now, onto this month's question, which comes from Vanessa. She is intrigued by the whole idea of using a pseudonym for her writing and wants to know how other writers do it. She wrote: "How do you pay the taxes with different names? Must they be separate? How do you keep your identity private and separate when you are sending things via e-mail? Do you have different e-mail accounts in different pseudonyms? How do you keep it all straight with different pseudonym e-mail addresses?" So if you're a writer who uses a pseudonym Vanessa could use your help. Email your replies with the subject line: "Inquiring Writer" to editorial@writing-world.com. Also, I am running out of questions too. So if you want to put a question to our community, email me that to the same address. Until next time, Dawn Copyright 2011 Dawn Copeman **************************************************************** BEGINNERS! LEARN THE BASICS of writing for magazines and online publishers FREE from an experienced freelancer. Learn how to find ideas & markets, write queries that sell and get paid for your writing. Sign-up for free weekly writing tips. http://www.freelance-write-now.com ***************************************************************** NEWS FROM THE WORLD OF WRITING ================================================================= Forbes Lists World's Richest Authors ------------------------------------ Even though sales of hardcover books are falling, the top-earning authors are continuing to rake in the money, mainly due to increased e-book sales. To find out who is on the 'rich' list, visit: http://tinyurl.com/3lgmjzq Debut Author Joins Kindle Million Club -------------------------------------- Kathryn Stockett, whose first novel "The Help" is currently in the New York Bestseller list, has now also joined the Kindle Million club. The Kindle Million club is only for authors who have sold over 1 million copies in Amazon's Kindle Store. For more on this story visit: http://tinyurl.com/3uuhdhl Amazon Launches Daily Kindle Deal ---------------------------------- Visitors to the sites Kindle page will find a different book on offer every day. The page lists the title, a brief description of the book, the full price, the discounted price and how many hours are left until the deal ends. For more on this story visit: http://publishingperspectives.com/2011/08/amazon-offers-a-daily-e-book-deal/ ***************************************************************** EVERYHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SETTING FREELANCE FEES! Find out how to negotiate agreements, choose pricing strategies, define tasks, deal with difficult customers, and much more in "What to Charge: Pricing Strategies for Freelancers and Consultants" (2nd Edition) by Laurie Lewis. In print and Kindle from Amazon at http://tinyurl.com/setyourfees *************************************************************** Writing Jobs and Opportunities ================================================================= Fellowship Opportunities at Vermont Studio Center -------------------------------------------------- We are excited to announce the following fellowship awards available at our upcoming October 3rd deadline. All are welcome to apply; **applications must be received by October 3, 2011**. [NOTE: We have posted only those fellowships open to writers, and that are not limited to a small regional area; other fellowships for visual artists and regional writers are also available.--Editor] Vermont Studio Center Fellowships --------------------------------- (http://www.vermontstudiocenter.org/fellowships) Sixteen merit-based fellowships open to all visual artists and writers. Educational Foundation of America Fellowships --------------------------------------------- (http://www.efaw.org/index.html) Three merit-based fellowships available to emerging and mid-career artists and writers of color from the United States. Rona Jaffe Foundation Fellowship ---------------------------------- (http://www.ronajaffefoundation.org) One fellowship for an emerging woman writer who will be a first-time resident at VSC. This award includes a stipend of $1250 to help cover expenses associated with taking the residency, including but not limited to travel, rent, childcare or to replace lost income. Sustainable Arts Foundation Fellowship ----------------------------------------- (http://www.sustainableartsfoundation.org) One fellowship for an artist or writer who is raising young children; this award includes a $2,000 stipend to cover lost income, travel, child care, or other costs related to taking time away from the family. In addition to the VSC application form, applicants should submit a copy of a tax return (or other documentation) showing dependents under the age of 18. John Pavlis Fellowships ----------------------- Three awards for African-American visual artists and writers, with preference given to current students and recent graduates of Fisk University, Spelman or Morehouse Colleges. 9/11: 10 YEARS LATER + HOW DO YOU REMEMBER? ------------------------------------------- PenTales is collecting 119 original perspectives on 9/11. 10 years later we want to know: How do you remember it? Do you remember? Where were you when it happened? Does the day matter, then or now? Does remembering do any good? What does the day say about America and Americans? How has it shaped the first decade of the new millennium? How has it shaped you? We're accepting: -video (max. 1 minute) -photography (max. 2 images with short caption) -text (max. 500 words) Send in your submission to writepentales@gmail.com with the following in the subject line: "9/11, your name and location." We're accepting works until September 11, 2011 midnight. We'll present works in numerical order as they come in. Each featured piece will be introduced by our editors and the most original submissions compiled into a larger collection. http://www.pentales.com New Literary Press Open to Submissions -------------------------------------- Big Wonderful Press accepts many different types of submissions. Some categories have reading fees and some do not. This helps us support the website and author services/promotion. We often offer feedback on submissions, but cannot guarantee that we always will have comments for every manuscript. Before submitting, please read the About Big Wonderful Press page. http://www.bigwonderfulpress.com/submissions/ ***************************************************************** HOW TO WRITE YOUR BEST STORY. This inspiring, practical new book will help you write your best story and improve your chances to get published. These are the most durable, successful, and time-tested tips, techniques, and examples of best practices used by great writers. http://www.amazon.com/How-Write-Your-Best-Story/dp/1933987146 *************************************************************** FEATURE: I Love You, My Little Cabbage: Using Foreign Words in Your Fiction =============================================================== By Cora Bresciano When I was a child, my French-Canadian mother called me her little chou (pronounced "shoe"). In the summers, when we visited our French-speaking family in Quebec, my cousins were called chou or chou-chou by their mothers, as well. One summer evening, though, my aunt used the word chou as she was enticing us with the menu for that evening's dinner. I understood that haricots verts were green beans and pommes de terre were potatoes, but chou? Which food was her darling? I turned to my mother, who smiled wryly. "The cabbage," she replied. "Chou means 'cabbage.'" All that time, I had been my mother's little cabbage. This episode comes back to me whenever I set out to infuse my writing with a taste of the foreign. When our fiction is set in another country or our characters speak other languages, we have the opportunity to use foreign words and phrases to enhance our writing, to establish a real sense of place, to create an atmosphere that is distinctly not American. But how much do we include? How much do we translate? And what do we do with expressions like "my little cabbage" that are authentic in another language, but sound awfully strange in English? We want our readers to know that a foreign language is being spoken; we want to impart the flavor and rhythms of the foreign tongue. But we need to be understood, as well. We don't want readers to lose anything or to become irritated with a story because they're stumped by our use of foreign words. Let's say you've set your story in Italy. Your fictional heroine, Jennifer, is an American sculptor who's been living in Rome for the past ten years. She speaks Italian in her everyday life. When you write her dialogue, when you capture her neighbors chatting over the fence or the baker selling her bread, how do you remind your readers that these characters are speaking Italian? Here are six ways to do it: 1. Write some key words and phrases in the foreign language, but offer the English translation. Here's the scenario: Jennifer's favorite baker finds something sticking out of the fresh loaf of bread that he's about to hand her. You can capture the atmosphere of the scene by having him utter a short phrase in Italian. Then translate it for those readers who won't understand it. "C'é una chiave!" Sergio cried out in disbelief. It's a key! He held it up to the light. This approach offers the best of both worlds: authenticity and clarity. We get the real thing with the Italian, but if we can't understand what it means, we need only to read on a little further to find it translated for us. The reader gets to have the experience of the Italian language without feeling inadequate or frustrated. 2. Write some words and phrases in the foreign language, and don't translate them. Some simple foreign words are well-known to many English speakers. Hello, goodbye, thank you -- most of us remember these from our high school language classes. Consider sprinkling them through your chapters just as they are: "Buon giorno!" Jennifer's landlord called out a hearty greeting as he passed her on the stairs. Your reader will almost surely understand this brief bit of Italian, if only from all the Scorcese films she's seen. And even if you were writing in a less common language than Italian, your description of the phrase as a "hearty greeting" would clue the reader in. 3. Translate literally some unusual foreign expressions. This strategy needs to be handled carefully, though, to avoid sounding comical when you don't mean to. If I were to write a tender scene, in English, between my five-year old self and my French-speaking mother, I probably wouldn't have her call me her little cabbage and just leave it at that. Who could read that without laughing? What I might do is explain the use of the term earlier in the story, so that at the tender moment, I could write something like: She tousled my hair and tucked me into bed. "Goodnight, my little cabbage," she whispered as she turned off the light. This use of an unusual word that has already been explained would let the readers see it as a sweet endearment rather than as a strange epithet. It might, therefore, evoke smiles rather than guffaws, while reminding us that Maman is actually speaking français. 4. Infuse the cadence and the syntax of the foreign language into the dialogue that you write in English. Even when creating long stretches of dialogue that need to be written completely in English, you can keep the feel of the foreign language by incorporating some of its differences into the English. For example, the French usually use the pronoun on, or "one," rather than ils/elles ("they") or nous ("we"). So when Jennifer attends an opening of her work in Paris, the gallery owner might say to her at the celebratory dinner: "Does one eat head of veal in the United States?" This captures the cadence of the French and emphasizes that it is not really English that's being spoken. Asking "does one eat" in French doesn't have the formality that it does in English -- it's a perfectly casual expression. (And "head of veal" is a direct translation of tête de veau, one of the more exotic French dishes.) The simple practice of omitting contractions -- which other languages tend not to have -- from the dialogue that's supposed to be in another language also can make it sound "foreign." "Jennifer, do not cry!" Giuseppina hugged the sobbing sculptor. "This critic, he knows nothing about art!" Substituting "do not" for "don't" gives these lines an Italian feel. And in English, we would more likely say "This critic knows..." Saying "This critic, he knows..." mimics the Italian syntax. Though we're reading in English, this sort of phrasing reminds us that we're not in Kansas anymore. 5. Enhance the dialogue with descriptions of non-verbal communication. Being half Italian, I'm well acquainted with the Italian need to use hand gestures to communicate. Other cultures have similar propensities -- gestures, facial expressions, ways of moving the body that express what words cannot and that mark their exhibitors as being of a particular nationality. Include these non-verbal cues when you write dialogue in order to paint a clearer -- and more colorful -- picture of the foreign scene. For example, Jennifer's next-door neighbor might show his appreciation of the red wine she brings him like this: "He tasted the wine, then closed his eyes and brought the fingertips of his right hand together, touched them to his lips, gave them a kiss and let them burst apart from each other. The classic Italian gesture of deep appreciation, for food, for beauty, for love." As you can see, the non-verbal communication does a good job of substituting for a spoken line of dialogue. And it imparts a very Italian feel at the same time. 6. Write long passages in the foreign tongue; translate nothing. Okay, this is not a method I condone as a writer. Or appreciate as a reader. But it's precisely what Umberto Eco does. The author of The Name of the Rose regularly includes in his books passages written in Latin, Hebrew, and Greek -- and offers no translations. Of course, he is Umberto Eco, world-famous author and scholar, and he can pretty much do what he wants in print -- but I always find myself frustrated by his indifference to those of us who don't speak all the languages he does. For example, he ends the introduction to his famous book with a quotation in untranslated Latin: "In omnibus requiem quaesivi, et nusquam inveni nisi in angulo cum libro." Today, with the help of the Internet, you can find this quotation by Thomas à Kempis online. When I read the novel for the first time, though, in the late eighties, I had no idea what it meant, and no way to find out. And that's a shame, because when you do know, it ends the section nicely and it's also important and pertinent to the rest of the novel. The translation is: "I have searched for peace everywhere, but have not found it anywhere except in a corner with a book." Like Eco, you could, if you really wanted, leave things like this untranslated -- it is your story, after all, and if you want to be ornery or experimental, go ahead -- but as a general rule, I wouldn't suggest it. Hopefully our use of foreign words, phrases, and references to dear little cabbages will provide our readers with enjoyment, if not peace -- and at the very least, won't cause them confusion or frustration when they curl up in a corner with our books. >>--------------------------------------------------<< Cora is the Co-Founder and Co-Executive Director of Blue Planet Writers' Room, a non-profit organization that integrates the arts, technology, and international collaboration into the teaching of writing. Cora's own writing encompasses both fiction and non-fiction; her children's musicals have been produced in Florida and New York, and her short story, "The Mermaid," won the 2008 Brogan Award in Fiction. She earned her MFA in Creative Writing from Florida Atlantic University. Having grown up in a family of immigrants from two different countries, in a house where three languages were spoken, Cora has a special interest in writing about the spaces where cultures and languages meet. Copyright 2011 Cora Bresciano For more information on writing dialogue visit: http://www.writing-world.com/fiction/greenway6.shtml **************************************************************** EBOOK SELF-PUBLISHING EXPLAINED An epublishing revolution is sweeping the industry. We explain what is happening and show you how to self-publish your own ebooks. http://www.PublishYourOwnEbooks.com *************************************************************** Free Stuff for Writers: Summer's Over... I Hope =============================================================== By Aline Lechaye I'm glad that autumn is coming. Inspiration-wise, summer is probably the worst season for me. It's hot, the sun is shining, and all I want to do is hang out at the beach and read some book someone else has written. (Yeah, yeah, any excuse...) A tip for anyone out there who hates writing in summer: paste one of your writing samples into the analyzer at http://iwl.me/ and see which famous writer you write like. I don't know how accurate the results actually are, but it's hard not to feel inspired when it says you write like, say, Ernest Hemmingway. If you thought that you could only read "old" books for free on the internet, think again. I was surprised too when I stumbled across http://www.readanybook.com, a site that lets you read books for free online. Offerings include "The Host" by Stephenie Meyer, "The Lost Symbol" by Dan Brown, and the entire "Harry Potter" series. The site has its own online e-reader device (it looks like a miniature Kindle, but you can widen it to full screen) for displaying books. The main drawback of the e-reader is that it seems to mess up the page layouts, making words and sentences run together or end awkwardly. Hey Publisher sounds like the name of a writer created rock band, but it's actually a website that connects writers with publishers. Signing up for a writer account is free and once you have your writer's profile set up, you can upload your work (Hey Publisher uses Amazon-provided servers, and they have a 100% guarantee that no uploaded work will ever be lost -- impressive!), browse publishers, and submit your work. You'll receive email updates on the status of your submitted manuscripts, so you don't have to worry about accidentally missing an acceptance letter. Get started at http://heypublisher.com/ Backing up files has become more important in recent years, especially for writers. There's nothing more painful or frustrating than staying up all night working on an article and then coming back in the morning to find that your hard drive has decided not to work. Mozy (say it nice and slow and just enjoy how that sounds!) provides you with 2GB of space for free, and encrypts your files during backup and storage so that other users can't access them. The iPhone/Android app makes it easy to access your files anywhere. You can also schedule automatic backups. Find out more at https://mozy.com/home/free/. Author Lisa Angelettie's website has three marketing-related freebies that you'll want to look at if you're an article writer: A marketing e-course, an article success toolkit, and "The 3 Simple Secrets to Making Money Using Articles" report. Download at http://lisaangelettieblog.com/resources/. A friend sent me a link to http://www.the39dollarexperiment.com/. I confess I find the blogger's approach to getting free stuff novel. Basically, the $39 dollar experiment is a guy using thirty-nine dollars' worth of stamps to send a hundred letters to various companies asking for free stuff. Freebies he's received back include coupons, compressed air, teabags, and lip balm. He estimates that in total he's gotten about $272 in free products from companies like Carmex, Campbell's and Nestle. Interesting, but not something you'd quit your day job for! >>--------------------------------------------------<<

Aline Lechaye is a translator, writer, and writing tutor who
resides in Asia. She can be reached at alinelechaye@gmail.com.

Copyright 2011 Aline Lechaye

*****************************************************************

THE WRITE SITES
=================================================================
A Blogger's Books
-----------------
This is a great site for all bloggers and would-be bloggers. It
includes tips and hints on how to blog, resources and tutorials as
well as advice as to where to submit your blogs.
http://www.abloggersbooks.com/

Down the Tubes - How to write graphic novels
--------------------------------------------
Tips and advice on how to write for graphic novels from a former
editor at Marvel UK.
http://www.downthetubes.net/writing_comics/index.html

Worldbuilder Projects
---------------------
A site for fantasy novelists, this site helps you to find the tools
you need to create your fantasy worlds.
http://hiddenway.tripod.com/world/

****************************************************************

WIN PRIZES AND GET PUBLISHED! Find out how to submit your stories,
poetry, articles and books to hundreds of writing contests in the
US and internationally. Newly updated for 2010, WRITING TO WIN by
Moira Allen is the one-stop resource you need for contests and
contest tips. Visit Writing-WorldCom's bookstore for details:
http://www.writing-world.com/bookstore/index.shtml

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AUTHOR'S BOOKSHELF: Books by Our Readers
=================================================================

Lady Father, by Susan Bowman

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Have you just had a book published? If so, let our readers know:
just click on the link below to list your book.
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ADVERTISE in WRITING WORLD or on WRITING-WORLD.COM! For details
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Writing World is a publication of Writing-World.com
http://www.writing-world.com

Editor and Publisher: MOIRA ALLEN (editors@writing-world.com)

Newsletter Editor: DAWN COPEMAN (editorial@writing-world.com)

Copyright 2011 Moira Allen
Individual articles copyrighted by their authors.
Back issues archived at
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Subscribers are welcome to re-circulate.



The Strong Museum

From the National Museum of Play this month; we love them! They are our inspiration!

September 2011

Saturday & Sunday
September 10 & 11
Five Friends from Japan: Children in Japan Today exhibit closing

Saturday & Sunday
September 10 & 11
Literature Live: Meet Otto, the colorful pup

Wednesday, September 14
Making American Music
"The Music of Rodgers and Hammerstein" with Allyn Van Dusen
Call 263-2700 for tickets

Saturday & Sunday
September 17 & 18
Trains Weekend

Mondays, September 19 & 26
Toddler Book Club: Pirates

Friday, September 23
The museum will close to the public at 3 p.m.

Friday, September 23
The Play Ball fundraising gala

Saturday & Sunday
September 24 & 25
Football: The Exhibit opens

Monday, September 26
White House Garden Talk
Call 263-2700 for tickets

Visit the
online calendar
for more information!
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Have you put on your
tiara today?

Read the Play Stuff blog and learn about the transformative power of dress up.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



How do you get your
video game fix with
a remote control?

Learn more in the
CHEGheads Blog.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Follow the museum!

The museum will close to the public at 3 p.m.
on Friday, September 23.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Become a Member Today!
National Museum of Play membership is the best family entertainment value anywhere! Members enjoy:

• unlimited free general admission,
• discounted Dancing Wings Butterfly
Garden admission,
• discounts in the museum shops, and more!

Visit the membership website, the museum admissions desk, or call 585-263-2700 to purchase a membership.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Football: The Exhibit
Opens September 24
Get in the game! Come dressed in your favorite team colors and jump into the action when Football: The Exhibit opens September 24. Enjoy the sports-inspired antics of Crystal and Scooter from Just Clowning Around on Saturday at 11:30 a.m. and 1 and 2:30 p.m. and on Sunday at 1 and 2:30 p.m. Create pennants and pom-poms to cheer your team on and vote for your favorite team mascot.

The exhibit remains on view through January 8, 2012. Learn more

Football: The Exhibit is a traveling exhibit organized by the Arkansas Museum of Discovery.

Sponsored by




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

All Aboard for
Trains Weekend
Chug over for Trains Weekend on September 17 & 18 and see elaborate model train displays from 10 a.m.–4 p.m. on Saturday and noon–4 p.m. on Sunday.

Little engineers can make a hat, learn railroad safety from Operation Lifesaver, and take a free ride on the Strong Express or Elaine Wilson Carousel.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Garden Club Presents White House Historian
Learn the fascinating history of the White House gardens on Monday, September 26 at 10 a.m. at a talk by Dr. William Seale, a specialist in historic house restoration and author of numerous books about the White House and its gardens. The event is presented by the Rochester Garden Club, a generous funder of The Strong’s Discovery Garden. Tickets are $10 per person and can be purchased by calling 585-263-2700. (Price does not include museum admission.) Advance ticket purchase required.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


In the Shops in September

Buy 1, Get 1 FREE

Melissa & Doug Arts and Crafts Supplies

Items of equal or lesser value. While quantities last.
National Museum of Play at The Strong
One Manhattan Square • Rochester, NY 14607 • 585-263-2700
www.museumofplay.org







We Love the Victoria and Albert Museum; Especially at Christmas!!

V & A Christmas Cards:

If you cannot view this message, click here. To ensure your V&A Shop Online e-mails get to your inbox, please add email@mail.vandashop.com to your address book or safe list.





The V&A Shop has a wide selection of designs available ranging from decorative arts & crafts patterns to witty illustrations and designs created exclusively for the V&A. Combining great quality with value, packs of 20 cards start at just £4.00! Below are some of our bestselling and new designs for 2011.


'Penguin' Pack of 10 (Square)

£4.75

'Robin Bowl' Pack of 10 (Square)
£4.75

'Winter Trees' Pack of 12 (Luxury Wallet)
£7.50

'Private Eye' Pack of 12 (Luxury Wallet)
£7.50



'Robins and Holly' Pack of 10 (Square)


£4.75

'Reindeer' Pack of 10 (Square)


£4.75

'Two's Company' Pack of 10 (Rectangle)
£4.75

'Santa Claus Tree' Pack of 10 (Rectangle)
£4.75



'Woodland Xmas' Pack of 10 (Large Rectangle)
£5.00

'Pudding Boy' Pack of 10 (Large Rectangle)
£5.00

'John French' Pack of 10 (Square)


£4.75

'12 Days'
Pack of 10 (Large Rectangle)
£5.00



'House in the Snow' Pack of 10 (Large Rectangle)
£5.00

'Annie Lennox' Pack of 10 (Square)


£4.75

'Robin' Pack of 10 (Rectangle)


£4.75

'Tree and Angels' Pack of 10 (Square)


£4.75



'A Merry Cheery O' Pack of 10 (Square)


£4.75

'Retro Robin'
Pack of 20 (Mini Box)


£4.00

'Gloria' Pack of 10 (Rectangle)


£4.75

'Father Christmas' Pack of 10 (Large Rectangle)
£5.00











Come and see the V&A Shop at:-

Victoria and Albert Museum
Cromwell Road
London SW7

Open daily between 10:00 and 17:45
Late night every Friday until 21:45






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The British Museum

The first of some new newsletters, which I am allowed to pass on. Enjoy.

What's on
Exhibitions

Treasures of Heaven
saints, relics and devotion in
medieval Europe

Until 9 October 2011
Open late Fridays

Grayson Perry
The Tomb of the Unknown Craftsman
6 October 2011 – 19 February 2012
Members free

Australia Landscape
Kew at the British Museum
Until 16 October 2011
Free

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Touring exhibitions and loans
China: Journey to the East
Weston Park Museum, Sheffield
17 December 2011 – 12 April 2012

Fantastic Creatures
Ulsan Museum, Ulsan, Korea
Until 21 October 2011

Events

Passport to the afterlife
A free family digital workshop at the British Museum.
Saturday 3 September, 11.30–15.30

Embroidered harmonies: Bulgarian choral music
Delight in the dissonant harmonies and exuberant trills of the acclaimed choir’s live performance at the British Museum.
Saturday 3 September, 14.30–15.00

Landscape: longing and livelihoods
A British Museum/Kew debate at the British Museum. Introduced by Neil MacGregor and opening remarks by His Excellency John Dauth, Australian High Commissioner.
Tuesday 6 September, 18.30
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