Children of Japan

Children of Japan
Courtesy, R. John Wright

The Jumeau 201

The Jumeau 201
Courtesy Theriault's and Antique Doll Collector Magazine

Hinges and Hearts

Hinges and Hearts
An Exhibit of our Metal Dolls

Google+ Followers

Tuxedo and Bangles

Tuxedo and Bangles

A History of Metal Dolls

A History of Metal Dolls
Now on Alibris.com and In Print! The First Book of its Kind

Alice, Commemorative Edition

Alice, Commemorative Edition
Courtesy, R. John Wright

Translate

Emma, aka, La Contessa Bathory

Emma, aka, La Contessa Bathory
Her Grace wishes us all a Merry Christmas!

Annabelle

Annabelle

Emma Emmeline

Emma Emmeline
Our New Addition/fond of stuffed toys

Cloth Clown

Cloth Clown

Native American Art

Native American Art

the triplets

the triplets

c. 1969 Greek Plastic Mini Baby

c. 1969 Greek Plastic Mini Baby
Bought Athens on the street

Iron Maiden; Middle Ages

Iron Maiden; Middle Ages

Sand Baby Swirls!

Sand Baby Swirls!
By Glenda Rolle, courtesy, the Artist

Glenda's Logo

Glenda's Logo
Also, a link to her site

Sand Baby Castaway

Sand Baby Castaway
By Glenda Rolle, Courtesy the Artist

A French Friend

A French Friend

Mickey

Mickey
From our friends at The Fennimore Museum

2000+ year old Roman Rag Doll

2000+ year old Roman Rag Doll
British Museum, Child's Tomb

Ancient Egypt Paddle Doll

Ancient Egypt Paddle Doll
Among first "Toys?"

ushabti

ushabti
Egyptian Tomb Doll 18th Dynasty

Ann Parker Doll of Anne Boleyn

Ann Parker Doll of Anne Boleyn

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Tin Head Brother and Sister, a Recent Purchase

Tin Head Brother and Sister, a Recent Purchase
Courtesy, Antique Daughter

Judge Peep

Judge Peep

Hakata Doll Artist at Work

Hakata Doll Artist at Work
From the Museum Collection

Follow by Email

Japanese Costume Barbies

Japanese Costume Barbies
Samurai Ken

Etienne

Etienne
A Little Girl

Happy Heart Day

Happy Heart Day

From "Dolls"

From "Dolls"
A Favorite Doll Book

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Jenny Wren

Jenny Wren
Ultimate Doll Restorer

Our Friends at The Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum

Our Friends at The Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum

Baby Boo 1960s

Baby Boo 1960s
Reclaimed and Restored as a childhood Sabrina the Witch with Meow Meow

Dr. E's on Display with sign

Dr. E's on Display with sign

Dolls Restored ad New to the Museum

Dolls Restored ad New to the Museum
L to R: K*R /celluloid head, all bisque Artist Googly, 14 in. vinyl inuit sixties, early celluloid Skookum type.

Two More Rescued Dolls

Two More Rescued Dolls
Late Sixties Vinyl: L to R: Probably Horseman, all vinyl, jointed. New wig. R: Effanbee, probably Muffy, mid sixties. New wig and new clothing on both. About 12 inches high.

Restored Italian Baby Doll

Restored Italian Baby Doll
One of Dr. E's Rescued Residents

Dolls on Display

Dolls on Display
L to R: Nutcrackers, Danish Troll, HItty and her book, Patent Washable, Mechanical Minstrel, Creche figure, M. Alexander Swiss. Center is a German mechanical bear on the piano. Background is a bisque German costume doll.

A Few Friends

A Few Friends
These dolls are Old German and Nutcrackers from Dr. E's Museum. They are on loan to another local museum for the holidays.

Vintage Collage

Vintage Collage
Public Domain Art

The Merry Wanderer

The Merry Wanderer
Courtesy R. John Wright, The Hummel Collection

The Fennimore Doll Museum

The Fennimore Doll Museum

Robert

Robert
A Haunted Doll with a Story

Halloween Dolls Displayed in a Local Library

Halloween Dolls Displayed in a Local Library

The Cody Jumeau

The Cody Jumeau
Long-faced or Jumeau Triste

German Princesses

German Princesses
GAHC 2005

A Little PowerRanger

A Little PowerRanger
Halloween 2004

The Island of the Dolls

The Island of the Dolls
Shrine to Dolls in Mexico

Based on the Nutshell Series of Death

Based on the Nutshell Series of Death
Doll House murder

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A lovely dress

A lovely dress

Raggedy Ann

Raggedy Ann
A few friends in cloth!

Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum, WI

Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum, WI
Pixar Animator's Collection

Little PM sisters

Little PM sisters
Recent eBay finds

Dressed Mexican Fleas

Dressed Mexican Fleas

Really old Dolls!

Really old Dolls!

Saturday, June 7, 2014

12 Display Tips for your Dolls; a Guest Post

Our guest blogger is Kristin McWharter of Theriault's, the famous doll auction company. This is an illustrated piece, with wonderful photos, all courtesy of Theriault's.com. Displaying dolls can be one of the most rewarding and most challenging aspects to collecting. A creative and engaging display draws viewers in and transforms an otherwise overlooked doll into a true treasure. Here are 12 tips on how to leave a lasting impression with a display that showcases the best assets of your collection.
1. Tell a story The most dynamic and interesting displays are those that tell a story in the minds of their viewers. Start with a theme. Whether it’s a holiday, a color palette, or a certain feeling, find a narrative that takes your display a step further. Choosing your dolls and accessories based on the story you want them to tell breathes new life into your collection, and keeps your viewer engaged.
2. Create Levels Before you begin arranging your dolls, make a note of where eye level is, usually around 5ft. This is where your viewer is most naturally inclined to focus their attention and will emphasize key details. Then build your display with a variety of heights and depths, keeping your main focal points around eye level. By doing this, you allow the viewer’s eye to move around the room, making your display more dynamic, while still showcasing what’s important. Pyramids made of props and pedestals work great, as do vertically stacking shelves and display cabinets.
3. Keep it clean You don’t want to clutter your display; remember less is more. Too many objects can be visually difficult to read and your items can get lost (defeating the purpose of displaying them in the first place). If you have a large number of dolls and objects, simplify your design by organizing them based on size or color. Create small “vignettes” or focal points that allow your viewer to focus in on a few dolls rather than find themselves overwhelmed.
4. Focal points and patterns As viewers we are attracted to pattern, so use it to your advantage while creating your displays. Dolls and objects of similar colors, shapes, and sizes can be arranged to move the eye around the room or to emphasize a certain focal point. Play with asymmetry and irregularity to highlight certain items. For example, grouping many red objects alongside one blue object will fix the eye upon the object that is breaking the pattern, making the blue item particularly noticeable to the viewer. Patterns also give your display an overall sense of aesthetic design and appeal.
5. Be bold Avoid the predictable. Incorporate unexpected items and contrasting colors to create a sense of whimsy in your display. Small visual surprises make your design entertaining and draw the viewer in. Have an area that’s a bit boring? Add a bouquet of silk flowers or an oversized prop to make it more interesting.
6. Strike a pose They are dolls after all. Don’t be afraid of posing them with a little personality!
7. What are your dolls looking at? What direction your dolls are facing can be just as important as where you place them. Imagine that every doll you have displayed is angled to be facing a certain corner of the room. Suddenly that corner becomes a character in your display as viewers turn to see what all the dolls are staring at! Use the glance of your dolls to your advantage to highlight a focal point, create pattern, or emphasize your theme.
8. Incorporate a backdrop The color of your wall might not be the best color or texture to accent your display. Incorporating a backdrop can be a useful tool to add drama and cohesion to your design. Hanging colored paper or a panel of fabric can be a quick and easy way to create an environment for your dolls. You can even place a painting or poster behind your dolls to create a sense of landscape and mise en scene!
9. Domes and Display Cabinets Not only are they protective, but domes and display cabinets can be a great opportunity to give smaller dolls the attention they deserve. Isolate a few dolls within their own mini display scene, and observe how small gestures and details can really stand out within a larger display and feel truly magical.
10. Remember your theme It’s easy to get distracted by small details or get carried away on a tangent, so take a moment to remember your theme. A clear and concise story makes your display more engaging and is a great strategy to prevent your design from becoming too cluttered or overwhelming. Every now and then take a step back and look at your display from a distance. Is your theme clear? Does it grab your attention? Don’t be afraid to go back and change what’s not working.
11. Let there be light Good lighting can be one of the best ways to make your dolls really stand out. Highlight your best dolls and objects using spotlighting, or create a special tone and ambiance by incorporating a soft colored light. With so many fixtures and bulbs available, the possibilities are plentiful. However, not taking light into consideration could result in unattractive shadows, or worse, fading. Protect your dolls from bright windows and light sources that could be harmful, and instead control the lighting to showcase their best features.
12. Be creative Let your imagination run wild. Building displays can be one of the most fun and rewarding aspects of collecting. Change your displays every few months to try out new ideas and spotlight different dolls. Move things around, experiment, try something different, and most importantly, have fun. Founded in 1970 Theriault’s specializes exclusively in the appraisal and auction of antique dolls and childhood ephemera. The firm's offices and cataloging center are headquartered in Annapolis, Maryland, and the company hosts live auctions in major cities throughout the United States. For more information please visit www.Theriaults.com

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