Children of Japan

Children of Japan
Courtesy, R. John Wright

The Jumeau 201

The Jumeau 201
Courtesy Theriault's and Antique Doll Collector Magazine

Hinges and Hearts

Hinges and Hearts
An Exhibit of our Metal Dolls

Google+ Followers

Tuxedo and Bangles

Tuxedo and Bangles

A History of Metal Dolls

A History of Metal Dolls
Now on Alibris.com and In Print! The First Book of its Kind

Alice, Commemorative Edition

Alice, Commemorative Edition
Courtesy, R. John Wright

Translate

Emma, aka, La Contessa Bathory

Emma, aka, La Contessa Bathory
Her Grace wishes us all a Merry Christmas!

Annabelle

Annabelle

Emma Emmeline

Emma Emmeline
Our New Addition/fond of stuffed toys

Cloth Clown

Cloth Clown

Native American Art

Native American Art

the triplets

the triplets

c. 1969 Greek Plastic Mini Baby

c. 1969 Greek Plastic Mini Baby
Bought Athens on the street

Iron Maiden; Middle Ages

Iron Maiden; Middle Ages

Sand Baby Swirls!

Sand Baby Swirls!
By Glenda Rolle, courtesy, the Artist

Glenda's Logo

Glenda's Logo
Also, a link to her site

Sand Baby Castaway

Sand Baby Castaway
By Glenda Rolle, Courtesy the Artist

A French Friend

A French Friend

Mickey

Mickey
From our friends at The Fennimore Museum

2000+ year old Roman Rag Doll

2000+ year old Roman Rag Doll
British Museum, Child's Tomb

Ancient Egypt Paddle Doll

Ancient Egypt Paddle Doll
Among first "Toys?"

ushabti

ushabti
Egyptian Tomb Doll 18th Dynasty

Ann Parker Doll of Anne Boleyn

Ann Parker Doll of Anne Boleyn

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Tin Head Brother and Sister, a Recent Purchase

Tin Head Brother and Sister, a Recent Purchase
Courtesy, Antique Daughter

Judge Peep

Judge Peep

Hakata Doll Artist at Work

Hakata Doll Artist at Work
From the Museum Collection

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Japanese Costume Barbies

Japanese Costume Barbies
Samurai Ken

Etienne

Etienne
A Little Girl

Happy Heart Day

Happy Heart Day

From "Dolls"

From "Dolls"
A Favorite Doll Book

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Jenny Wren

Jenny Wren
Ultimate Doll Restorer

Our Friends at The Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum

Our Friends at The Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum

Baby Boo 1960s

Baby Boo 1960s
Reclaimed and Restored as a childhood Sabrina the Witch with Meow Meow

Dr. E's on Display with sign

Dr. E's on Display with sign

Dolls Restored ad New to the Museum

Dolls Restored ad New to the Museum
L to R: K*R /celluloid head, all bisque Artist Googly, 14 in. vinyl inuit sixties, early celluloid Skookum type.

Two More Rescued Dolls

Two More Rescued Dolls
Late Sixties Vinyl: L to R: Probably Horseman, all vinyl, jointed. New wig. R: Effanbee, probably Muffy, mid sixties. New wig and new clothing on both. About 12 inches high.

Restored Italian Baby Doll

Restored Italian Baby Doll
One of Dr. E's Rescued Residents

Dolls on Display

Dolls on Display
L to R: Nutcrackers, Danish Troll, HItty and her book, Patent Washable, Mechanical Minstrel, Creche figure, M. Alexander Swiss. Center is a German mechanical bear on the piano. Background is a bisque German costume doll.

A Few Friends

A Few Friends
These dolls are Old German and Nutcrackers from Dr. E's Museum. They are on loan to another local museum for the holidays.

Vintage Collage

Vintage Collage
Public Domain Art

The Merry Wanderer

The Merry Wanderer
Courtesy R. John Wright, The Hummel Collection

The Fennimore Doll Museum

The Fennimore Doll Museum

Robert

Robert
A Haunted Doll with a Story

Halloween Dolls Displayed in a Local Library

Halloween Dolls Displayed in a Local Library

The Cody Jumeau

The Cody Jumeau
Long-faced or Jumeau Triste

German Princesses

German Princesses
GAHC 2005

A Little PowerRanger

A Little PowerRanger
Halloween 2004

The Island of the Dolls

The Island of the Dolls
Shrine to Dolls in Mexico

Based on the Nutshell Series of Death

Based on the Nutshell Series of Death
Doll House murder

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A lovely dress

A lovely dress

Raggedy Ann

Raggedy Ann
A few friends in cloth!

Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum, WI

Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum, WI
Pixar Animator's Collection

Little PM sisters

Little PM sisters
Recent eBay finds

Dressed Mexican Fleas

Dressed Mexican Fleas

Really old Dolls!

Really old Dolls!

Thursday, April 15, 2010

Research Files, Twitter, and Anne Boleyn

Another week draws to a lazy, sultry close. We had wonderful unseasonably warm weather, and violets and grape hyacinths bursting forth. My viola, which sprang two years ago from the remains of an annual, is growing again. I've protected it with garden spikes to avoid lawn mower devastation which took place last year.

My classes are studying capital punishment again, and I admit I love discussing The Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death with them, as well as bringing out my CP toys, the headless historical doll of Katharine Howard, all the Anne Boleyn dolls [not headless or gruesome], the toy guillotines and Halloween prop electric chairs, the Joan of Arc paper dolls, etc. My favorite passage about these toys comes from a book which quotes Goethe in a letter where he asks his mother to buy his two year old son a miniature guillotine. Mamma is shocked and "reads the riot act" to the great poet. That in itself is worth reading to a good English major.

My thoughts drift to what do we as researchers do when we come across these little tidbits? Granted, we store much on our computers and flash drives, but I have another method involving portable research which works; the travelling file [not to be confused with travelling pants, gnomes, or other nomadic objects].

This method works for any form of research, and three-ring binders will work. I ususally keep one year's worth of information in these research files, say 2009-2010. At the end of the year, I go through them and store in file cabinets or shelves the information I want to keep. I share the rest with other collectors, or recycle it some way. If one selects the binder route, I'd spring for nice white binders with page inserts for covers and spines. I also love the clear plastic page protectors and dividers of all types. My other method involves buying a small accordion file, any type, or a plastic case for storing scrap book paper. [This is why I don't join a scrap booking club; they would not appreciate the unspeakable uses I find for their supplies!]. To tailor the research file to doll collecting, you need the following besides the accordion files and labels for each section:

1. Two or three good fashion catalogs; I like Neimann Marcus, Chicos, pages from the fashion issue of Vogue, which usually is out by August or September.

2. Two or three of your favorite doll catalogs from 2009-2010. These can include inserts from Target and Toys R Us, auction catalogs, toy catalogs, mail order catalogs, doll house catalogs, etc.

3. A list of sources including locations of doll shows, museums, favorite websites, directions to locales, doll exhibits, antique shows, flea markets, doll conventions, etc. which you want to attend during the year.

4. Your receipts and cancelled checks spent on dolls for 2010; these can be copies if you need the originals for your taxes. By the same token, I like to print out and keep eBay information and listings for dolls that I have bid on, and certainly purchased. The same goes for ETSY and other online auctions.

5. Temporary inventory forms if you need them, so that you can keep track of new acquisitions.

6. Copies of specific articles I find useful for dolls I'm working with during the year. These might include patterns and directions for making dolls and doll parts. Newsletters and other clippings are also part of this file.

7. Related historical materials, e.g., sources on regional costumes for foreign dolls, copies of vintage materials like Godey's, paper dolls, including copies or Internet printouts that I find useful for historical background, children's literature, or historical location for dolls or their makers.

8. Address information for people connected in the doll/antique world.

9. Miscellaneous information relevant to your individual collections.

10. A good field guide or price guide, like Miller's or Denise Van Patten's excellent guide book. [harder to store in a binder; then you may just want to scan or use relelvant pages or newsletters from Denise's About.com site.]

Label each section as needed, e.g., to correspond with those described above.

Sort the materials accoringly, and make sure you can carry the binder or file easily. A nice, eco-friendly tote like those sold in discount stores, grocery stores, and book stores would do the trick. Keep it in your car where it is accessible if you go to a library, museum, or other site away from home to work.

Have Fun!

A note on collecting; if you find printable/copy free materials on the web, print them, and keep them in a binder. My favorite is Marilu's Paper Doll Page. Not all of these sites stay up forever,and while they may never acheive great value, Internet printouts will make interesting future collectibles. For the price of ink, one can have a fantastic paper doll collection. Great for those on a budget. And, you know what they say, "When the going get's tough, the tough surf for paper dolls!"

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