Children of Japan

Children of Japan
Courtesy, R. John Wright

The Jumeau 201

The Jumeau 201
Courtesy Theriault's and Antique Doll Collector Magazine

Hinges and Hearts

Hinges and Hearts
An Exhibit of our Metal Dolls

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Tuxedo and Bangles

Tuxedo and Bangles

A History of Metal Dolls

A History of Metal Dolls
Now on Alibris.com and In Print! The First Book of its Kind

Alice, Commemorative Edition

Alice, Commemorative Edition
Courtesy, R. John Wright

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Emma, aka, La Contessa Bathory

Emma, aka, La Contessa Bathory
Her Grace wishes us all a Merry Christmas!

Annabelle

Annabelle

Emma Emmeline

Emma Emmeline
Our New Addition/fond of stuffed toys

Cloth Clown

Cloth Clown

Native American Art

Native American Art

the triplets

the triplets

c. 1969 Greek Plastic Mini Baby

c. 1969 Greek Plastic Mini Baby
Bought Athens on the street

Iron Maiden; Middle Ages

Iron Maiden; Middle Ages

Sand Baby Swirls!

Sand Baby Swirls!
By Glenda Rolle, courtesy, the Artist

Glenda's Logo

Glenda's Logo
Also, a link to her site

Sand Baby Castaway

Sand Baby Castaway
By Glenda Rolle, Courtesy the Artist

A French Friend

A French Friend

Mickey

Mickey
From our friends at The Fennimore Museum

2000+ year old Roman Rag Doll

2000+ year old Roman Rag Doll
British Museum, Child's Tomb

Ancient Egypt Paddle Doll

Ancient Egypt Paddle Doll
Among first "Toys?"

ushabti

ushabti
Egyptian Tomb Doll 18th Dynasty

Ann Parker Doll of Anne Boleyn

Ann Parker Doll of Anne Boleyn

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Tin Head Brother and Sister, a Recent Purchase

Tin Head Brother and Sister, a Recent Purchase
Courtesy, Antique Daughter

Judge Peep

Judge Peep

Hakata Doll Artist at Work

Hakata Doll Artist at Work
From the Museum Collection

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Japanese Costume Barbies

Japanese Costume Barbies
Samurai Ken

Etienne

Etienne
A Little Girl

Happy Heart Day

Happy Heart Day

From "Dolls"

From "Dolls"
A Favorite Doll Book

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Jenny Wren

Jenny Wren
Ultimate Doll Restorer

Our Friends at The Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum

Our Friends at The Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum

Baby Boo 1960s

Baby Boo 1960s
Reclaimed and Restored as a childhood Sabrina the Witch with Meow Meow

Dr. E's on Display with sign

Dr. E's on Display with sign

Dolls Restored ad New to the Museum

Dolls Restored ad New to the Museum
L to R: K*R /celluloid head, all bisque Artist Googly, 14 in. vinyl inuit sixties, early celluloid Skookum type.

Two More Rescued Dolls

Two More Rescued Dolls
Late Sixties Vinyl: L to R: Probably Horseman, all vinyl, jointed. New wig. R: Effanbee, probably Muffy, mid sixties. New wig and new clothing on both. About 12 inches high.

Restored Italian Baby Doll

Restored Italian Baby Doll
One of Dr. E's Rescued Residents

Dolls on Display

Dolls on Display
L to R: Nutcrackers, Danish Troll, HItty and her book, Patent Washable, Mechanical Minstrel, Creche figure, M. Alexander Swiss. Center is a German mechanical bear on the piano. Background is a bisque German costume doll.

A Few Friends

A Few Friends
These dolls are Old German and Nutcrackers from Dr. E's Museum. They are on loan to another local museum for the holidays.

Vintage Collage

Vintage Collage
Public Domain Art

The Merry Wanderer

The Merry Wanderer
Courtesy R. John Wright, The Hummel Collection

The Fennimore Doll Museum

The Fennimore Doll Museum

Robert

Robert
A Haunted Doll with a Story

Halloween Dolls Displayed in a Local Library

Halloween Dolls Displayed in a Local Library

The Cody Jumeau

The Cody Jumeau
Long-faced or Jumeau Triste

German Princesses

German Princesses
GAHC 2005

A Little PowerRanger

A Little PowerRanger
Halloween 2004

The Island of the Dolls

The Island of the Dolls
Shrine to Dolls in Mexico

Based on the Nutshell Series of Death

Based on the Nutshell Series of Death
Doll House murder

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A lovely dress

A lovely dress

Raggedy Ann

Raggedy Ann
A few friends in cloth!

Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum, WI

Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum, WI
Pixar Animator's Collection

Little PM sisters

Little PM sisters
Recent eBay finds

Dressed Mexican Fleas

Dressed Mexican Fleas

Really old Dolls!

Really old Dolls!

Monday, August 20, 2012

So, when is it an addition, cont'd

When is a hobby too much? Anyone ever read "A Gentle Madness," about collecting in general, or hobbies in particular, or "Magnificent Obsessions?" Is it when we run out of space? Mary Randolph Carter, author of American Junk, Garden Junk, Big City Junk, etc., would say of a true collector, "Never ask, "where are you going to put it?" She was also a vice president for art/marketing, etc. for Ralph Lauren.
Me, I'd say it's when your family, not you alone, mind you, but your family, has to eat ramen noodles every night because you blew the family savings on a doll, or whatever you collect. Disappointment notwithstanding, when you are so upset at losing a doll at auction, or when someone bought it before you could, that you get depressed, can't eat, don't enjoy anything, cry repeatedly, and are in general, too disconcolate to function. Of course, business people might be excused for feeling this way if their livelihood depended on one big find or pick, but CF "The American Pickers' Guide to Picking" by Libby Calloway and Maureen Stanton's "Killer Stuff, Ton's of Money" on this last point about getting sold out or bought out from under.
Personally, I think when people collect dolls and think they talk to them, or that the dolls talk back, it's time to stop. And, that is a collection of a different category. When the dolls tire us, when we no longer like them or get pleasure out of them, it's time to stop.
Just my thoughts.
There is a difference between passion, and addiction. Passion leads to educational opportunities and new discoveries. It promotes life long learning, and can lead to a business. Collectors are considreed merchants, and thus, experts under the UCC. Passion can lead people to become writers, and can inspire their imagination. In a world of economic recession where the mantra has become, "simplify, simplify," collectors are looked at askance. Collecting anything today is not waht it was sixty years go, or even 40 years ago. I've seen doll collecting go from a growing hobby, still within most peoples' financial reach, to a fad, to the insanity of the 80s which encompassed the CPK mania, to a highend investment goal for French Bisque dolls and other antiques, to a steady decline in some categories due to eBay and the need for many dealer/collectors to downsize. Also, I think the hobby has changed because most collectors are aging, and many famous collectors and even dealers, have died or retired. Too many doll museums have had to close, and not enough younger people are interested. I attended one of our regional shows this weekend, and there was a good crowd, but it was very small. There were great selections, and still lots of variety, but I saw many old, familiar faces missing. The buying crowd was mostly over 40. Vinyl dolls and Barbies were doing very well. Two years ago, the last time I was there, there were dealers with various ball-jointed dolls, like Pullip and Dalfie. There were a lot of 20-somethings and younger children looking at the toys, too. This time, I didn't see any modern ball jointed dolls, and no teens and 20s running around. The toy dealers were gone, too. This, I think, made a difference in clientele.
So, is there a future for us who want to collect, and keep our collections, long term, or...forever? How do we get younger people and kids interested. It is true that most kids are plugged in and prefere gadgets to toys. The rest of their lives is "hands on," with play dates, and clubs, sports teams, and competetitions.
My old sport and other great love, gymnastics, is by itself a death knell for many childhood pastimes, including collecting. The nuclear family itself shifts for these young athletes, who must now start from the cradle if they wish to be Olympic quality or set for international competition. I watched the homecoming of one of them on Dateline, and I had to think if it was all worth it. Too much too soon; our definition of childhood itself may be reverting to 18th c. and earlier conceptions of the child as a miniadult in training for adult roles and responsibilities. Yet, see our other blog, Doll Museum, there were dolls, as toys, even then, and into prehistory.
I would be interested in hearing readers thoughts. Happy Dolling!!

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