Children of Japan

Children of Japan
Courtesy, R. John Wright

The Jumeau 201

The Jumeau 201
Courtesy Theriault's and Antique Doll Collector Magazine

Hinges and Hearts

Hinges and Hearts
An Exhibit of our Metal Dolls

Google+ Followers

Tuxedo and Bangles

Tuxedo and Bangles

A History of Metal Dolls

A History of Metal Dolls
Now on Alibris.com and In Print! The First Book of its Kind

Alice, Commemorative Edition

Alice, Commemorative Edition
Courtesy, R. John Wright

Translate

Emma, aka, La Contessa Bathory

Emma, aka, La Contessa Bathory
Her Grace wishes us all a Merry Christmas!

Annabelle

Annabelle

Emma Emmeline

Emma Emmeline
Our New Addition/fond of stuffed toys

Cloth Clown

Cloth Clown

Native American Art

Native American Art

the triplets

the triplets

c. 1969 Greek Plastic Mini Baby

c. 1969 Greek Plastic Mini Baby
Bought Athens on the street

Iron Maiden; Middle Ages

Iron Maiden; Middle Ages

Sand Baby Swirls!

Sand Baby Swirls!
By Glenda Rolle, courtesy, the Artist

Glenda's Logo

Glenda's Logo
Also, a link to her site

Sand Baby Castaway

Sand Baby Castaway
By Glenda Rolle, Courtesy the Artist

A French Friend

A French Friend

Mickey

Mickey
From our friends at The Fennimore Museum

2000+ year old Roman Rag Doll

2000+ year old Roman Rag Doll
British Museum, Child's Tomb

Ancient Egypt Paddle Doll

Ancient Egypt Paddle Doll
Among first "Toys?"

ushabti

ushabti
Egyptian Tomb Doll 18th Dynasty

Ann Parker Doll of Anne Boleyn

Ann Parker Doll of Anne Boleyn

Popular Posts

Tin Head Brother and Sister, a Recent Purchase

Tin Head Brother and Sister, a Recent Purchase
Courtesy, Antique Daughter

Judge Peep

Judge Peep

Hakata Doll Artist at Work

Hakata Doll Artist at Work
From the Museum Collection

Follow by Email

Japanese Costume Barbies

Japanese Costume Barbies
Samurai Ken

Etienne

Etienne
A Little Girl

Happy Heart Day

Happy Heart Day

From "Dolls"

From "Dolls"
A Favorite Doll Book

Popular Posts

Jenny Wren

Jenny Wren
Ultimate Doll Restorer

Our Friends at The Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum

Our Friends at The Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum

Baby Boo 1960s

Baby Boo 1960s
Reclaimed and Restored as a childhood Sabrina the Witch with Meow Meow

Dr. E's on Display with sign

Dr. E's on Display with sign

Dolls Restored ad New to the Museum

Dolls Restored ad New to the Museum
L to R: K*R /celluloid head, all bisque Artist Googly, 14 in. vinyl inuit sixties, early celluloid Skookum type.

Two More Rescued Dolls

Two More Rescued Dolls
Late Sixties Vinyl: L to R: Probably Horseman, all vinyl, jointed. New wig. R: Effanbee, probably Muffy, mid sixties. New wig and new clothing on both. About 12 inches high.

Restored Italian Baby Doll

Restored Italian Baby Doll
One of Dr. E's Rescued Residents

Dolls on Display

Dolls on Display
L to R: Nutcrackers, Danish Troll, HItty and her book, Patent Washable, Mechanical Minstrel, Creche figure, M. Alexander Swiss. Center is a German mechanical bear on the piano. Background is a bisque German costume doll.

A Few Friends

A Few Friends
These dolls are Old German and Nutcrackers from Dr. E's Museum. They are on loan to another local museum for the holidays.

Vintage Collage

Vintage Collage
Public Domain Art

The Merry Wanderer

The Merry Wanderer
Courtesy R. John Wright, The Hummel Collection

The Fennimore Doll Museum

The Fennimore Doll Museum

Robert

Robert
A Haunted Doll with a Story

Halloween Dolls Displayed in a Local Library

Halloween Dolls Displayed in a Local Library

The Cody Jumeau

The Cody Jumeau
Long-faced or Jumeau Triste

German Princesses

German Princesses
GAHC 2005

A Little PowerRanger

A Little PowerRanger
Halloween 2004

The Island of the Dolls

The Island of the Dolls
Shrine to Dolls in Mexico

Based on the Nutshell Series of Death

Based on the Nutshell Series of Death
Doll House murder

Popular Posts

Total Pageviews

A lovely dress

A lovely dress

Raggedy Ann

Raggedy Ann
A few friends in cloth!

Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum, WI

Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum, WI
Pixar Animator's Collection

Little PM sisters

Little PM sisters
Recent eBay finds

Dressed Mexican Fleas

Dressed Mexican Fleas

Really old Dolls!

Really old Dolls!

Wednesday, May 30, 2012

Ancient Greek Games

http://www.mlahanas.de/Greeks/ModernSport.htm Ancient games and past times in Ancient Greece.

Kewpies

Collectors' Concerns; KOVELS
Kewpie Dolls
Q: My daughter found these adorable Kewpie dolls at a church rummage sale about eight years ago and gave them to me. I put them in a glass-front shadowbox to keep them out of harm's way. They are made as one piece with their arms around each other. Their crepe-paper clothes are showing wear, but they don't seem to mind. Can you give me some information about their age, origin, and value? I would never part with them, but would like to have some "bragging rights" for those who don't appreciate them! A: Kewpies were "invented" by Rose O'Neill (1874-1944), an author, illustrator, poet, and suffragette. They were first pictured in the December 1909 issue of Ladies' Home Journal. The Kewpies were cupid-like characters that did good deeds. O'Neill said "Cupid gets you into trouble and the Kewpies get you out." A patent for Kewpie dolls was registered in 1913 and the first Kewpie dolls were made in Germany. Bisque, porcelain, and celluloid dolls were manufactured in several different sizes. Since then the dolls have been made of many different materials, with clothing and without, by makers in several countries and they are still being made. Your Kewpies are wedding-cake toppers. Their crepe-paper clothes suggest they date from the 1920s. The pair would sell for about $150 to $200. Buyers often want them to use at a wedding.

Thursday, May 24, 2012

My Life in Antiques

When I have a little time, I sit and muse. I go through old albums and notes to get ideas, especially on days like today when I know I have to up late, and work till 10 pm. I thought of all the antique stores I've been to, the flea markets, the malls, the antique shows, the exclusive yard sale here and there, and I'm overwhelmed by how much I learned, and of the wonderful dealers and owners who were willing to pause and teach a little girl with her mother about the different types of dolls available. There were ladies in Disneyland and Knotts Berry Farm, Mr. Mott himself of Mott's miniatures, Vera Kramer and her husband, who over the years, took the time to tell me about doll artists, premium foreign dolls like Peggy Nisbet and Charlotte Weibull, how to spot a repair or reproduction [Jim Fernando], how to put an antique doll head under Ultraviolet light or X-ray to determine if it had cracks [Michael Canadas] how to make doll dresses witout patterns [also Michael, once a theater major]; so many others whose names I can' remember, since I was six years old. When I was 8 and we wnt to see Mrs. Wellman's doll collection, my brownie leader told her I was a collector who already had a lot of good dolls, Mrs. Wellman took me up front and center and treated me as a colleague, even as she handed me penny dolls and explained their origins. Miss Bolin often showed us her dolls at school, and let me come up close to see them. I was promised some fo er dolls one time, but they have all disappaeared. There were dealers who stopped to explain to me the differences among Native American peoples and their doll-making techniques. Others told me the stories of the costumes and materials used. Some would show me their own old dolls, treasures for generations, even if we couldn't buy anything. Some kept their shops open when we pulled in near closing time. A few gave me little dolls, including a tiny peanut cowboy from a great store in Rock Springs, WY. My dear friend Violet taught me to make them and sew antique doll bodies. Some were only intrested in selling their junk; they would divert me from the antiques and show me their "cheap" dolls. I think in their own way, they didn't want to disappoint a little girl who had come so far, but few people were rude. Once once or twice was someone nasty with us, or tried to buy something out from under me, and these were people I knew. We didn't argue, just didn't go to those shops again. Well, we all have our days. As one of my dealer friends keeps saying, I grew up with them. My dad seldom went in, and he is known universally as "The Man in the Car." Dad is responsible for carrying two nearly lifesized dolls on the plane from Rome, and he bought the porclelain Suzanne Gibson and the Lady Anne Mary Todd Lincocln. He also carried dolls home from South Africa and Japan, especially when a business colleauge found out out my doll collection; they were eager to add to it then. So, mine is a life defined by old things, by antique dolls. I saw my first German bisque dolls in Fantasyland in Gettysburg, and I was about 5. I was hooked. My first "old doll" was a bisque Nancy Ann from my babysitter Mrs. Gianakes. My first antique was a Frozen Charlotte from the Women's Club antique show, at our Masonic Temple, now a fantastic banquet center and haunted house [with haunted doll room and animatrons!]. My first china heads were 40s Xmas angels and a handmade china head from my Aunt Rose. Mom bought me the second; a fanstastic Repro, that looks autentic even now, from Disneyland. Mom sewed them a wardrobe. I'll never part with my China Head Twins. My first old compo was Arranbee's Littlest Angel, and an old Mexican china poblana from Albuquerque. My first German bisque a small A and M dressed as a dutch boy, but she soon became "Melinda." My first antique china head was 5" and named Miss Charlotte. She as a cloth body and hands, and is from another old local antique show, no longer held. So, this is a syopsis of my life in antiques. When I'm "dolling," I m not sick don't feel stressed, and feel my mom walking beside me once again.

Wednesday, May 23, 2012

The Woman in Black and Dolls

I finally got my copy of this long awaited DVD. Since I read Hill's novel, I have thought of few other films, only Dark Shadows, which I saw Sunday. The book was chilling, more so because it is deceptively short and illustrated as though it were childrens literature. It isn't.
The film was dark and decrepit, but more sad than scary. You have to feel the mother's grief; Jennet turns to bitterness and vengeance, and that is her sin. Even reuniting her with her child does not satisfy her. But, the plot is changed significantly in the film, with more characters, lost children, and plots. Eel March House is horribly inhospitable; no one in his/her right mind would stay there alone in the day, let alone at night.
TWIB is more banshee than ghost; she is more like a bad camera trick than anything else. The opening scene of the three little girls moving from a dolls' teaparty to jumping from their attic bedroom window is the most frightening scene of the film. It does not exist in the book, which opens at Christmas with Arthur's second family.
The dolls are creepy, and there are many of them. Besides the bluebird toy china, the three little girls have a rag doll, a penny wooden in a bed, a couple china heads that look old, and an anachronistic seventies porcelain doll, the kind made in taiwan or china. In the nursery in Eel Marsh House, there are real automatons with Jumeau heads, mechanical monkeys and tin clowns, perhaps a doll house [the cinematography is too dark to tell], and lots of Victorian cards, a toy boat, a mechanical rabbit and cat. There is another acrobatic clown and most play music. One mistake, in a letter not part of the novel, Jennet, in the film, is addressed as "Ms. Jennet Humphrey." Ms. was not used till the mid 1970s. It was not used, nor did it exist in 1889. I enjoyed the film, but it was very, very sad and depressing. The horror is in the mother's loss, and the fact that nothing can stop her grief, which destroys everyone.

Paper Dolls

How to Collect Paper Dolls from eHow.com How to Start a Paper Doll Collection X eHow Hobbies, Games & Toys Editor This article was created by a professional writer and edited by experienced copy editors, both qualified members of the Demand Media Studios community. All articles go through an editorial process that includes subject matter guidelines, plagiarism review, fact-checking, and other steps in an effort to provide reliable information. By an eHow Contributor Hobbies that involve collecting items are challenging at times, but the joy of finding that special piece is worth it. Paper doll collecting is a hobby for children or adults. Children gain quality time spent with a grown-up as they look for the doll of their dreams, while adults get the chance to be a child again and reflect on childhood memories. Other People Are Reading How to Make a 3D Paper Doll How to Buy Paper Dolls Print this articleInstructions 1 Educate yourself and learn what paper doll collecting is all about. Go to a large library and review periodicals, books and collector magazines for ideas and information. Learn the famous names collectors look for, such as Merril, Lowe and Samual Gabriel and Sons. 2 Determine if your collection will include a specific genre. Some ideas include celebrities such as Eva Gardner, royalty like Princess Diana, fashion icons like Barbie, or 50s, 60s and 70s dolls. Sponsored Links Apply For Student Grants Apply For Federal Student Grants. You May Qualify For Financial Aid! Student-Grants.CourseAdvisor.com3 Decide on a budget for yourself if necessary. Sometimes collecting can become more than a hobby and turn into an obsession. Set limits to spending and be reasonable. Then search out a great deal. 4 Enjoy looking at the various paper dolls while choosing which form you'll be purchasing them in. Some collectors will buy old paper dolls in book or magazine form. Others will purchase the sticker and magnetic types. 5 Think about whether you'll buy cut or uncut versions. Some collectors refuse to buy a cut paper doll and will only purchase it if the doll is in mint condition and still in the magazine. Read up on what makes a doll valuable if resale is an option to come. 6 Make your clothing. Starting a paper doll collection is fun but it can be even more personal. If your choice in clothing is different from the traditional style worn in the era you're collecting, make your own clothing from crepe paper, embroidery thread and paper patterns. 7 Buy from special artists. Specific artists make one-of-a-kind paper dolls. Rachel Taft Dixon and Clara Emst Barnes are two famous names to look for. They both make spectacular designs including paper dolls from the classic story of Little Women. Sponsored Links Illinois Debt ForgivenessGetDebtAid.com/Live-in-Illinois? Illinois Residents may now Qualify for Debt Forgiveness. Check Status. Apply For Pell GrantsPell-Grants.EducationGrant.com Apply For Federal Pell Grants Now. You May Qualify For Financial Aid! Chico's® - Official Sitewww.Chicos.com Shop Chico's Apparel for Chic Jackets, Tops, Dresses & More. Local Collectible ShopsLocal.com Search For Collectors Shops By Location At Local.com! Related Searches: Paper Doll Cutouts Paper Doll Doll Dress Up Games Barbie Doll Dress Up Games Doll Games for Girls Read more: How to Start a Paper Doll Collection | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_2124575_start-paper-doll-collection.html#ixzz1viwZZ7mW

Doll Museum: Followers, Folk Dolls, and other Good Things

Doll Museum: Followers, Folk Dolls, and other Good Things: I would like to welcome my new followers. I will continue my histories with a discussion of older books about dolls and doll collectors,...

Monday, May 21, 2012

Tidbits

It says free to share, but the host is not generous to us Yanks:

W R I T I N G W O R L D A World of Writing Information - For Writers Around the World http://www.writing-world.com Issue 12:10 13,183 subscribers May 17, 2012 ***************************************************************** MANAGE YOUR SUBSCRIPTION: See the bottom of this newsletter for details on how to subscribe, unsubscribe, or contact the editors. ***************************************************************** IN THIS ISSUE: ================================================================= THE EDITOR'S DESK: Whether to Be Rich, Enriched, or Enriching... by Moira Allen THE WRITER'S DESK: Resale Rights, by Moira Allen NEWS FROM THE WORLD OF WRITING WRITING JOBS AND OPPORTUNITIES FEATURE: 7 Reasons Why Writers Should Blog, by Jennifer Brown Banks THE WRITE SITES -- Online Resources for Writers WRITING CONTESTS WITH NO ENTRY FEES The Author's Bookshelf **************************************************************** WRITERSCOLLEGE.COM has 57 online courses. Prices are low. If you can reach our web site, you can take our courses. http://www.WritersCollege.com ***************************************************************** WRITE FOR CHILDREN. Achieve your dream of becoming a published author. Writing books and stories for children is a great place to start. Learn the secrets 1-on-1 from a pro writer. Train online or by mail. Free Test offered. http://www.writingforchildren.com/H2676 ***************************************************************** THOUSANDS OF WRITERS USE FANSTORY.COM FOR: * Feedback. Get feedback for every poem and story that you write. * Contests. Over 40 contests are always open and free to enter. * Rankings. Statistics will show you how your writing is doing. http://www.fanstory.com/index1.jsp?at=38 ***************************************************************** DON'T GET SCAMMED! Choose the right Self Publishing Company for your book. What you need to know before choosing a self publishing company and the questions you should ask. http://dogearpublishing.net/self-publishing-companies.aspx ***************************************************************** EARN TOP DOLLAR WITH SKILLS YOU ALREADY HAVE... And Finish Your Novel, Too! What if this year you could honestly call yourself an author because you could support yourself and your family? Details Here: http://www.awaionline.com/go/index.php?ad=592721 ***************************************************************** FROM THE EDITOR'S DESK ================================================================= Whether to Be Rich, Enriched, or Enriching... --------------------------------------------- I've just finished one of those "how to get rich" books, and it seems to have brought out my inner curmudgeon. The book was "Rich Dad, Poor Dad," by Robert Kiyosaki -- and if wealth is your goal, I honestly can't say that I recommend it. It did make one point I agree with, however: That the U.S. educational system (and, I assume, the educational systems of most of the rest of the world) do not prepare people for independent thinking, but rather, trains folks to be employees whose primary purpose is to build wealth for OTHER people. Kiyosaki describes this, appropriately, as "the rat race" -- and it's certainly the rat race that many of us became freelance writers to avoid. What kept me grumbling throughout the book, however, was the persistent emphasis on a single goal: Making more money. To Kiyosaki, it would seem, building wealth is all -- wealth for himself, wealth to pass on to his children. And by "wealth" he means, simply, money. As a writer, I can't help but think that this is a limited, and rather sad, perspective on life. "Wealth" is a word that has been used, historically, to mean far more than the amassment of material riches. Can we be wealthy, without being rich? I suspect that if the majority of folks who consider themselves "writers" chose this profession, or avocation, with the sole purpose of amassing material wealth, the readership of this newsletter would be down to about two. Not that there aren't plenty of us seeking to earn a living through our words. But most of us, I think, didn't choose writing as a tool to make loads MORE money than, say, data entry or real estate. Most of us chose it because we found a wealth in words that outweighs the wealth of a steady paycheck. I suspect that most of us became writers because we recognized how, throughout our lives, we have been enriched by words. We were the oddballs in school who actually LIKED books. We looked forward to reading; in fact, our parents and teachers probably despaired of ever getting us to STOP reading. "Put down that book and go outdoors and play!" we were told. (How many of us "complied" by smuggling a book outdoors with us?) Our peers regarded us as nerds, brainiacs, social outcasts -- but we'd already discovered a world so far beyond that which our peers valued that we didn't care (much). Books became our friends, our doorways to worlds real and imagined, our inspiration. They made us rich in spirit. Gradually, as we began to spin our own words, we realized that what we had received, we could also give. Through our words, we could influence, inspire, and inform. Through articles, stories, poetry and books, we could enter do for others what generations of authors, past and present, had done for us. WE could enrich the world with OUR words, just as our own worlds had been enriched by the words of others. Does it matter, in the long run? Let's try a little test. First -- quickly, now! -- rattle off the names of, say, ten or twelve of the richest men of the 19th century. No peeking at Wikipedia! OK, we have Rockefeller, DuPont, Astor, Schwab, Morgan, um... hang on... There were lots more, surely! (And I'm sure you probably came up with a longer list, or a different list, from mine.) Now... Quickly, again, rattle off the names of, say, a dozen great AUTHORS of the 19th (or even 18th) century. Again, no peeking at Wikipedia. Was it difficult to hit a dozen? Did you want to just keep on going? Did names come thick and fast? Twain, Dickens, Austen, Irving, Pushkin, Doyle, Harte, Bronte (plural), Sand, Eliot, Thackeray, Hugo, Baum, Carroll... Doesn't the list just go on and on? Again, you probably came up with a different list, a longer list... and that's precisely the point! Another interesting point: Money can only be measured in terms of money. One speaks of the "richest" men, not the "best" rich men or the "greatest" rich men. But when one speaks of authors, one speaks of the best, the greatest, the most inspiring, the most inspired. And here's yet another point: Money is measured in terms of quantity, i.e., who has the most? But greatness can be attained without extinguishing someone else's lamp. The greatness of Jane Austen doesn't diminish the greatness of Charles Dickens, or of Mark Twain, or of Arthur Conan Doyle. Likewise, it won't diminish yours, any more than yours will diminish theirs. Ironically, in the introduction to his book, Kiyosaki DOES list some of the richest men of America in the early 1920's, and then points out that by the end of the Depression, most of them were dead, many having committed suicide. (Another bit of irony is quite a number of the 19th century's richest men, and at least one famous author*, died on the Titanic...) It's a good illustration of the hard truth that if material wealth is all, then losing it truly means losing all. I'm certainly not saying that we, as writers, should not strive toward material gain. I'm not one of those who believes that to be paid for our words is, somehow, to have "prostituted" our art. I've always regarded that attitude as the excuse of someone who has no real interest in enriching others but prefers to say, "My work is so brilliantly obscure no one can appreciate it but me." On the contrary, I believe "the laborer is worth of his [and her] hire." There's absolutely nothing wrong with being materially enriched by a skill that brings so much into the lives of others. What I'm suggesting, and I suspect I'm preaching to the choir, is that while we are happy to earn the coin, we're in this for a great deal more. Those who are simply "rich" may make a splash in the here-and-now, but are quickly forgotten in the pages of history. Those who ENRICH are remembered, often for centuries -- even if they lived as paupers. And these are tough times for many authors, times when assignments and paychecks can be few and far between. Yet it's exactly at such times that we need to remember why we started down this road in the first place: Because we were far more interested in sharing the wealth of the rainbow than in hoarding the pot of gold. Every time you write something that helps someone learn, grow, heal, change, or simply smile, you've made someone's life richer. There's money and there's wealth -- and as a writer, you're storing up treasure that moth and rust cannot destroy. *Jacques Futrelle, if anyone is wondering. -- Moira Allen, Editor Copyright 2012 Moira Allen ***************************************************************** THESE TWO FREE ISSUES ARE YOURS TO KEEP Read by over 1,000 children's book and magazine editors, this monthly newsletter can be your own personal source of editors' wants and needs, market tips, and professional insights. Get 2 FREE issues to start. http://www.thechildrenswriter.com/AY347 ***************************************************************** The Writing Desk: Resale Rights ================================================================= By Moira Allen Can I resell stories I previously sold with no contract? -------------------------------------------------------- Q: I wrote a continuing series of stories for a magazine, which they published and paid me for. I never was given or signed any contract, nor was anything mentioned about who owned the rights. Now I would like to sell the story series as a book. Is this permissible? Legal? Can the original publisher sue me? Should I ask their permission? A: Without a written contract to establish a publication's ownership of rights, rights are assumed to rest with the author. A publication cannot claim or assume to claim all rights, or some specific bundle of "extra" rights (such as anthology rights or electronic rights, which would be implied by the use you describe) without some form of prior agreement with the author. Nor can such an agreement be established after the fact -- i.e., after you've already sold the articles. A contract must precede a sale, as it is considered the agreement upon which a sale is based. Since you were not an employee of the magazine, they cannot claim that the material was "work for hire." Even if they have a policy statement listed somewhere (e.g., in their writers' guidelines) that claim particular rights, this is not necessarily legally binding (though at that point the magazine could claim that you "knew" of this policy before submitting material). In this case, you should not need to ask permission, as you hold the copyright to your articles. When no rights transfer is specified, you are assumed to have sold "first" or "one-time" rights, which leaves you the right to resell the material later. Out of courtesy, you may wish to note in your collection that these articles originally appeared in X magazine, but you don't need permission. If you feel uncomfortable about the magazine management's reaction, you may wish to let them know what you are doing, but not in such a way that could be construed as "asking permission." As for "could they sue?" -- Well, yes, anyone can sue if they want to, whether there is a legal basis or not. It would be unlikely, however. More probably, if they are really hardnosed, they might send you a letter from their lawyer saying that you shouldn't do this -- and the best response is to simply hire a lawyer for the purpose of answering that letter legally, spelling out your rights etc. But it is unlikely to come to that. The key to remember is that if you don't transfer rights in writing, you own them. Can I resell the original version of an article that was changed by the editor, even though I sold all rights? ------------------------------------------------------------------- Q: I recently wrote a piece for another magazine and sold all rights. The piece underwent drastic editing and the story that was published under my byline bore little resemblance to my original work. Can I legally sell the piece I wrote originally, since it's nothing like the piece they ran? In general, how much revision is necessary if you're reselling an idea that you've already written about? For example, can you use the same sources with different quotes? A: Yes, you can use the same sources; you can even use the same quotes. Basically, the idea is that the piece "looks" different enough that one would think it is not the same article. Just cutting often isn't enough; sometimes it's best to at least put a somewhat different slant on the piece. There's a difference here between "all rights" and "work for hire." All rights simply means that you have relinquished the rights to that piece, as it was written. However, you still retain the copyright itself. When you sell a work-for-hire piece, you are relinquishing your copyright as well -- and so you're in a little more danger if you try to write a similar piece. If you write a piece that is similar to one you sold for "all rights," the only copyright you might be infringing is your own -- i.e., even if you just went through and revised the article line-by-line, you'd only be infringing yourself. But if you did the same thing with a work-for-hire piece, you could be liable for infringing the copyright of the company that you sold the material to, because even though you wrote it, they own not just the article but the copyright as well. The issue of "how different is different enough" is very difficult to resolve. Again, essentially, it's "would you think this is a different article, on the same subject?" Or would the reader feel that he has read it somewhere else, with just a little different wording? (For more thoughts on the "how different is different enough" question, see my editorial of April 5, 2012 - "The 20% Solution," at http://www.writing-world.com/coffee/coffee40.shtml) Copyright 2012 Moira Allen *************************************************************** AUTHOR SITES FOR LESS gives authors a virtual home without breaking the bank. Choose from a variety of author-specific, classy, and tailor-made templates starting at $399. We offer a choice of three plans. Our set-up enables you to update your site without needing a developer. Social media pages also available. Please visit http://www.authorsitesforless.com ***************************************************************** NEWS FROM THE WORLD OF WRITING ================================================================= Are Writers About To Become Obsolete? ------------------------------------- This is an interesting but also scary news item from Wired magazine concerning a computer algorithm that is already being used to generate news stories. For more on this story, visit: http://tinyurl.com/7txfscv British Book Seller Against Libraries Lending eBooks ---------------------------------------------------- This follows on in a very scary way from last issue's editorial by Moira. Apparently the Managing Director of Waterstones, a large chain of book stores in the UK, thinks that eBooks should not be lent by libraries as this will damage the book-selling industry. For more on this story visit: http://tinyurl.com/7hrpz3l Simon & Schuster Brings Back Pocket Star Books ---------------------------------------------- Pocket Books was America's first mass paperback publisher and now Simon & Schuster have brought back the imprint Pocket Star, but this time as an eBook-only imprint. Pocket Star will continue to feature bestselling and debut authors in popular genres including women's fiction, romance, thrillers, urban fantasy, and mystery. For more on this story visit: http://tinyurl.com/czgh6d4 ***************************************************************** EVERYHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SETTING FREELANCE FEES! Find out how to negotiate agreements, choose pricing strategies, define tasks, deal with difficult customers, and much more in the award- winning "What to Charge: Pricing Strategies for Freelancers and Consultants" (2nd Edition) by Laurie Lewis. In print and Kindle from Amazon at http://tinyurl.com/setyourfees ***************************************************************** Writing Jobs and Opportunities ================================================================= Reporter, Staff Writer and Bloggers Needed at CMN.com ----------------------------------------------------- The Consumer Media Networks is currently seeking an experienced freelancer for the role of full-time reporter, another for the role of staff writer and also bloggers for the categories of education, home improvement, insurance and car maintenance. To find out further information about these positions and to apply visit: http://www.cmn.com/careers/ YA Science Fiction Wanted ------------------------- Underwords is now accepting submissions for our next project, Futuredaze: An Anthology of YA Science Fiction, a science fiction anthology for teens, young adults, and the young at heart. We're looking for fiction and poetry that sparks the imagination, twists the heart, and makes us yearn for the possibilities of a world yet to come. At a time when every other YA book features vampires, werewolves or other fantastical creatures, Futuredaze will be an anthology for the next generation of science fiction readers. We're looking for hard science fiction, soft science fiction, and everything in between. Think Jules Verne, Isaac Asimov, George Orwell or Ray Bradbury with a YA focus. While we adore fantasy, Futuredaze is not the right anthology for fiction or poetry based in worlds where magic or the supernatural are the driving forces. For more information visit: http://tinyurl.com/cbuoslo ************************************************************** A FREE MASTER CLASS IN CREATIVE WRITING SUCCESS. Enroll FREE in a 14-part 'mini course' in short-story writing success. This highly acclaimed Writers' Village 'Master Class' shows you how to get published - profitably - and win cash prizes in fiction contests. Discover how to open a chapter with 'wow' impact, add new energy to a scene, build a character in moments, sustain page-turning suspense even through long passages of exposition... plus 97 additional powerful ideas you can use at once. Enjoy the course without charge now at: http://www.writers-village.org/writing-success **************************************************************** AFFORDABLE NATIONAL PUBLICITY FOR AUTHORS Need interviews or your book reviewed by national media, but horrified by expensive publicists? Read our important letter at http://www.1waypr.com/WriterAuthor-B3.html ***************************************************************** FEATURE: 7 Reasons Today's Writers Should Blog to Build Their Platforms and Their Bottom Lines! =============================================================== By Jennifer Brown Banks Once upon a time in a far-away land, writers who were skilled with penning their thoughts and crafting clever story ideas could write their own tickets. Being "good" was simply good enough. 'Dem days are gone. Fast forward. A tough economy and the relative ease of making money online has changed the game. The talent pool is larger. The bar is higher. The industry has changed. I was faced with this sobering reality back in 2006, when an editor with whom I had worked for quite some time as a columnist suggested that I write a self-help relationship book. So I eagerly put together a few chapters, mailed it off, and envisioned my guest appearance on Oprah. Much to my surprise, when I submitted it to a New York agent for potential representation, she wrote back, "You have obvious talent as a writer, but not a big enough platform." Ouch. Back in my day "platforms" were sexy shoes that added height to our stature and jiggle to our strut. Hello? I had been writing for over a decade, had made thousands of dollars, and had no real concept of why I needed a platform and how to get one. Enter blogging... Before I share with you WHY blogging is important to building a platform, let's define platform as it relates to the publishing world. A "platform" refers to an author's following and fan base. Ideally it should include more than your mom and members at church. Publishers and agents use it as a basis for determining your reach, and for potential book sales. For example, it could include people who are members of your writers' groups, your college sorority, folks on your job, subscribers to your newsletter, or blog followers. Here's how Blogging can help to elevate your platform and your bottom line! 1. It increases your visibility. Websites are static; blogs are not. Their very nature and constant updates means that Google will pick your blog up through "crawlers" and reflect them higher up in search engine listings. The easier you are to find, the more potential eyes to view your work. Additionally, blog posts are often Tweeted and shared through popular social media sites. Here's a case in point. I have been writing professionally for more than a decade. Comparatively, I have been blogging "seriously" for a little under three years. Google lists my blog posts first, above all my former publishing credits. 2. It helps to hone your voice. Unlike other genres of writing, blogging has few rules and restrictions. As such, writers can speak in a conversational tone, court controversy, experiment with different forms of expression, try their hand at humor, and discover what works best for their style, preference and personality. Blogging also allows you to address a multitude of topics, which can build your portfolio and your knowledge base. 3. It makes you more versatile as a writer. Search any of the current job boards for writers, and blog jobs are abundant. Regardless of your genre of specialization, having blogging skills simply makes you more marketable to editors, potential clients, and publishers. (Think along the lines of the value of speaking multiple languages.) Since my career in blogging started, I have blogged for businesses, dating sites, and online magazines. And you can too. 4. It creates more networking opportunities through guest posting. Guest posting is when a blogger writes a piece for another blog site, upon approval. Oftentimes this fosters working partnerships, mutual admiration, and future collaborative projects with fellow bloggers. It promotes good karma to boot. 5. It requires less research and typically takes less time than other genres. As they say, "Time is money." Usually blog posts run from 300-800 words, which means that good writers can construct posts relatively quickly, and work on more projects in a shorter span of time, increasing overall efficiency. Consider too that it can help to prevent burnout. 6. It can be more profitable than article-writing. Experience can vary. But depending upon the client, the nature of the project, and your blogging skills, pay can be around a hundred bucks for a 500-700 word post. 7. Blogging helps to develop a "thick skin". If you have difficulty with dealing with editors' rejections, blogging can help you to handle criticism and feedback better in your professional career. The interactive nature of blogging allows readers to express their views right on the spot, in the form of comments. Sometimes audience members can be like "hecklers" are with comedians. Comments can be cruel and unfair. But, it comes with the territory, and calls for the savvy blogger to "take the high road" and not personalize things. Here are a few Do's and Don'ts to go the distance: 1. Recognize that success as a writer today requires more than facility with words; it's about being strategic and smart. As such, do consider the many benefits blogging has to offer, and strive to add value to the blogging community. 2. Don't mistakenly believe that because blogging is considered informal writing, you should take a less than serious approach, or that your writing can be inferior in quality. Blogging can make or break your online image. 3. Study the habits and techniques of successful bloggers in your niche. What's their appeal? Their style? Their advice? Assess then apply. 4. Don't be discouraged if your blogging doesn't take off right away. It took me three attempts and several years before I got it right. "If at first you don't succeed..." 5. Newbies will find blogging platforms like Blogger.com and Wordpress to be easy to follow, with attractive designs and templates. Tutorials can be found online to master the learning curve. Blogging has become the new black. Even real estate tycoon, Donald Trump has his own "virtual spot." Don't miss out on the opportunity to make the most of your writing career. Blog your way to a bigger platform and bigger paydays with these timely tips. >>--------------------------------------------------<< Jennifer Brown Banks is a veteran freelance writer, Pro blogger, and relationship columnist. Her guest posts and articles have appeared at award-winning sites such as: Pro Blogger, Daily Blog Tips, Technorati, Funds for Writers, and Men With Pens. She is also a Ghost Writer, providing web content and blog posts for busy professionals. Visit her site at Penandprosper.blogspot.com/ Copyright 2012 Jennifer Brown Banks For more advice on blogging check out: http://www.writing-world.com/freelance/blogs.shtml **************************************************************** EBOOK SELF-PUBLISHING EXPLAINED An epublishing revolution is sweeping the industry. We explain what is happening and show you how to self-publish your own eBooks. http://www.PublishYourOwnEbooks.com ***************************************************************** SERIOUS ABOUT WRITING? Join the National Association of Independent Writers and Editors, the professional association with a career-building difference. We partner with you to create a strategic online presence with genuine credibility. You get a free NAIWE-linked website (and more) so you'll be where people come to find writers. Join us today at http://naiwe.com! ***************************************************************** THE WRITE SITES ================================================================= All the World's our Page ------------------------ This is a fascinating blog on novel-writing written by five different authors from very different genres and from different parts of the world. This site is packed full of some useful advice and is well worth a visit. http://alltheworldsourpage.blogspot.co.uk/ Write Crime Fiction ------------------- This is a very useful blog on crime-writing and crime fiction by David J Montgomery, which features interviews with crime writers as well as general writing tips. http://www.crimefictionblog.com/ Andy Maslen Copywriting Training -------------------------------- If you're new to the world of copywriting, or just want to improve your skills, check out this amazing resource rich site for copywriters. http://www.sunfish.co.uk/index.html ***************************************************************** IT'S HERE! COMPLETELY UPDATED AND EXPANDED FOR 2012, Moira Allen's "Writing to Win: The Colossal Guide to Writing Contests" is now available. This is the largest, most comprehensive guide to writing competitions available in print (and Kindle). The 2012 edition features over 1600 contest listings for writers worldwide - including over 450 listings new to this edition. No matter where you live or what you write, you'll find a competition that's right for you! The guide is updated with the latest deadlines, entry fees and prizes. Get it now at https://www.createspace.com/3778183 or visit Amazon.com to order the Kindle edition. NOTE TO KINDLE USERS: I just got my Kindle Fire and found that there seemed to be format issues with the Kindle version of "Writing to Win" that appeared only on the Fire. I have just reformatted the book; if you have already purchased it, the revised version should upload automatically in the next few days. ***************************************************************** WRITING CONTESTS ================================================================= This section lists contests that charge no entry fees. Unless otherwise indicated, competitions are open to all adult writers. For a guide to nearly 1600 writing contests throughout the world, see Moira Allen's book, "Writing to Win: The Colossal Guide to Writing Contests" (http://www.writing-world.com/bookstore/index.shtml). RICHARD J. MARGOLIS AWARD ------------------------ DEADLINE: July 1, 2012 GENRE: Nonfiction DETAILS: This contest offers stipend and one-month residency at Blue Mountain Center in the Adirondacks for a promising new journalist or essayist whose work combines warmth, humor, wisdom and concern with social justice. Submit at least two articles PRIZES: $5000 stipend URL: http://award.margolis.com/ PETER BLAZEY FELLOWSHIP ----------------------- DEADLINE: July 2, 2012 GENRE: Nonfiction OPEN TO: Australian writers with a nonfiction work-in-progress. DETAILS: Submit CV, publishing credits and at least 5000 words of the work in progress. PRIZES: Aus $15,000 and one-month residency at the Australian Centre. The residency includes access to office space and facilities, but does not include accommodation. URL: http://tinyurl.com/82qoykp MCLAUGHLIN-ESSTMAN-STEARNS FIRST NOVEL PRIZE -------------------------------------------- DEADLINE: July 15, 2012 GENRE: Books OPEN TO: US novelists who have had their first novel published in the previous 12 months. DETAILS: Submit three copies of the book PRIZE: $500 URL: http://www.writer.org/page.aspx?pid=927 JERWOOD ALDEBURGH FIRST COLLECTION PRIZE ---------------------------------------- DEADLINE: July 23, 2012 GENRE: Poetry OPEN TO: Poets whose work has been published in Great Britain or Ireland in the previous calendar year. DETAILS: Submit published poetry book of at least 40 pages in length. PRIZE: £1000 URL: http://www.thepoetrytrust.org/jerwood-first-collection-prize/ LITRO & IGGY INTERNATIONAL YOUNG PERSONS SHORT STORY AWARD ---------------------------------------------------------- DEADLINE: July 24, 2012 GENRE: Short Stories OPEN To: Children aged between 11 and 19 years. DETAILS: 3000 word max short story on an international theme. PRIZES: £2,500 and publication URL: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/study/iggy/news/litro_iggy_international/ LANDFALL ESSAY COMPETITION -------------------------- DEADLINE: July 31, 2012 GENRE: Non Fiction OPEN TO: New Zealand citizens and permanent residents. DETAILS: One essay, maximum 6,000 words on any theme. PRIZES: NZ$3,000 URL: http://www.otago.ac.nz/press/landfall/essaycompetition.html ***************************************************************** AUTHOR'S BOOKSHELF: Books by Our Readers ================================================================= A Boy Loves a Man 1: Gypsy Heir to the Throne, by Aad Aandacht Chalk Dustings, by Gloria MacKay Creating Blockbusters! How to Generate and Market Hit Entertainment for TV, Movies, Video Games, and Books, by Gene Del Vecchio I Have Proof of a Higher Power, by Ioan Dirina Find these and more great books at http://www.writing-world.com/books/index.shtml Have you just had a book published? If so, let our readers know: just click on the link below to list your book. http://www.writing-world.com/books/listyours.shtml ***************************************************************** ADVERTISE in WRITING WORLD or on WRITING-WORLD.COM! For details on how to reach more than 100,000 writers a month with your product, service or book title, visit http://www.writing-world.com/admin1/adrates.shtml ***************************************************************** Writing World is a publication of Writing-World.com http://www.writing-world.com Editor and Publisher: MOIRA ALLEN (editors@writing-world.com) Newsletter Editor: DAWN COPEMAN (editorial@writing-world.com) Copyright 2012 Moira Allen Sutton House, Meads Road, Eastbourne, East Sussex To unsubscribe or change subscriber options visit: http://www.aweber.com/z/r/?LEyszKyMtCwcrMxs7GwMtEa0jCwsDEycjMw= Actions Flag Clear flag Create a Filter Print Message Show Message Status View Message Source --------- Move to: Old Mail Sent IMs Spam Recently Deleted Saved Mail Go to the previous message control+alt+pagedown Go to the next message control+alt+pageup Close message escape © 2012 AOL Inc. All Rights Reserved Standard VersionTerms of ServicePrivacy PolicyAbout Our AdsContext Sensitive Shortcuts etsag1998@aol.com

Sunday, May 20, 2012

Wednesday, May 16, 2012

Of Auctions and Other Pleasures

Now and then I like to share my emails and newsletters of doll and antique auctions. Theriault's is very good about sending these. I have some of their catalogs, and bought several interesting things from Doll Masters; wish they would send it again! I've not won dolls there, but years ago used to correspond with Florence T on the old AOL Hobby Central, where P. Smith also snubbed me, and Eleanor St. George in one fell Swoop! I met my friends at JnJ Dolls there, too, and I miss Hobby Central and The Book Report very muc. I've had great luck at Frashers, where Barbara remembers my name every time, McMasters, Tom Harris Auctions, and Noel Barret. He also remembers people, and will answer the phone himself to talk to youl That's customer service. I like getting news from Artfact and Morphy as well, and with my husband, who is great at bidding, will have luck at a local auction now and then. Here are some more tidbits from recent Theriault's auctions. I love the way they are written, don't you?
The choice from more than 300 beautiful antique and vintage dolls will be yours when Theriault’s open the doors at the BWI Airport Marriott in Linthicum, MD at 9 AM on Saturday morning, May 19, 2012. Just click on any of the photographs for a full description, or if you’d like to browse the complete auction, just click here. For more details about the auction, click here. We hope you can plan to attend in person, but if you cannot you can place pre-bids on Proxibid (click here) or plan to bid live online at the actual time of the auction. Or call Theriault’s at 800-638-0422 or 410-224-3655 and place absentee bids. Plan to attend the auction for the unsurpassed pleasure of choosing your dolls in person, and the thrill when you win the doll you chose. The preview begins at 9 AM and the auction fun begins at 11 AM Eastern Time. If you cannot attend the auction in person, there are other bidding choices. You can telephone Theriault’s at 410-224-3655 or 800-638-0422 and leave absentee bids on your favorites. Or you can bid online before the auction by leaving pre-bids. Or – the next best thing to being there – you can bid live online at the actual moment your doll comes up for auction. And you can watch and listen to the auction, too. Theriault's May 19, 2012 Auction is available for viewing online by clicking here.
“When all is said and done, what I really love are ‘just beautiful dolls’” is what a collector told us recently. If you feel the same, you’ll find plenty to love at Theriault’s antique doll estate auction coming right up this Saturday, April 28, 2012 at the Sheraton Annapolis. First, the French dolls. What a gorgeous group! And if that’s not enough just look at these beautiful German bisque dolls. Just click on any of the photographs for a full description, or if you’d like to browse the complete auction, just click here. For more details about the auction, click here. We hope you can plan to attend in person, but if you cannot you can place pre-bids on Proxibid (click here) or plan to bid live online at the actual time of the auction. Or call Theriault’s at 800-638-0422 or 410-224-3655 and place absentee bids. PS If you’re coming to the auction, plan to stay overnight in beautiful Annapolis, enjoy our historic town and great restaurants, and then attend the “no holds barred, anything goes, old-fashioned fun” legendary Ten2Go doll auction on Sunday, April 29. Where you must be there to bid, no online bidding and no absentee bids. A weekend of doll fun. See you then. Theriault's April 28, 2012 Auction is available for viewing online by clicking here. Ten2Go Auction - April 29, 2012 The Saturday auction will be followed by Theriault’s famous Ten2Go Doll auction on Sunday, April 29, 2012 where doll discoveries abound. More than 450 lots will be presented. Preview 9 AM. Note 10 AM auction time. At the Sunday auction, you must be present to bid. Directions To The Auctions The auctions are conducted at the Sheraton Annapolis located at 173 Jennifer Road, directly off US Route 50 in Annapolis. For further hotel information, call 410-266-3131. For more information about the auctions click here or telephone 800-638-0422 or email info@theriaults.com or stuart@theriaults.com.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

An Auction; At Play-Worth a Look

Beautiful Spring days and the summer fun ahead brings to mind happy thoughts of cheerful dolls and their playthings. Here are some wonderful choices coming up for auction at Theriault’s estate doll auction THIS COMING SATURDAY MAY 19. Please note our new location at the Baltimore/Washington International Airport (BWI Marriott) chosen so your attendance at the auction is easier than ever. And if you can’t attend, we welcome your absentee bids, or you can bid live online at the time of the auction. Just click on any of the photographs for a full description, or if you’d like to browse the complete auction, just click here. For more details about the auction, click here. We hope you can plan to attend in person, but if you cannot you can place pre-bids on Proxibid (click here) or plan to bid live online at the actual time of the auction. Or call Theriault’s at 800-638-0422 or 410-224-3655 and place absentee bids. Plan to attend the auction for the unsurpassed pleasure of choosing your dolls in person, and the thrill when you win the doll you chose. The preview begins at 9 AM and the auction fun begins at 11 AM Eastern Time. If you cannot attend the auction in person, there are other bidding choices. You can telephone Theriault’s at 410-224-3655 or 800-638-0422 and leave absentee bids on your favorites. Or you can bid online before the auction by leaving pre-bids. Or – the next best thing to being there – you can bid live online at the actual moment your doll comes up for auction. And you can watch and listen to the auction, too. Theriault's May 19, 2012 Auction is available for viewing online by clicking here. For more information about the auctions click here or telephone 800-638-0422 or email info@theriaults.com or stuart@theriaults.com. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

3 am musings; 3am is the Darkest Hour of the Soul

Or, so said to that effect F. Scott Fitzgerald. Barring Saturday, I haven't slept since Friday night with one thing or another. So, I tried the usual remedies, and watched my Perry Mason on MeTV, and just did the dishes. I've read, and knitted, and watched Emma-cat sleep, but maybe it's just been to much of a week. We lost at a young age a good friend at work very suddenly; he was a father, son, teacher, marathoner, financial analyst, good friend, caring roommate. It really was too much. One week ago, I was talking with him at length, shop talk and life in general. He had finished one marathon and was training for another at 52, probably in the best shape of his life. Now, he's gone, literally ashes for eternity, dust in the mind of history. None of us will forget him, but coping is very hard. I am shocked at the lack of compassion so many have, and how they think his unexpected death will somehow impact them. Blind mouths; small minds. I have thought of much tonight, of those I love, of how much I've lost. I keep thinking of Mother's Day, and how for me, it is another trip to the cemetery, and my mom hated cemeteries. One of my original 49 tips was "be spritiual, whatever that means to you!" Now, I have to emphasize that for everyone. I try for productive insomnia, and hope for even one solid hour of rest, but this sinus garbage won't set me free this year. This is at least the 4th or 5th time this year, and the last two felt like a walking pneumonia. RE my post on toxins; there are more in facial scrubs and some antibacterialk soaps. Google the topic, and read carefully. I know I can't use certain apricot scrubs due to an allergic reaction, and a certain plus version of a popular cough syrup makes me look like I have pink eye. Plant flowers or trees this weekend for someone you love, and have peace. Tell everyone you love, that you love him/her. You don't know if it will be the last time you see each other. Smile at a stranger; my first grade teacer told us we were all brothers and sisters. It isn't a bad thought. As hard as it is in an election year, try not to judge anyone. If we can't forgive, then try to forget. Sleep well. Now would be a good time to read F. Scott.

Tuesday, May 15, 2012

Marque

Just something I'm intersted in; bought the Marie Osmond version of the little angel from the Marque mold and was very pleased. From Wikipedia, below, and seems fairly accurate:
Life and workMarque was born in 1872 in Nanterre, Hauts-de-Seine. He became well-known and respected at the turn of the 19th to the 20th century, especially for his sculpting of children.[1] [edit] Confusion with Albert Marquet and relationship to FauvismMarque is sometimes confused for or conflated with Albert Marquet, a French Fauvist painter born three years later. This confusion of artists with similar name and age, and from the same country, is compounded by the fact that Henri Matisse often repeated the generally accepted story of the origin of the term Fauvism which involved Marque. According to Matisse's story, art critic Louis Vauxcelles saw a bust created by Marque on display where it was surrounded by the brash Fauvist paintings and proclaimed, "Donatello parmi les fauves!" ("Donatello among the wild beasts!")[2] [edit] A. Marque dollsDuring World War I, Albert Marque was persuaded by the Parisian couture fashion house of Jeanne Margaine-LaCroix to sculpt one hundred fashion dolls which were then clothed in custom-made outfits.[1][3] The dolls were exhibited in Paris in 1915. Some were sold and others were kept in the Margaine-Lacroix inventory. The dolls were dressed in costumes, often representing regional French royalty or peasantry. They are considered to be artistic works celebrating France and French culture, particularly as a response in wartime to the popularity of German dolls, and created for adults rather than as toys for children.[1] These dolls became known as "A. Marque" dolls from the mark placed on the dolls by the sculptor. The dolls have become highly valued in doll collecting. They are generally considered the most desirable dolls by collectors and demand the highest price of any dolls. On July 15, 2009, an A. Marque doll set the world record for an antique doll at auction, fetching US$263,000. This broke the previous world record of US$215,000 - also for an A. Marque doll.[4] In her work for the Doll Artisan Guild, Ragnhild Margareta Ericson catalogs twenty-five known A. Marque dolls.[5] Stuart Holbrook, the president of Theriault's (the leading auction firm dealing with dolls and childhood ephemera), also notes there are only about twenty A. Marque dolls in existence. Holbrook refers to them as the "Holy Grail of collectible dolls".[6] Holbrook and Theriault's contribute strongly to the allure of A. Marque dolls. Says Holbrook, "The A. Marque has always been a doll of great mystique for collectors. Every collectible category has that "one piece" - the one item, or name, that blends rarity, beauty, and allure; for dolls it is the Marque, and it will perhaps remain so forever."[7] [edit] References1.^ a b c Peers, Juliet (2005). The Fashion Doll: from Bebe Jumeau to Barbie. Berg. pp. 115–16. 2.^ Clement, Russell T. (1994). Les Fauves. Greenwood Publishing Group. pp. xi-xii. 3.^ "French doll shatters world auction record". Antique Trader. 5 August 2009. http://www.antiquetrader.com/article/french_doll_shatters_world_auction_record/. Retrieved 11 August 2009. 4.^ Corby, Margeaux (22 July 2009). "Annapolis firm fetches record price for antique doll". The Capital. http://www.hometownannapolis.com/news/top/2009/07/22-22/Annapolis-firm-fetches-record-price-for-antique-doll.html. Retrieved 11 August 2009. 5.^ Ericson, Ragnhild Margareta (24 July 2009). "Albert Marque dolls, their original costumes and labeling". Doll Artisans Guild. http://www.dollsbeautiful.com/uploads/Study_A_Marque_Dolls.pdf. Retrieved 25 April 2010. 6.^ Ferg, Carey (24 July 2009). "Albert Marque Doll Sets New World Auction Record". Dolls Magazine. Jones Publishing. http://www.dollsmagazine.com/articles/news-and-notes/36-newsanotes/247-albert-marque-doll-sets-new-world-auction-record.html. Retrieved 11 August 2009. 7.^ Van Patten, Denise (July 2009). "New World Record Price For Doll Set At Theriault's Auction - $263,000". About.com. http://collectdolls.about.com/od/antiquedolls1800s1920s/a/dollworldrecord.htm. Retrieved 19 August 2009. [edit] External linksAlbert Marque dolls, their original costumes and labeling Persondata Name Marque, Albert Alternative names Short description Date of birth 14 July 1872 Place of birth Date of death 1939 Place of death Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Albert_Marque&oldid=440713876" View page ratingsRate this page Rate this page Page ratings What's this?Current average ratings. Trustworthy Objective Complete Well-written Exceptional clarityI am highly knowledgeable about this topic (optional) I have a relevant college/university degreeIt is part of my professionIt is a deep personal passionThe source of my knowledge is not listed here I would like to help improve Wikipedia, send me an e-mail (optional) We will send you a confirmation e-mail. We will not share your e-mail address with outside parties as per our feedback privacy statement.Submit ratings Saved successfullyYour ratings have not been submitted yetYour ratings have expiredPlease reevaluate this page and submit new ratings. An error has occurred. Please try again later. Thanks! Your ratings have been saved.Please take a moment to complete a short survey.Start surveyMaybe later Thanks! Your ratings have been saved.Do you want to create an account?An account will help you track your edits, get involved in discussions, and be a part of the community.Create an accountorLog inMaybe later Thanks! Your ratings have been saved.Did you know that you can edit this page?Edit this pageMaybe later Categories: 1872 births1939 deathsFrench sculptorsDollmakersHidden categories: Persondata templates without short description parameter

Wednesday, May 9, 2012

Collector v. Voyeur

It's been one of those days; the bridge was closed, I took the wrong bill to pay with me, the phone died on me midconversation, everyone was yelling at me, I was getting three phone calls at once on my dead phone, everyone else wants me to do their work and cover for them, and I'm having stabbing pains just below my right shoulder.I thought the full moon was last week, not that I get time to look outside. So, it's a good time to vent a little on behalf of collectors. I don't watch "horders" [sic], deliberately, but I did stumble on an episode about a doll collector, and that's what they called her, not a a hoarder. She had fewer dolls in her living room than I did, and lived with a disabled but articulate son who didn't mind the dolls at all. Her other son who did not live there was a different matter. He obviously wanted her house, and maybe her more valuable items, and was threatening her with "adult protective services" and just about anything else. She had a lot of dolls, and liked to repair them. Most were soft bodied or cloth, not very heavy. The claim that her attic floor was "sagging with the weight" was silly; the house may have had structural damage, and I didn't hear sonny dearest offering to repair anything. Then, a prissy, alleged psychologist arrived, but I couldn't har her; a storm was brewing and interfering with delivery.
In short, she was compelled to get rid of her collection, an elderly widow with no husband was taken advantage of. When asked how she "felt" after the dumpster came for two truckloads of her dolls, she said, "I've donated to truckloads of dolls; isn't that enough for you? How do I feel? I regret doing it and I miss them, all of them." That's how I'd feel.
These shows, and the people in them are voyeuristic. I don't want to generalize, but go to about.com and read Denise Van Patten's newsletter/blog where she addresses doll collectors in the media. I have quotes I'll post that are positive about collectors, and the innate hunter/gatherer instincg Marily Gelfman Karp identifies in In Flagrante Collecto. I suggest they have no lives or love of history. Collecting as a hobby began in the ancient world as a means to show wealth, but also to preserve heritage and culture. Read E.D. Hirsch, Cultural Literacy, and Craig Childs on archaeology in general, though he is not fond of museums per se. Museum originally came from words meanin Temple of the Muses.
I don't think Rosalie Whyel, Susan Quinlan [even if she was snotty to me!], the late Flora Gill Jacobs, the late John Noble, the late Lenon Hoyte, The Brooklyn Doll and Toy Museum, The Yokohama Doll Museum, Musee de la Poupee, and others would share the view of the H. team. H. is making money; I don't know their credits, but I don't think they are a team of licensed psychiatrists. Nor are all news and reality shows the same. I will watch Cash in the Attic, Mission Organization, American Pickers, Collector Inspector, the old Collecitn across America and The Collectors, and enjoy them. I love both Antiques Roadshows, but enough of the the shows making people out to be "wacky" because they like history, or like to collect or trade with other collectors. Here is a quote from Richard O'Brien's Collecitng Toys, 2nd edition that is positive. The quote is from a New England physican whose hobby is collecting, "researchin and writing aout toys" who started to collect in the 1930's (O'Brien 1). The doctro's pen name is C.B.C. Lee (1). and "[He} was lucky enought ot have a mother who saved his collection while he was disintersted, serving int he Army, gettinghis education, and getting starte in practice. It as still safley in her attic when second childhood set in prematurely 19 years ago, and he has been busily enslaved by the hobby ever since. He has contributed to books and magazines on the subject, publsihed not only in the U.S.A., but also in England, france, Italy, New Zealnd, Australia, and Japan. He is in touch with collectors on five continents, and enthusiastically recommends the hobby as "escape therapy" and an antidoe fo the poressures, anxieties, furstrations and insults of live in the real world" (1).
Are we to give up our past to satsify the reality TV voyeurs? Watch the intro of American Pickers to see their take, and study about great collections and museums, look at the UFDC mission, and read Genevieve Angione, All Dolls are Collectible. Most of us have crowded spaces, but we can't all be Candi Spelling or the Strong Museum, or William Randolph Hearst, legendary and great collectors who should be admired for their work and collections.
The people on the H show can stay out of peoples' lives and homes. It isn't their business, and I suspect some people are duped into appearing on it. Collecting is not a disease; hoarding is a bad habit, like smoking or nail biting. Let's not mix it up or overdramatize it for entertainment purposes.
Here are some books that are more positive, and most are listed in my Bibliography of Dolls and Toys, in case I can't remember all the authors: Mary Randolph Carter, American Junk, Kitchen Junk, Garden Junk, Big City Junk, see her website Susan Sontag, The Volcano Lover Publication by The Strong Museum on the life of Margaret Woodbury Strong Publications by The House of the Rock, including biographies on the life of Alex Jordan Documentaries and monographs of artists who collected, including Rembrandt, Georgia O'Keeffe, Joseph Cornell, and Frida Kahlo Histories on the Library of Alexandria, now rebuilt Books about Rosalie Whyel and her dream Books by Gold Horse [Theriaults} on great doll collections Magnificent Obsessions Cabinets of Curiosities Make Magazine and Wired Magazine A Gentle Madness [book collections] Mary Hilller, Dolls and Doll Makers Books by Luella Hart, Clara Hallard Fawcett, Laura Starr, Janet Pagter Johl and Samuel Pryor Biographies of Isabella Stewart Gardner, Peggy Guggenheim, and Ima Hogg Finally, I keep lists of famous doll collectors, for that matter, I know a lot of judges and doctors with huge collections, many of dolls and figurines; here are a few, living and dead: Demi Moore, Charles Lindbergh and Sam Pryor, John Wayne, Barry Goldwater, Jane Withers, Shirley Temple, Sigmund Freud, Claude Levi-Strauss, Shirley Jackson [100,000 books and artifacts/statues on the occult], Umbero Eco [over 50,000 books]; Clara Scroggins Johnson [over 1 million Christmas Ornaments/artifacts alleged, including ALL the Hallmark ornaments]; Hattie McDaniels, Michael Jackson, Paul Rubens, International Doll Museum in New Dehli;

Monday, May 7, 2012

Doll Museum: The Doll Book Again

Doll Museum: The Doll Book Again: I will follow with a series of posts on Starr's wonderful book. It is available as a free eText on the web. I don't find the writing archa...

Because we never Know!

Just when I think I'm going to give it all up and have a new eBay career, something happens to motiviate me and inspire me. I have my "aha" moment re the world of doll collecting. I was surfing eBay recently, and found out I had some real treasures. I only talk money because it is a way for us to value our collectibles; I have no intention of selling, but I identified one of my thrift shop doll-diamonds in the rough as a Brigite Deval procelain doll.
Then, I recognized another of my "inmates." About three years ago I bought to reproduction dolls, beautifully dressed, as a pair. One is large, about 27 inches, and the other, her twin except in size, is about 12-16 inches. They were artist dolls, and the clothes are magnificent. I thought they were both Bru rerpos., but the smaller one as it turns out is an A.T. repro, and she is worth nearly $800 alone.
I was floored. I bought them because I loved them, and because I love to display them. I also saw Pat Loveless dolls going for between $100 and nearly $1000 dollars. About 8 years ago, I paid $35.00 for a black version of the Tete Jumeau. Actually, people got tired of seeing reproduction dolls at dolls shows, but few make them now. There is a lot of workmanship in these dolls, and alot of artistry. They are expensive to make, and are often better made than their high end antique couterparts. They serve a purpose when not involved in a fraud, especially; they teach new collectors about doll history and serve as an example of what was. They are also becoming old themselves; some of Emma Clear's dolls will soon be 75 years old. My first reproducton dolls are well over forty years old, so go figure. I bought two at an estate sale this weekend on compo, Seeley bodies, I think. One is another Tete Jumeau, dresse in pink and maroon with a wide, pleated bonnet and French shoes. The other is also about 24 in. high, and is an A.T. with blonde wig. She is dressed as a snow angel, in off white silk. Both are fantastic dolls, made by an acquaintance of mine who used to be well-known as an artist. She didn't sell many of the dolls she made; she was creating her own collection of "antique dolls" because as a child of The Depression, she did not have any dolls growing up. My grandmother was the same way; she loved dolls, but didn't have any till she was older and my family brought them to her from trips. These dolls were the seeds of my collection. So, you never, never know! For those who want to buy my book on Dolls, it is no longer on eBay. You may contact me directly to buy it.

Thursday, May 3, 2012

Strong National Museum of Play

Here are some updates from the Queen of all Doll/Toy Museums! Last Chance to Visit The Wizard of Oz Exhibit Saturday & Sunday May 12 & 13 Journey with Dorothy and friends from the sepia-colored Gale Farm to the vibrant Land of Oz. Explore Munchkinland, the Crossroads, the Witch's Castle, and more. To mark the closing of the exhibit, the Dryden Theatre at the George Eastman House will screen the original film at 7 p.m. on Friday, May 11 and 2 p.m. on Sunday, May 13. Bring your museum admission receipt or mention this offer and receive $1 off each movie ticket. Local media sponsors THE WIZARD OF OZ Children’s Educational Exhibit was created by Miami Children’s Museum and SPARKS, in conjunction with Warner Bros. Consumer Products. Judy Garland as Dorothy from THE WIZARD OF OZ. THE WIZARD OF OZ and all related characters and elements are trademarks of and © Turner Entertainment Co. (s12) The Strong's Online Collections Now Largest Among History Museums The Strong, home to the world’s most comprehensive collection of toys, dolls, games, books, photographs, documents, and other historical materials related to play, now offers more than 40,000 artifacts in its Online Collections—making it one of the largest online artifact assemblages available among history museums anywhere. Fan Photo of the Month Winner Congratulations to Chantel Orr from Ontario, March's Fan Photo of the Month winner! During the month of May, capture an image of your family creating at one of the many craft tables in the museum. Upload your image to the museum's Facebook page for your chance to win a FREE membership. For more information, become a fan of the National Museum of Play on Facebook and see Fan Photo of the Month contest rules. Traveling this Summer? Become a Patron-level Member and Save Become a Patron-level member and receive reciprocal free or discounted admission to nearly 200 children’s museums nationwide and in Canada. Patron-level members also receive four free one-time use guest passes (a $52 value) and four free one-time use passes to Dancing Wings Butterfly Garden (a $16 value). Upgrade today!

From T. Tudor Newsletter

This is an excerpt from Cellar Door. Since the Dolls' Christmas, I think I've lived and breathed Tasha Tudor, and I've collected her books and memorabilia for many years. My prize is a letter she wrote and illustrated for me, with sketches of Sethany Ann and Nicey Melinda. I now have original dolls like them in the Museum, and I ahve dressed another like Annabelle. I sued to show video of her and play a tape; she was a tough woman, but gentle. How I wanted to live like her! I've never found anyone who's art I like better; she has something about her style that is both whimsical and realistic. Enjoy the excerpt below; she was a woman for all seasons- McCready and Dorr Residencies in New Hampshire Artists know other artists, of course. We can be grateful that the watercolorist Tasha Tudor should have been a close friend of the photographer Nell Dorr. Dorr encouraged Tudor. And Tudor served as both a photographic model for Dorr as well as living out the ideals that Dorr espoused. If you do not know Dorr's work, Google her and you will find that she learned photography from her father at a young age. Her Mother and Child is a lovingly presented photo essay featuring her family and Tasha Tudor's family. The two women collaborated to create the 1955 dolls' wedding and the filmic record of the event The Golden Key. You may also have seen the 1955 Life magazine that reported the fantasy dolls' wedding to the world. Nell Dorr was a generation older than Tudor. We do not know the circumstances of the young artist Tasha Tudor's meeting with the older photographer Nell Dorr. It is certain that they met while both lived in Connecticut. Perhaps Tudor's artist mother introduced them. Dorr's daughter Elizabeth and Tudor were born in 1915. Tom and Tasha McCready's first child Bethany was born in 1940 during their Redding, CT, residence. Nell Dorr was Bethany's godmother and remained close throughout her life. We know from a brief history of the Saugituck Reservoir that Nell Dorr and others met Connecticut governor Wilbur Cross in his chambers about 1930 to protest the flooding of the Saugatuck valley to create a water supply for the city of Bridgeport. The project went forward and today the 827 acre lake covers part of the town of Redding. It is only ½ mile from the house on Tudor Road where Tasha and Tom McCready began their family life. This is the house Rosamund Tudor purchased after her divorce to be close to her friend Rosamund Mikkleson, a granddaughter of the author Nathaniel Hawthorn. There is an often repeated story that Nell Dorr moved her daughters and grandchildren to New Hampshire from the Connecticut coast for safety during World War II. Her husband John V. N. Dorr and her three sons-in-laws were serving in the war. In truth, the war was nearly at an end when she purchased a farm in New Hampshire, although the family may have been renting for some time prior to the purchase. I have not been able to determine who discovered Southern New Hampshire first - the McCreadys or the Dorrs. Their legal actions were nearly simultaneous. The Merrimack County, NH, Registry of Deeds gives some facts, but it doesn't answer the question. Thomas Leighton McCready, Jr. and Tasha Tudor McCready purchased the Ed Garrish farm in Webster, NH, on March 20, 1945, Liber 607, folio 136. One month later on April 24, 1945, 613:318, Nell Dorr purchased the Harry Pelren farm in neighboring Hopkinton, three miles distant. Another often repeated story is that Tudor used the proceeds from her Mother Goose to purchase the Gerrish farm. Mother Goose was published in October 1944; a first royalty check for the work would have been received in Spring 1945. The McCreadys give their address at the time as Hopkinton, indicating that they had already left Connecticut and were renting temporary housing. Virginia Nell Dorr (of Westport, CT) purchased her property in her own name. John V. N. Dorr signed a mortgage with her, but relinquished his right of curtesy at the same time. Dorr sold her first purchase to her daughter Elizabeth and husband John Howe a year later. She bought another old property nearby and retained it until August 27, 1959, 848:525. She remained in Connecticut until her death. The McCreadys divorced with her husband signing a quit claim deed to Tasha Tudor McCready May 3, 1961, 881:279. His former wife changed her name legally to Tasha Tudor, remarried, divorced a second time, and finally sold her 400 acre farm to a neighbor up the road, Abby A. Rockefeller (daughter of David Rockefeller) September 10, 1971, 1107:405. At that time she moved to her final home in Marlboro, Vermont